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Q:
What is the advantage to using a longer pole when Salmon and Steelhead fishing? I fish the Salmon River in Pulaski, NY and I always see people with 8 foot poles. Why do they do this?

Question by Catspg20. Uploaded on March 25, 2011

Answers (14)

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from jay wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

The longer the pole, the further you can cast.

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from Christian Emter wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Yup, the farther you can reach out and catch them little stinkers

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from labrador12 wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

In Ak where there are times and places where it is almost impossible to not snag the odd humpy, the long rods give a man the ability to control the smaller snagged fish so that you are not locked into a 15 minute battle with a tail or dorsal hooked fish that is aggravating and non productive. Long rods give better leverage when fighting a nice 12lb + silver too!

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from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

The long rod casts further; takes up the shock of the jumping and turning salmon (they put a lot more pressure on the rod than fish like bass or walleye); and can be bent in half over a downrigger to take up slack line when a fish hits. Finally, they let you attach a five foot leader for trolling and still be able to hold the rod high enough to net the fish yourself. I use 9 foot rods for most salmon fishing. I use 11 1/2 foot rods for fast water steelhead and coho fishing mainly to take up the shock of their flipping and darting on the surface.

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from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

The long rod casts further; takes up the shock of the jumping and turning salmon (they put a lot more pressure on the rod than fish like bass or walleye); and can be bent in half over a downrigger to take up slack line when a fish hits. Finally, they let you attach a five foot leader for trolling and still be able to hold the rod high enough to net the fish yourself. I use 9 foot rods for most salmon fishing. I use 11 1/2 foot rods for fast water steelhead and coho fishing mainly to take up the shock of their flipping and darting on the surface.

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from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Long rods do allow you to cast further, but the main reasoning behind longer rods for salmon and trout are to be able to use lighter weight lines. Longer rods put the fight on the rod and not the line. Salmon & Trout are very line shy and heavy lines spook them.
Lake trolling rods in 8'6" to 10'ML 20# line, stream /river rods anywhere from 8'6" to 13'L/ML with 6# line will catch more fish then a 6'6" rod with 20# line, unless of course you are snagging.

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from furbuster wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Longer rods always win in every catigory if you have the room to use them. The olny reason I use a shorter rod is when you have obstructions that won't let you use a long rod. My favorite rod is a 9'6" 4 weight because it has so much play in it all fish feel like they are large. I built a 10' 8weight med fast action rod that I use for Salmond in Michigan that can get out alot of line & plenty of play in it.

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from shane wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Helps with landing. You can control the fight more, whether out on a long run or near the end.

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from Wade Neubauer wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

the longer the pole the more you fight the fish with the pole on the line. with a 6 ft rod it has a small arch and thus more pressure is exerted on the line. with and 8 ft rod the arch is much bigger and is able to take much of the pressure off the line. this results in better control and less line breaking during the fight.

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from rdorman wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

what everyone else said, but also it helps control the drift...most of what everyone is fishing is designed to be drifted, but also the leverage it entails by being tall...helps turn a big king running downstream with heavy current

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from rdorman wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

also helps set the hook at more distances and with more power...it's leverage...and it entails many more results

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from Catspg20 wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Thanks for all the help everybody!

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from Scott Cooper wrote 2 years 51 weeks ago

i also fish in that neck of the woods and use a 9foot ugly stick the reason is becouse its more sensative and i can feel everything the sinkers bounce off. as soon as i feel the sinkers stop i yank

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from Sabotage wrote 1 year 45 weeks ago

For Steelhead and Salmon a longer rod has several advantages. First, that length of a rod does not affect the ability to cast farther as much as the action of the rod does. A light or medium action six foot rod will cast farther than a nine foot heavy action rod (using the same amount of weight) as the tip on the light action flexes more creating more kinetic energy. This also applies to being able to put pressure on a fish when angling. The second rating of a rod, or the 'power' rating dictates how much backbone a rod has to stop a running fish. A fast rod flexes approximately 1/3 of the way down, a medium rod flexes approximately 2/3 and a slow power rod flexes down through the butt. The reason longer rods are used for S&S fishing is line control. With float fishing the longer rod allows you to mend your line easier thereby creating a drag free float which is essential in S&S fishing. When drift fishing the longer rod creates a sharper angle from the rod tip to the point of entry of the line with the water. This sharper angle keeps more line off the water again reducing drag and allowing for more a more sensitive feel.

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from jay wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

The longer the pole, the further you can cast.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Long rods do allow you to cast further, but the main reasoning behind longer rods for salmon and trout are to be able to use lighter weight lines. Longer rods put the fight on the rod and not the line. Salmon & Trout are very line shy and heavy lines spook them.
Lake trolling rods in 8'6" to 10'ML 20# line, stream /river rods anywhere from 8'6" to 13'L/ML with 6# line will catch more fish then a 6'6" rod with 20# line, unless of course you are snagging.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rdorman wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

what everyone else said, but also it helps control the drift...most of what everyone is fishing is designed to be drifted, but also the leverage it entails by being tall...helps turn a big king running downstream with heavy current

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Christian Emter wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Yup, the farther you can reach out and catch them little stinkers

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from labrador12 wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

In Ak where there are times and places where it is almost impossible to not snag the odd humpy, the long rods give a man the ability to control the smaller snagged fish so that you are not locked into a 15 minute battle with a tail or dorsal hooked fish that is aggravating and non productive. Long rods give better leverage when fighting a nice 12lb + silver too!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

The long rod casts further; takes up the shock of the jumping and turning salmon (they put a lot more pressure on the rod than fish like bass or walleye); and can be bent in half over a downrigger to take up slack line when a fish hits. Finally, they let you attach a five foot leader for trolling and still be able to hold the rod high enough to net the fish yourself. I use 9 foot rods for most salmon fishing. I use 11 1/2 foot rods for fast water steelhead and coho fishing mainly to take up the shock of their flipping and darting on the surface.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

The long rod casts further; takes up the shock of the jumping and turning salmon (they put a lot more pressure on the rod than fish like bass or walleye); and can be bent in half over a downrigger to take up slack line when a fish hits. Finally, they let you attach a five foot leader for trolling and still be able to hold the rod high enough to net the fish yourself. I use 9 foot rods for most salmon fishing. I use 11 1/2 foot rods for fast water steelhead and coho fishing mainly to take up the shock of their flipping and darting on the surface.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from furbuster wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Longer rods always win in every catigory if you have the room to use them. The olny reason I use a shorter rod is when you have obstructions that won't let you use a long rod. My favorite rod is a 9'6" 4 weight because it has so much play in it all fish feel like they are large. I built a 10' 8weight med fast action rod that I use for Salmond in Michigan that can get out alot of line & plenty of play in it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Helps with landing. You can control the fight more, whether out on a long run or near the end.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wade Neubauer wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

the longer the pole the more you fight the fish with the pole on the line. with a 6 ft rod it has a small arch and thus more pressure is exerted on the line. with and 8 ft rod the arch is much bigger and is able to take much of the pressure off the line. this results in better control and less line breaking during the fight.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rdorman wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

also helps set the hook at more distances and with more power...it's leverage...and it entails many more results

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Catspg20 wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Thanks for all the help everybody!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Scott Cooper wrote 2 years 51 weeks ago

i also fish in that neck of the woods and use a 9foot ugly stick the reason is becouse its more sensative and i can feel everything the sinkers bounce off. as soon as i feel the sinkers stop i yank

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sabotage wrote 1 year 45 weeks ago

For Steelhead and Salmon a longer rod has several advantages. First, that length of a rod does not affect the ability to cast farther as much as the action of the rod does. A light or medium action six foot rod will cast farther than a nine foot heavy action rod (using the same amount of weight) as the tip on the light action flexes more creating more kinetic energy. This also applies to being able to put pressure on a fish when angling. The second rating of a rod, or the 'power' rating dictates how much backbone a rod has to stop a running fish. A fast rod flexes approximately 1/3 of the way down, a medium rod flexes approximately 2/3 and a slow power rod flexes down through the butt. The reason longer rods are used for S&S fishing is line control. With float fishing the longer rod allows you to mend your line easier thereby creating a drag free float which is essential in S&S fishing. When drift fishing the longer rod creates a sharper angle from the rod tip to the point of entry of the line with the water. This sharper angle keeps more line off the water again reducing drag and allowing for more a more sensitive feel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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