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Q:
Does anyone know a lot about flounder gigging? Is it better late at night or early in the morning before sunrise? Also, what is the ideal water temperature and lunar phase and all that kinda stuff? I'm going to the MS Coast for work this week and the hotel is on the beach so I figure why not. Last time I did it I came back with four but I think that was more luck than anything.

Question by redfishunter. Uploaded on March 27, 2012

Answers (7)

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from redfishunter wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Also, any suggestions on a cheap gig light? Or how to rig one up with a normal light?

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from santa wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

I have two old Coleman double mantle gas lanterns that were modified with aluminum dish pans for reflectors. I have always used them when wading and walking for flounder as well as at jubilees on the eastern shore of Mobile bay. They also come in handy during hurricanes for emergency light. When in a boat, I use 12 volt light bulbs in a rubber pigtails under water. For simi-muddy or cloudy water, I change to 32 volt bulbs but still only use a 12 volt battery. The 32 volt bulb will put out a much dimmer light and you can see better with the bad water conditions. I have mine rigged on a hinged arm with the bulb sticking out the bottom of a lid off a styrofoam cooler which is wrapped in aluminum foil. That way the light bulb is under water but still floats at the surface so that it doesn't ever hit the bottom. But a lot of people just rig a bulb and pigtail in a coffee can on a stick and just "C" clamp it to the boat.

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from santa wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Sorry about the second post, but in the first post, I forgot the part of the question about when to flounder. Flounder go to shallow water to feed and can even be found in as little as two inch deep water. They bed up on the bottom and blend in to catch prey. As the tide comes in, they move in with it, but they quickly move back out to deep water when the tide first starts to go back out so that they do not end up caught out in the shallows, high and dry. Flounders leave a track as they move in. You can see the places on the bottom where they have bed and when they leave that place the fins leave a trail on the bottom that can be followed to the next place they bed. High and low tide times change each day so the best time to flounder also changes each day. Flounder have to eat year found, no matter what the water temperature is. But around here it is more considered as a thing done in the summer.

I mentioned jubilees which happen on the eastern shore of Mobile bay and some people might not have heard of them. They happen between June and September with August normally the high point. They usually start about four hours before daylight and end around dawn after a fresh rain with an east wind on an incoming tide. Flounders, shrimp, and crabs gather up and just try to climb out of the water. You can just pick up buckets full of flounder and truck loads of crabs in a matter of minutes.

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from country road wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Santa, that is a great idea about the styrofoam lid. I've only been floundering a couple of times and that was with folks who knew what they were doing---I couldn't spot the flounder before they gigged them. Someday, I'll experience a jubilee.

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from redfishunter wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Good stuff Santa. Thanks. Tide will be starting to fall early afternoon this week , with low tide real early in morning. So looks like I'll be goin out at about 4.a.m.

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from santa wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Country, I used to keep a small aluminum flat bottom bateau at Safe Harbor Marina and did a lot of floundering Old River, Cotton Bayou, and around Walker Island back at the time you had the charter business. I would many a time beach the bateau and walk across the road to the FloraBama for refreshments then flounder the resh of the ..burp.. night. I often made more money selling flounder, than working a regular job.

PS, Flounder will sometimes bury up until the only thing you see are the eyes, so it just takes a lot of experience to see them.

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from Frederick Kiah ... wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I am here in North Carolina where the flounder gigging is truly great. The best time to go is late night really. Just make sure you have some good lights. www.FlounderGiggingLight.com has some new LED lights out that are really great and don't cost all that much. Check them out, they make going at night really easy and a lot of fun!

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from santa wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Sorry about the second post, but in the first post, I forgot the part of the question about when to flounder. Flounder go to shallow water to feed and can even be found in as little as two inch deep water. They bed up on the bottom and blend in to catch prey. As the tide comes in, they move in with it, but they quickly move back out to deep water when the tide first starts to go back out so that they do not end up caught out in the shallows, high and dry. Flounders leave a track as they move in. You can see the places on the bottom where they have bed and when they leave that place the fins leave a trail on the bottom that can be followed to the next place they bed. High and low tide times change each day so the best time to flounder also changes each day. Flounder have to eat year found, no matter what the water temperature is. But around here it is more considered as a thing done in the summer.

I mentioned jubilees which happen on the eastern shore of Mobile bay and some people might not have heard of them. They happen between June and September with August normally the high point. They usually start about four hours before daylight and end around dawn after a fresh rain with an east wind on an incoming tide. Flounders, shrimp, and crabs gather up and just try to climb out of the water. You can just pick up buckets full of flounder and truck loads of crabs in a matter of minutes.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from santa wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

I have two old Coleman double mantle gas lanterns that were modified with aluminum dish pans for reflectors. I have always used them when wading and walking for flounder as well as at jubilees on the eastern shore of Mobile bay. They also come in handy during hurricanes for emergency light. When in a boat, I use 12 volt light bulbs in a rubber pigtails under water. For simi-muddy or cloudy water, I change to 32 volt bulbs but still only use a 12 volt battery. The 32 volt bulb will put out a much dimmer light and you can see better with the bad water conditions. I have mine rigged on a hinged arm with the bulb sticking out the bottom of a lid off a styrofoam cooler which is wrapped in aluminum foil. That way the light bulb is under water but still floats at the surface so that it doesn't ever hit the bottom. But a lot of people just rig a bulb and pigtail in a coffee can on a stick and just "C" clamp it to the boat.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from santa wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Country, I used to keep a small aluminum flat bottom bateau at Safe Harbor Marina and did a lot of floundering Old River, Cotton Bayou, and around Walker Island back at the time you had the charter business. I would many a time beach the bateau and walk across the road to the FloraBama for refreshments then flounder the resh of the ..burp.. night. I often made more money selling flounder, than working a regular job.

PS, Flounder will sometimes bury up until the only thing you see are the eyes, so it just takes a lot of experience to see them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from redfishunter wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Also, any suggestions on a cheap gig light? Or how to rig one up with a normal light?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Santa, that is a great idea about the styrofoam lid. I've only been floundering a couple of times and that was with folks who knew what they were doing---I couldn't spot the flounder before they gigged them. Someday, I'll experience a jubilee.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from redfishunter wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Good stuff Santa. Thanks. Tide will be starting to fall early afternoon this week , with low tide real early in morning. So looks like I'll be goin out at about 4.a.m.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Frederick Kiah ... wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I am here in North Carolina where the flounder gigging is truly great. The best time to go is late night really. Just make sure you have some good lights. www.FlounderGiggingLight.com has some new LED lights out that are really great and don't cost all that much. Check them out, they make going at night really easy and a lot of fun!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

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