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Q:
.41 MAGNUM?

Question by mspl8sdcntryboy. Uploaded on November 27, 2012

Answers (16)

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from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Hi...

Did you have a question?

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from 357 wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

.41 has killed a few things.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

It was conceived as a police load that would approach the .44 Magnum in performance with recoil comparable to the .357 Magnum.
Ammo was supposed to be available in two loadings, a mild one for practice and target shooting, and a hot one for duty.
However, the ammo manufacturers came out with the hot load first, and it made a very unfavorable impression on the shooting public. It was not well publicized that a milder loading would be available.
The round was a failure commercially, but shooters who preferred the hotter load anyway bought their Model 57s and 58s, which today are trading at collector prices.
It is a good hunting round, and an excellent police round for officers who can handle the recoil.
I don't know if the milder loading was ever produced.

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Thanks 99, the .41 seemed to me like a good caliber, just wanted to get some other peoples opinions on it, it seems like a very underrated caliber for hunting and personal defense.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Top drawer caliber. Not as much recoil as a .44 Mag and more punch than a .357 mag. Downside is that it is chambered in large frame revolvers.

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from crm3006 wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Only downside to a .41 Mag is that to my knowlege, no one makes a shot cup or shot round for it. The .41 is a better option to me than the .44 Mag. because though both revolvers are the same, the .41 is the more accurate of the two. More power than the .357 Mag. I like mine, but if anyone knows of a source for shot cups, or loaded snake rounds, I would like to hear about it.

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from Ol Krusty wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

44 mag.

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

I've owned three .41 Magnum sidearms, a S&W Model 57, a Ruger Blackhawk and a T-C "Contender", all of which served me well. I required nothing more and I continue to recommend the cartridge for accurate performance on steel targets and medium game.

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Thanks Edward, the .41 magnum seems like it would do anything you ask it to, I remember seeing a .41 magnum lever action rifle by Marlin before, I don't believe it is still in prod. but what would you think of it in a rifle?

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

I remember that Marlin! By the time I'd set funds aside for it, it was unattainable. They sold out in my locale and the production run ended. I think the .41 Magnum in a lever action like that would have been a superb companion piece for a handgun and certainly adequate for deer. I handload, and I enjoyed playing with the .41 because it covered the spectrum from mild loads with cast or swaged bullets to stout loads with jacketed bullets that hammered those steel targets handily. I'd gotten good accuracy at 100 yds with the Sierra 170 gr. JHC fueled by Blue Dot or Unique powder. I hope you enjoy it as much as I.

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Edward, I found that Marlin on Gunbroker.com, $1100.00, I couldn't believe my eyes! It would probably be cheaper to get Kenny Jarrett to re-barrel a .44 or .357 magnum to the .41 chambering!

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Despite the limited production run (and what appears to be a closed window of opportunity), I think $1100 for that lever action carbine is very difficult to justify. I recently paid $385 for a (lightly used) Model 1894 in .357 Magnum.
I agree with you, it's overpriced...and I'd shift those resources to a different shooting priority before I'd spend it like that.

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Despite the limited production run (and what appears to be a closed window of opportunity), I think $1100 for that lever action carbine is very difficult to justify. I recently paid $385 for a (lightly used) Model 1894 in .357 Magnum.
I agree with you, it's overpriced...and I'd shift those resources to a different shooting priority before I'd spend it like that.

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

The only time I would pay $1100.00 for a rifle is if it is a first run Winchester '73 or '94. But it must have been either a very desired gun or despised gun for prod. to stop that fast. Maybe I can find one at a gun show for cheaper, I am certainly not opposed to buying used as long as it doesn't look like the previous owner used it in the battle of the bulge!

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Normally, they make a conservative estimate of how many units they can sell, set up for a cost-effective production run, and that's all they'll produce. It's rare that a limited production run will be extended unless there's a prompt and significant response to do so. In the '90s, USRAC made a limited production run of Model 70s in .250 Savage and sold all of them, but made no more. Ruger is one of the more responsive manufacturers and, when they receive enough correspondence or input, they've been very good about assessing consumer demand. I think it's worthwhile to write Marlin's sales & marketing department with a suggestion or inquiry and, if they get enough of them, they may respond...but it won't be happen quickly.

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Yeah, I guess that unless the manufacturer receives early sales stats on the products, that they were selling extremely fast, they wouldn't extend manufacturing beyond normal time. And you are correct in saying Ruger is one of the best in prod. responses, in accordance to customer demand. The Ruger American is a great example of this, along with the Scout rifle.

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

I remember that Marlin! By the time I'd set funds aside for it, it was unattainable. They sold out in my locale and the production run ended. I think the .41 Magnum in a lever action like that would have been a superb companion piece for a handgun and certainly adequate for deer. I handload, and I enjoyed playing with the .41 because it covered the spectrum from mild loads with cast or swaged bullets to stout loads with jacketed bullets that hammered those steel targets handily. I'd gotten good accuracy at 100 yds with the Sierra 170 gr. JHC fueled by Blue Dot or Unique powder. I hope you enjoy it as much as I.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Hi...

Did you have a question?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

It was conceived as a police load that would approach the .44 Magnum in performance with recoil comparable to the .357 Magnum.
Ammo was supposed to be available in two loadings, a mild one for practice and target shooting, and a hot one for duty.
However, the ammo manufacturers came out with the hot load first, and it made a very unfavorable impression on the shooting public. It was not well publicized that a milder loading would be available.
The round was a failure commercially, but shooters who preferred the hotter load anyway bought their Model 57s and 58s, which today are trading at collector prices.
It is a good hunting round, and an excellent police round for officers who can handle the recoil.
I don't know if the milder loading was ever produced.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

I've owned three .41 Magnum sidearms, a S&W Model 57, a Ruger Blackhawk and a T-C "Contender", all of which served me well. I required nothing more and I continue to recommend the cartridge for accurate performance on steel targets and medium game.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Despite the limited production run (and what appears to be a closed window of opportunity), I think $1100 for that lever action carbine is very difficult to justify. I recently paid $385 for a (lightly used) Model 1894 in .357 Magnum.
I agree with you, it's overpriced...and I'd shift those resources to a different shooting priority before I'd spend it like that.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Despite the limited production run (and what appears to be a closed window of opportunity), I think $1100 for that lever action carbine is very difficult to justify. I recently paid $385 for a (lightly used) Model 1894 in .357 Magnum.
I agree with you, it's overpriced...and I'd shift those resources to a different shooting priority before I'd spend it like that.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Normally, they make a conservative estimate of how many units they can sell, set up for a cost-effective production run, and that's all they'll produce. It's rare that a limited production run will be extended unless there's a prompt and significant response to do so. In the '90s, USRAC made a limited production run of Model 70s in .250 Savage and sold all of them, but made no more. Ruger is one of the more responsive manufacturers and, when they receive enough correspondence or input, they've been very good about assessing consumer demand. I think it's worthwhile to write Marlin's sales & marketing department with a suggestion or inquiry and, if they get enough of them, they may respond...but it won't be happen quickly.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 357 wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

.41 has killed a few things.

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Thanks 99, the .41 seemed to me like a good caliber, just wanted to get some other peoples opinions on it, it seems like a very underrated caliber for hunting and personal defense.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Top drawer caliber. Not as much recoil as a .44 Mag and more punch than a .357 mag. Downside is that it is chambered in large frame revolvers.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Only downside to a .41 Mag is that to my knowlege, no one makes a shot cup or shot round for it. The .41 is a better option to me than the .44 Mag. because though both revolvers are the same, the .41 is the more accurate of the two. More power than the .357 Mag. I like mine, but if anyone knows of a source for shot cups, or loaded snake rounds, I would like to hear about it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ol Krusty wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

44 mag.

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Thanks Edward, the .41 magnum seems like it would do anything you ask it to, I remember seeing a .41 magnum lever action rifle by Marlin before, I don't believe it is still in prod. but what would you think of it in a rifle?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Edward, I found that Marlin on Gunbroker.com, $1100.00, I couldn't believe my eyes! It would probably be cheaper to get Kenny Jarrett to re-barrel a .44 or .357 magnum to the .41 chambering!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

The only time I would pay $1100.00 for a rifle is if it is a first run Winchester '73 or '94. But it must have been either a very desired gun or despised gun for prod. to stop that fast. Maybe I can find one at a gun show for cheaper, I am certainly not opposed to buying used as long as it doesn't look like the previous owner used it in the battle of the bulge!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Yeah, I guess that unless the manufacturer receives early sales stats on the products, that they were selling extremely fast, they wouldn't extend manufacturing beyond normal time. And you are correct in saying Ruger is one of the best in prod. responses, in accordance to customer demand. The Ruger American is a great example of this, along with the Scout rifle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer