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Q:
i recently shot a wood duck and would like to preserve the wings. after removing them will it be okay if i leave them the way they are or should i do something to them to preserve them?

Question by drummaboy61954. Uploaded on October 27, 2011

Answers (7)

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from tneal1987 wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

I generally pack salt around where they were removed. Salt seems to be the cheapest and works the best for me. I do this to my turkey and pheasant tails and wings.

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from fliphuntr14 wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

salt and borax soup in a powder form that is the cheapest and most effective way i know. borax tends to kill bacteria and preserve bone and not let it deteriorate. once you remove them put salt on for 3 days to a week then borax for about the same time then do with what you want after that.

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from Brutus3542 wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

I do this for a museum at a university. First cut open a slice on the underside of the wing (the meaty part with the two bones). Then take tweezers and pluck out as much meat off of the bone as you can get. If there is a little left, thats okay, but the big part is to get the majority of it. Then take borax (you can buy it at most grocery stores) and stuff it in the opening. Next lay the skin back over to close the opening. Then configure the wing how you want it and pin it to some styrafoam. Let it sit a couple of days to harden up and then you should be good. This works for all bird wings. Good luck !!!

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from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

Brutus is Right On! You need to remove the meat from the wings or it will decay. Slice the underside and remove it as he says. Most dry laundry detergents will work as a preservative if you don't have borax.

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from jamesti wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

i use regular salt and keep changing it every day or so until everything is dry. i use a lot of these things for my fly tying.

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from Kyle Pountney wrote 2 years 21 weeks ago

borax is the key

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from Woods Walker wrote 2 years 19 weeks ago

Remember to seal them up if you are going to store them - I had collected almost an entire set of duck wings for my area (using the borax techniques described above and removing most of the meat), then stored them in a plastic storage bin. The dermestid beetles found them and, when I opened the bin after a year, there was very little left! If I were to do this again, I would seal them in a bin with a Shell No Pest Strip to kill anything that might be able to find its way into the bin. If you are hanging them on display, keep an eye out for damage to the wings or shed insect exoskeletons - if you find some, I would seal the wing in a container with a Shell No Pest Strip and/or rapidly freeze the wing to kill the dermestids.

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from Brutus3542 wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

I do this for a museum at a university. First cut open a slice on the underside of the wing (the meaty part with the two bones). Then take tweezers and pluck out as much meat off of the bone as you can get. If there is a little left, thats okay, but the big part is to get the majority of it. Then take borax (you can buy it at most grocery stores) and stuff it in the opening. Next lay the skin back over to close the opening. Then configure the wing how you want it and pin it to some styrafoam. Let it sit a couple of days to harden up and then you should be good. This works for all bird wings. Good luck !!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from fliphuntr14 wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

salt and borax soup in a powder form that is the cheapest and most effective way i know. borax tends to kill bacteria and preserve bone and not let it deteriorate. once you remove them put salt on for 3 days to a week then borax for about the same time then do with what you want after that.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kyle Pountney wrote 2 years 21 weeks ago

borax is the key

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Woods Walker wrote 2 years 19 weeks ago

Remember to seal them up if you are going to store them - I had collected almost an entire set of duck wings for my area (using the borax techniques described above and removing most of the meat), then stored them in a plastic storage bin. The dermestid beetles found them and, when I opened the bin after a year, there was very little left! If I were to do this again, I would seal them in a bin with a Shell No Pest Strip to kill anything that might be able to find its way into the bin. If you are hanging them on display, keep an eye out for damage to the wings or shed insect exoskeletons - if you find some, I would seal the wing in a container with a Shell No Pest Strip and/or rapidly freeze the wing to kill the dermestids.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tneal1987 wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

I generally pack salt around where they were removed. Salt seems to be the cheapest and works the best for me. I do this to my turkey and pheasant tails and wings.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

Brutus is Right On! You need to remove the meat from the wings or it will decay. Slice the underside and remove it as he says. Most dry laundry detergents will work as a preservative if you don't have borax.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 2 years 25 weeks ago

i use regular salt and keep changing it every day or so until everything is dry. i use a lot of these things for my fly tying.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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