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Q:
I just bout a ugly stik lite fishing pole... 7 ft... Has anyone had good luck with the poles.. Are they really as strong as they say they are??? And are they a good pole???

Question by Hunting92. Uploaded on May 17, 2011

Answers (18)

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from Cgull wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

They are good and tough poles. They do have some cons though. Uglysticks do not have enough backbone and are way too heavy for throwing lures all day.

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from santa wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

Dollar for dollar, Ugly Sticks by Shakespeare are a very good buy. The rod business is very competitive and a lot of different rods are built and to different tastes. Ugly Sticks are made and sold in such volumes that the price can be kept reasonable for the quality. Cgull talks about being "too heavy to cast all day". I have cast true temper steel rods all day and solid fiberglass rods all day and find that balance is more important than weight. Even a very light weight rod that is not comfortable can wear you out in a short time. When you buy a new rod, just make sure that it is comfortable for you and your fishing.

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from Kenton wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I have a couple of med action, 6'6" Ugly Stick Lites. The Lites arent near as heavy as the original and have performed pretty well for me. While bass fishing a couple years ago my son and I caught a few muskies over 50" and the rods held up just fine. For the price is a great rod...

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from chuckles wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I like them. I have one that I use for heavy cover and it works well for winching them out of the weeds. They are pretty indestructable, I did bend it back to touch the handle once just to see. It worked but I wouldn't make a habit of it. Happy fishing!

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from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I'm an Ugly Stick fan! I prefer them over most others for trolling where the added weight isn't an issue. I use many of the 7 footers and couldn't be happier. They are tough for sure but I like the high quality for the relatively low price.

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from Karen Hieb wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I have an ugly stick light that I love. Dollar for dollar I find it had the most sensitivity, I can feel the tiny nibble of a mooneye and I've landed walleye and northern pike with it as well.

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from Jere Smith wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I like the ugly stick for large fish like coho.

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from Carl Huber wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

Good rod I've used them for over 30 years. If you mean are they as strong as they say I would stay away from the garbage disposal.

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from Sourdough Dave wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I had a really good 6'6" medium action that served me well until I slammed it in a door ruining the upper two guides. The rods are almost indestructable but the guides are not. I replaced it with a 7' light action and it is even better.

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from jeffrey.cote23@... wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I wont use anything but ugly sticks they are very tough rods I used my 6'6" rod to land 25-32" Stripers and handled it like a charm!

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from Drew McClure wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I fished all day with a med action ugly-stick and I have never wanted anything else I have 3, ultra-lite, med lite(spinning reel, and med baitcaster(bass,catfish), I land heavy turtles and carp with the 6 ft baitcaster, I am so accustom to it that I will not switch to a longer more expensive rod. I also like fishing with more limber rods for whitebass, and trout, but often I fish with the 870 of fishing rods.

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from SIR JAMES wrote 2 years 45 weeks ago

I have a medium action Ugly stick & I refuse to own any other kind of rod. if the price of an ugly stick tripled in cost, I would still buy it. in my opinion, they are the best you can get.

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from Traven Thai wrote 50 weeks 1 day ago

I'm gonna put it out there... I own two of them, but recently switched to graphite rods because they are lighter and more sensitive. I find that graphite rods perform much better when you fish lures and need sensitivity.

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from Traven Thai wrote 50 weeks 1 day ago

Way to late for a post..

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from santa wrote 50 weeks 1 day ago

Traven Thai, I would not say that it is too late for a post, but not very many people look back more than a few days to see posts. Yet there are a few of us that do look for new posts even to old questions. Now as to the "feel" of a rod, it is not important. The line is where all the feel rests. Just like a tin can telephone (two cans tied together with a string), the line transmits all the vibrations. The correct way to fish is to always have one finger with the line brushing on it so that you can feel the vibrations of the bait tied to the other end. The rod's job is to actually isolate you from the fish by becoming a shock absorber which soaks up the transmissions from the fighting of the fish. I have been designing rods and reels for over forty years and even helped to hand build some of the very first prototype graphite rods. I also was on Lew's Speed Team that designed and built the first ergonomic completely disengaging level wind baitcast reel for the bass industry which became the Lew's BB1 Speed Spool. ( google "history-lew's fishing tackle" ). Working for Lew, I was even paid to bass fish and test products during the seventies. WE experimented with an electronic device to detect fish around the bait. The device had to be reasonably priced and simple to use in order to sell. The first ideas we had were to attach it to the rod to pick up vibrations and soon found that the vibrations in the rod were much too muffled to pick up with any dependability. Next we tried picking up the vibrations directly from the line and the device was a great success. You could even hear each rotation of a spinner blade in the ear piece as a spinner bait traveled through the water. When worm fishing, you could detect the sounds of a bass swimming very close to the worm. But it never made it to the market because of patent problems and actual cost of manufacture at that time. Maybe now thirty years later, I should check out to see if the patents problems no longer exist and if the manufacture could be done in China cheaply enough to actually get it on the market.

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from Traven Thai wrote 17 weeks 6 days ago

That's interesting to hear, you must know a lot about rods. These discussions could go on forever, but aren't the purpose of rods to 1.absorb impact 2.allow for hook-sets by providing leverage 3.Store energy like a slingshot which then propels the lure at a high velocity 4.transmit vibrations from the lines slapping the guides.
Unless big game fishing is involved, graphite rods are usually superior
I guess all this applies mostly to lure fishing and a different rod or fishing method would apply to each unique situation.

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from Traven Thai wrote 17 weeks 6 days ago

That's interesting to hear, you must know a lot about rods. These discussions could go on forever, but aren't the purpose of rods to 1.absorb impact 2.allow for hook-sets by providing leverage 3.Store energy like a slingshot which then propels the lure at a high velocity 4.transmit vibrations from the lines slapping the guides. 5. like previously stated to absorb shock
Unless big game fishing is involved, graphite rods are usually superior
I guess all this applies mostly to lure fishing and a different rod or fishing method would apply to each unique situation.
(i now have a bass boat and a bunch of nice graphite rods)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from santa wrote 17 weeks 6 days ago

Traven, You are correct about about rod leverage. Length is what most people associate with leverage, but the action of the rod is much more important than the length. For example, it is very hard to get a light action rod to set a worm hook, yet it is great for casting long distances with 3/8 oz. or less lures. On the other hand, a medium action rod will do both cast light lures and set a worm hook with satisfactory results. While a heavy action rod is great for setting a worm hook, it is not very good for casting light lures. I had a counter put on my wrist back in the early seventies to determine the number of casts I made in a normal day of fishing. When I was fishing with Shag Shahid, (google Shag Shahid) we averaged over 2000 casts a day each. When I was fishing with Lew Childre, we averaged over 1800 casts a day each. When I fished by myself, I was well over 2000 casts per day. The number of casts was affected by the amount of time we spent running the boat from fishing spot to fishing spot looking for bass. But the bottom line is you need a well balanced rod that is comfortable to you or you will be worn out by the end of the day. I found that a short five foot two inch rod was all I ever needed to bass fish with. I always loaded the tip of the rod so that the rod shot the lure much like a bow shoots an arrow, (just make a hard, fast, tight circle with the tip of the rod and release at the bottom of the circle and the energy stored up in the rod will shoot the lure out on the cast). With that 5'2" rod in all three actions, I could cast further than most people using six or six and a half foot rod and with less effort. AS to the guides transmitting the vibrations from the line to the rod, the rod is a shock absorber and it deadens the vibrations such that they are not at all very detectable in the rod. This was actually proven by the electronic pick-up we put on the rod for testing. If only it had been true that the rod would pick up vibrations from the lure, we would have had an electronic fish detector on every rod by the early eighties. That would be because picking them up from the rod would have beat existing patents of the day concerning picking up vibrations from wires (the line). As to Graphite rods, they are very light, strong and durable. But the ideal geometric shape for the action of a rod is a parabolic cure. Graphite rods usually have a straight stiff section just at the tip. This is because they are hollow and the inside diameter is so small that the insides of the hole in the rod start to touch when bent. To cure this problem, most manufactures make the very tip solid. This solid tip interrupts the smooth continuous parabolic curve. This also cuts down on the loadability of the tip which I depend on to cast. Of course I still own several dozen graphite rods and use them, but I still prefer my old glass rods which I use too. When I put on a casting demonstration doing trick casting, I will always use fiberglass rods.

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from Cgull wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

They are good and tough poles. They do have some cons though. Uglysticks do not have enough backbone and are way too heavy for throwing lures all day.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from santa wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

Dollar for dollar, Ugly Sticks by Shakespeare are a very good buy. The rod business is very competitive and a lot of different rods are built and to different tastes. Ugly Sticks are made and sold in such volumes that the price can be kept reasonable for the quality. Cgull talks about being "too heavy to cast all day". I have cast true temper steel rods all day and solid fiberglass rods all day and find that balance is more important than weight. Even a very light weight rod that is not comfortable can wear you out in a short time. When you buy a new rod, just make sure that it is comfortable for you and your fishing.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kenton wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I have a couple of med action, 6'6" Ugly Stick Lites. The Lites arent near as heavy as the original and have performed pretty well for me. While bass fishing a couple years ago my son and I caught a few muskies over 50" and the rods held up just fine. For the price is a great rod...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuckles wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I like them. I have one that I use for heavy cover and it works well for winching them out of the weeds. They are pretty indestructable, I did bend it back to touch the handle once just to see. It worked but I wouldn't make a habit of it. Happy fishing!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I'm an Ugly Stick fan! I prefer them over most others for trolling where the added weight isn't an issue. I use many of the 7 footers and couldn't be happier. They are tough for sure but I like the high quality for the relatively low price.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Karen Hieb wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I have an ugly stick light that I love. Dollar for dollar I find it had the most sensitivity, I can feel the tiny nibble of a mooneye and I've landed walleye and northern pike with it as well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I like the ugly stick for large fish like coho.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

Good rod I've used them for over 30 years. If you mean are they as strong as they say I would stay away from the garbage disposal.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sourdough Dave wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I had a really good 6'6" medium action that served me well until I slammed it in a door ruining the upper two guides. The rods are almost indestructable but the guides are not. I replaced it with a 7' light action and it is even better.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jeffrey.cote23@... wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I wont use anything but ugly sticks they are very tough rods I used my 6'6" rod to land 25-32" Stripers and handled it like a charm!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

I fished all day with a med action ugly-stick and I have never wanted anything else I have 3, ultra-lite, med lite(spinning reel, and med baitcaster(bass,catfish), I land heavy turtles and carp with the 6 ft baitcaster, I am so accustom to it that I will not switch to a longer more expensive rod. I also like fishing with more limber rods for whitebass, and trout, but often I fish with the 870 of fishing rods.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SIR JAMES wrote 2 years 45 weeks ago

I have a medium action Ugly stick & I refuse to own any other kind of rod. if the price of an ugly stick tripled in cost, I would still buy it. in my opinion, they are the best you can get.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Traven Thai wrote 50 weeks 1 day ago

I'm gonna put it out there... I own two of them, but recently switched to graphite rods because they are lighter and more sensitive. I find that graphite rods perform much better when you fish lures and need sensitivity.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Traven Thai wrote 50 weeks 1 day ago

Way to late for a post..

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from santa wrote 50 weeks 1 day ago

Traven Thai, I would not say that it is too late for a post, but not very many people look back more than a few days to see posts. Yet there are a few of us that do look for new posts even to old questions. Now as to the "feel" of a rod, it is not important. The line is where all the feel rests. Just like a tin can telephone (two cans tied together with a string), the line transmits all the vibrations. The correct way to fish is to always have one finger with the line brushing on it so that you can feel the vibrations of the bait tied to the other end. The rod's job is to actually isolate you from the fish by becoming a shock absorber which soaks up the transmissions from the fighting of the fish. I have been designing rods and reels for over forty years and even helped to hand build some of the very first prototype graphite rods. I also was on Lew's Speed Team that designed and built the first ergonomic completely disengaging level wind baitcast reel for the bass industry which became the Lew's BB1 Speed Spool. ( google "history-lew's fishing tackle" ). Working for Lew, I was even paid to bass fish and test products during the seventies. WE experimented with an electronic device to detect fish around the bait. The device had to be reasonably priced and simple to use in order to sell. The first ideas we had were to attach it to the rod to pick up vibrations and soon found that the vibrations in the rod were much too muffled to pick up with any dependability. Next we tried picking up the vibrations directly from the line and the device was a great success. You could even hear each rotation of a spinner blade in the ear piece as a spinner bait traveled through the water. When worm fishing, you could detect the sounds of a bass swimming very close to the worm. But it never made it to the market because of patent problems and actual cost of manufacture at that time. Maybe now thirty years later, I should check out to see if the patents problems no longer exist and if the manufacture could be done in China cheaply enough to actually get it on the market.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Traven Thai wrote 17 weeks 6 days ago

That's interesting to hear, you must know a lot about rods. These discussions could go on forever, but aren't the purpose of rods to 1.absorb impact 2.allow for hook-sets by providing leverage 3.Store energy like a slingshot which then propels the lure at a high velocity 4.transmit vibrations from the lines slapping the guides.
Unless big game fishing is involved, graphite rods are usually superior
I guess all this applies mostly to lure fishing and a different rod or fishing method would apply to each unique situation.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Traven Thai wrote 17 weeks 6 days ago

That's interesting to hear, you must know a lot about rods. These discussions could go on forever, but aren't the purpose of rods to 1.absorb impact 2.allow for hook-sets by providing leverage 3.Store energy like a slingshot which then propels the lure at a high velocity 4.transmit vibrations from the lines slapping the guides. 5. like previously stated to absorb shock
Unless big game fishing is involved, graphite rods are usually superior
I guess all this applies mostly to lure fishing and a different rod or fishing method would apply to each unique situation.
(i now have a bass boat and a bunch of nice graphite rods)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from santa wrote 17 weeks 6 days ago

Traven, You are correct about about rod leverage. Length is what most people associate with leverage, but the action of the rod is much more important than the length. For example, it is very hard to get a light action rod to set a worm hook, yet it is great for casting long distances with 3/8 oz. or less lures. On the other hand, a medium action rod will do both cast light lures and set a worm hook with satisfactory results. While a heavy action rod is great for setting a worm hook, it is not very good for casting light lures. I had a counter put on my wrist back in the early seventies to determine the number of casts I made in a normal day of fishing. When I was fishing with Shag Shahid, (google Shag Shahid) we averaged over 2000 casts a day each. When I was fishing with Lew Childre, we averaged over 1800 casts a day each. When I fished by myself, I was well over 2000 casts per day. The number of casts was affected by the amount of time we spent running the boat from fishing spot to fishing spot looking for bass. But the bottom line is you need a well balanced rod that is comfortable to you or you will be worn out by the end of the day. I found that a short five foot two inch rod was all I ever needed to bass fish with. I always loaded the tip of the rod so that the rod shot the lure much like a bow shoots an arrow, (just make a hard, fast, tight circle with the tip of the rod and release at the bottom of the circle and the energy stored up in the rod will shoot the lure out on the cast). With that 5'2" rod in all three actions, I could cast further than most people using six or six and a half foot rod and with less effort. AS to the guides transmitting the vibrations from the line to the rod, the rod is a shock absorber and it deadens the vibrations such that they are not at all very detectable in the rod. This was actually proven by the electronic pick-up we put on the rod for testing. If only it had been true that the rod would pick up vibrations from the lure, we would have had an electronic fish detector on every rod by the early eighties. That would be because picking them up from the rod would have beat existing patents of the day concerning picking up vibrations from wires (the line). As to Graphite rods, they are very light, strong and durable. But the ideal geometric shape for the action of a rod is a parabolic cure. Graphite rods usually have a straight stiff section just at the tip. This is because they are hollow and the inside diameter is so small that the insides of the hole in the rod start to touch when bent. To cure this problem, most manufactures make the very tip solid. This solid tip interrupts the smooth continuous parabolic curve. This also cuts down on the loadability of the tip which I depend on to cast. Of course I still own several dozen graphite rods and use them, but I still prefer my old glass rods which I use too. When I put on a casting demonstration doing trick casting, I will always use fiberglass rods.

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