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Q:
.250 Savage? Any info at all on this caliber? Balistics? Is it fairly easy to find ammo for?

Question by wvboy1022. Uploaded on March 20, 2010

Answers (15)

Top Rated
All Answers
from 788Ham wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

The only info I can pass on is about the Savage ' 99 .250. This is the first cartridge to achieve the 3000 fps threshold with an 87 grain bullet. Most bullets in the 87 to 115 grain pills can be around 2800 to 2900 fps, good enough to hunt deer sized game with, also the 87 gr. can be used for small game, coyotes to P-dogs. Yes, depending on the part of the country you live i, out West here, the ammo is fairly easy to find, some parts of the country, Okla. and down your way, the ammo should be easy to find also. The .250 is a good round, my Grandpa used one for many, many years, shot deer, elk and bear with his in the 30's-50's with his, the 100 grain bullet hits hard! Hope this helps you.

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

250 Savage History and General Information.

The 250 Savage was introduced by savage in 1914 as the 250-3000 Savage capable of achieving 3,000 feet per second velocity with a 87 grain 25 caliber bullet, years later the 3,000 was dropped to become the 250 Savage.

The original designer of the 250 savage was Charles Newton who had sold his cartridge rights to Savage. Mr. Newton had designed the 250 Savage to be loaded with a 100 grain bullet with a velocity of 2,800 feet per second, at which he claimed that the best accuracy and killing power of the cartridge would be realized.

The 250 Savage is a dual purpose cartridge it can be used for varmints sending a 75 grain bullet out the muzzle at 3,200 fps., making this a good varmint round or it can be used as a big game cartridge sending 100 grain bullets out the muzzle at speeds of 2,800 fps., it has sufficient power out to the 250 yard mark for deer sized game animals.

The 250 savage has been chambered over the years in several different rifle action types with different rifling twist rates in the barrels and they range from the original Savage model 99 lever action 1 in 14" twist to Savage model 110 1 in 10" twist.

The 250 Savage with the accuracy, power and effectiveness it offers down range recoils very little to the shooters shoulder and is highly recommended for youth and recoil conscious shooters, if ever the case was to be made for a highly accurate and effective light weight youth rifle cartridge the 250 Savage would be the best choice of all currently manufactured rifle cartridges.

250 Savage Barrel Specifications.
Common Barrel Twist Rate - 1/14 - 1/12 - 1/10
Bore Groove Diameter - .257"

250 Savage Reloading Specifications.
Bullet Diameter - .257"
Maximum Case Length - 1.912"
Trimmed Case Length - 1.902"
Primer Size - Large Rifle

250 Savage Loading Data Hints.
The 250 Savage responds well to faster burning powders such as i.m.r. 3031, 4064 and 4320. When reloading for the 250 Savage cartridge it is a real good idea to check the rifling twist rate as this will have a big effect on accuracy. 1 in 14" twist will give excellent accuracy with the lighter bullets available and the 1 in 10" twist does its best with the heavier bullets available.

250 Savage Reloading Data.
Hodgdon Reloading Data Center.

250 Savage Trajectory and Hunting Applications.

This is a down range trajectory chart for the 250 Savage cartridge with the scope mounted 1.5 inches above the bore center line plus if you were using this load, its effective hunting bullet energy range with well placed shots on,
Varmint / Predator size game, such as Bobcat, Cougar, Coyote.
Deer size game, such as Antelope, Blacktail, Hogs, Javelina, Mule, Whitetail.
Elk size game, such as Caribou, Black Bear, Sheep.
Moose size game, such as Brown Bear.
Bullet diameter .257"
Bullet weight 100 grains
Bullet ballistic coeffecient .357
Bullet velocity 2,900 feet per second
Range

100 yds.

200 yds.

300 yds.

400 yds.

500 yds.

+

+ 1.8

0

- 8.0

- 23.8

- 49.5

1540

1261

1026

830

667

Varmint
+

+

+

+

+

+
Deer
+

+

-

-

-

-
Elk
-

-

-

-

-

-
Moose
-

-

-

-

-

-

Copyright 2001 - 2010
By Cabelas

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from wvboy1022 wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

Thanks both. I was on the internet and saw a few rifles chambered for it. I've heard of it before, but never thought to much about it.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

250 Savage is fantastic in the Savage model 99. But if your looking for a bolt gun, I'd go with the 25-06. 250 Savage is not easy to find and 25-06 is plentiful. The 25-06 out performs the 250 Savage and is fantastic for long range shooting. It's like crossing the performance of the trajectory of a 22-250 with the knockdown power of a 270 Winchester. I sold my 300 Win Mag back in 1980 and replaced it with a 25-06 and never regretted it. My 30-06 does just fine on large animals and if there comes a Water Buffalo, I got my 338 Win Mag! Anyone seen any Water Buffalo running around the Ozarks lately?

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from ADKHunter wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

i dont know much but if its hard to get ammo than go to midwayusa

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

The 250 savage is a fine old classic. I can't add anything that hasn't already been said except to say that I dreamed of one of these in a Savage 99 for many years. I have one now and love this little round. I believe that it is a better round with the 85 gr. bullet than many would give it credit for.

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

I have a Winchester Model 70 Lightweight Carbine in .250 Savage, and it is one of the best choices I'd made in 45+ years of shooting. It isn't my first .250, but I sold the first (a Savage Model 99) and regretted it. When Winchester came up with a limited production run of .250s in the early '90s, I bought one and I won't let this one go. Varmints or deer, the .250 will take care of it. The Nosler 85-grain Ballistic Tip is my favorite coyote antidote. This bolt action groups very tightly, handles well, points easily. I handload, so I purchase brass 50-100 at a time from Midway Arms. Several powders are appropriate for this versatile cartridge.
There are choices you swear by, and choices you swear at. The .250 Savage has consistently given me better performance than I expected.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

I think you would enjoy any of the .25 caliber cartriges as they all have great ballistics. They are fast, hit amazingly hard and have hardly any recoil. They are all ideal for hunting everything from prairie dogs to deer. I personally like the 25-06 because of a little more speed in hitting running game and for longer range shooting but the .250 is a great cartridge, especially if you want a light handy rifle (although my current 25-06 weighs 5.5 pounds). Most stores across America will have more 25-06 stocked than .250 Savage but depending on where you live and shop, you may be able to find it. I would suggest that you consider loading your own to really enjoy a .25 caliber. I also suggest you load some 75g bullets (Hornady VMAX are great) to experience SPEED! They are great for varmints up to coyotes. They are plenty for antelope too but will tear up too much meat in an antelope. The 85g Nosler EJP mentioned above is a great bullet too. Use 90g or 100g Barnes or 100g Hornadys for deer and you will be impressed. Have fun and good hunting!

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

DakotaMan brings up a valid point: The .25-'06 will reach out further and it's unquestionably a more popular cartridge. I've owned two bolt actions chambered for the .257 Roberts, and preferred the .25-'06 to the Roberts. The .250 Savage is a great cartridge for short (.22-250/.243/.308/7mm-08) actions. If you have a long action, I'd opt for the .25-'06.
For its size and case capacity, the .250 Savage is a very efficient cartridge that has served me with greater versatility and better results than the .243 sporterweight rifles I've owned.
Depending on your intent or need, I would not recommend the .250 Savage over the .25-'06 but, for its size, you'd be amazed what the .250 will accomplish. In truth, if you don't handload, you won't get the optimum performance the .250 can deliver...and that holds true for a number of cartridges.
I haven't shopped for .250 Savage factory ammunition in years, and I candidly don't know how readily available it may be. In the recent past, I'm surprised how little I find on the shelves of previously well-stocked retailers. However, the brass is still available from sources like Midway and others, and the .250 is a well-balanced cartridge (i.e., not overbore or underbore) that burns its recommended powder capacity efficiently. I normally rely on IMR-3031 and H380, but I've gotten good results with others as well.
These days, I am primarily a varminter. Consequently, my rifles get a steady diet of light, fast bullets that group well and deliver good results. I carry a decent supply of coyote medicine, but I go through a few boxes of heavier bullets as well. I have not had good results with 120-grain bullets; it doesn't appear my .250 stabilizes them well.
I wish the best of luck with whatever you choose or obtain.
Ed

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 4 weeks ago

Wow..Good detailed information Moishe and A + 1 for you sir!!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 4 years 4 weeks ago

Great job boy's you sed it all, I wish i had one.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from taterslip wrote 3 years 24 weeks ago

I actually own one and love it. It was given to me by my dad when I was 12. I have taken multiple deer with it and have had no issues or problems. I do have a small problem finding ammo from time to time but always manage to find a couple of boxes. I started my son and grandson hunting with this rifle and they both love it.

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from Lmwinery wrote 3 years 22 weeks ago

I own 7 different .250's. I learned to hunt with a 99CD and took my first rifle deer with it. Along came a Remington 700 Classic. The number of critters taken with this rifle is uncountable. As a reloader, this cartridge is the most flexible I have loaded. I have shot deer with 115 gr partitions, 100 Grain Hornady Interlocks, turkeys and all sorts of small game (when it was legal to do so) with 90 grain barnes solids (Reduced loads using SR-4759). All but three deer were dead within 30 yards of where they were shot. 2 required a finish shot. Ranges were to 300 yards. On varmints from groundhogs to coyotes it's lights out. Eastern Coyotes are big and tough. A far superior cartridge to the 22-250 with a 75 grain hornady sst. Accuracy, in my experience, only the 22 and 6ppc beat it. Would i hunt black bear with it? probably not. But any deer species, antelope, and caribou are no match. For factory ammo, use the winchester silver tip. If you want to sell the gun, let me know

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from SAVAGE ONE wrote 3 years 16 weeks ago

Yes its easy to reload for. Find ammo? Well its not as easy as it used to be. I think only Rimington still makes 100gr corelock ammo. Winchester still might make it. Winchester used to manufacture 87gr sp ammo. Brass is available every once and a while from Rimington and Winchester sometimes you find norma runs as well as custom ammo makes. So if you reload just buy 50ct. bag of W-W brass and 50ct bag of Rimington you should be good to go. Ever which one your rifle likes buy more of it.
I have a custom 250 savage 1-10 twist, 26" bbl, synthetic stock, M98 action. It shoots 120gr hpbt sierra's like 7/16" inch 5 shot groups or less at 100yds with a velocity about 2600fps.
It shoots 100 gr spbt sierra's just as well. These loads were not neck sized only either. As for Varmints well 75gr sierra at about 3300 will do just fine it tears coyotes up. I seen that the new IMR 8208 XBR has a loading for the 250 savage of 37gr at 43,200psi with a velocity of 3,362fps. This may be a good powder to try next and I just ordered neck sizing dies today. In strong modern bolt actions you can go a little further. But watch you pressure indicators. My 10lb rifle has little recoil especially with the 120's its a very soft push. My rifle with well placed shots will kill deer 200-250 yards just fine with 75gr, 90gr and up to 100gr bullets that I have used. I just never shot any deer further than that yet.

Have fun and practice a lot. Them 250 savages are fun to shoot, low recoil and noise, and very efficient cartridges.

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from kiwishooter54 wrote 1 week 23 hours ago

I own a .250-3000 savage that my grandfather bought in 1921.I was told that they were used in the first world war. The ammo now is difficult to
get but easy to reload. I have just been given 140 rounds about 40yrs old which works ok. The barrel is extremely worn keyholing on the 3rd shot . hence only used on red deer for the freeze. I would love another barrel

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

250 Savage History and General Information.

The 250 Savage was introduced by savage in 1914 as the 250-3000 Savage capable of achieving 3,000 feet per second velocity with a 87 grain 25 caliber bullet, years later the 3,000 was dropped to become the 250 Savage.

The original designer of the 250 savage was Charles Newton who had sold his cartridge rights to Savage. Mr. Newton had designed the 250 Savage to be loaded with a 100 grain bullet with a velocity of 2,800 feet per second, at which he claimed that the best accuracy and killing power of the cartridge would be realized.

The 250 Savage is a dual purpose cartridge it can be used for varmints sending a 75 grain bullet out the muzzle at 3,200 fps., making this a good varmint round or it can be used as a big game cartridge sending 100 grain bullets out the muzzle at speeds of 2,800 fps., it has sufficient power out to the 250 yard mark for deer sized game animals.

The 250 savage has been chambered over the years in several different rifle action types with different rifling twist rates in the barrels and they range from the original Savage model 99 lever action 1 in 14" twist to Savage model 110 1 in 10" twist.

The 250 Savage with the accuracy, power and effectiveness it offers down range recoils very little to the shooters shoulder and is highly recommended for youth and recoil conscious shooters, if ever the case was to be made for a highly accurate and effective light weight youth rifle cartridge the 250 Savage would be the best choice of all currently manufactured rifle cartridges.

250 Savage Barrel Specifications.
Common Barrel Twist Rate - 1/14 - 1/12 - 1/10
Bore Groove Diameter - .257"

250 Savage Reloading Specifications.
Bullet Diameter - .257"
Maximum Case Length - 1.912"
Trimmed Case Length - 1.902"
Primer Size - Large Rifle

250 Savage Loading Data Hints.
The 250 Savage responds well to faster burning powders such as i.m.r. 3031, 4064 and 4320. When reloading for the 250 Savage cartridge it is a real good idea to check the rifling twist rate as this will have a big effect on accuracy. 1 in 14" twist will give excellent accuracy with the lighter bullets available and the 1 in 10" twist does its best with the heavier bullets available.

250 Savage Reloading Data.
Hodgdon Reloading Data Center.

250 Savage Trajectory and Hunting Applications.

This is a down range trajectory chart for the 250 Savage cartridge with the scope mounted 1.5 inches above the bore center line plus if you were using this load, its effective hunting bullet energy range with well placed shots on,
Varmint / Predator size game, such as Bobcat, Cougar, Coyote.
Deer size game, such as Antelope, Blacktail, Hogs, Javelina, Mule, Whitetail.
Elk size game, such as Caribou, Black Bear, Sheep.
Moose size game, such as Brown Bear.
Bullet diameter .257"
Bullet weight 100 grains
Bullet ballistic coeffecient .357
Bullet velocity 2,900 feet per second
Range

100 yds.

200 yds.

300 yds.

400 yds.

500 yds.

+

+ 1.8

0

- 8.0

- 23.8

- 49.5

1540

1261

1026

830

667

Varmint
+

+

+

+

+

+
Deer
+

+

-

-

-

-
Elk
-

-

-

-

-

-
Moose
-

-

-

-

-

-

Copyright 2001 - 2010
By Cabelas

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from wvboy1022 wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

Thanks both. I was on the internet and saw a few rifles chambered for it. I've heard of it before, but never thought to much about it.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ADKHunter wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

i dont know much but if its hard to get ammo than go to midwayusa

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

The 250 savage is a fine old classic. I can't add anything that hasn't already been said except to say that I dreamed of one of these in a Savage 99 for many years. I have one now and love this little round. I believe that it is a better round with the 85 gr. bullet than many would give it credit for.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from 788Ham wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

The only info I can pass on is about the Savage ' 99 .250. This is the first cartridge to achieve the 3000 fps threshold with an 87 grain bullet. Most bullets in the 87 to 115 grain pills can be around 2800 to 2900 fps, good enough to hunt deer sized game with, also the 87 gr. can be used for small game, coyotes to P-dogs. Yes, depending on the part of the country you live i, out West here, the ammo is fairly easy to find, some parts of the country, Okla. and down your way, the ammo should be easy to find also. The .250 is a good round, my Grandpa used one for many, many years, shot deer, elk and bear with his in the 30's-50's with his, the 100 grain bullet hits hard! Hope this helps you.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

250 Savage is fantastic in the Savage model 99. But if your looking for a bolt gun, I'd go with the 25-06. 250 Savage is not easy to find and 25-06 is plentiful. The 25-06 out performs the 250 Savage and is fantastic for long range shooting. It's like crossing the performance of the trajectory of a 22-250 with the knockdown power of a 270 Winchester. I sold my 300 Win Mag back in 1980 and replaced it with a 25-06 and never regretted it. My 30-06 does just fine on large animals and if there comes a Water Buffalo, I got my 338 Win Mag! Anyone seen any Water Buffalo running around the Ozarks lately?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

DakotaMan brings up a valid point: The .25-'06 will reach out further and it's unquestionably a more popular cartridge. I've owned two bolt actions chambered for the .257 Roberts, and preferred the .25-'06 to the Roberts. The .250 Savage is a great cartridge for short (.22-250/.243/.308/7mm-08) actions. If you have a long action, I'd opt for the .25-'06.
For its size and case capacity, the .250 Savage is a very efficient cartridge that has served me with greater versatility and better results than the .243 sporterweight rifles I've owned.
Depending on your intent or need, I would not recommend the .250 Savage over the .25-'06 but, for its size, you'd be amazed what the .250 will accomplish. In truth, if you don't handload, you won't get the optimum performance the .250 can deliver...and that holds true for a number of cartridges.
I haven't shopped for .250 Savage factory ammunition in years, and I candidly don't know how readily available it may be. In the recent past, I'm surprised how little I find on the shelves of previously well-stocked retailers. However, the brass is still available from sources like Midway and others, and the .250 is a well-balanced cartridge (i.e., not overbore or underbore) that burns its recommended powder capacity efficiently. I normally rely on IMR-3031 and H380, but I've gotten good results with others as well.
These days, I am primarily a varminter. Consequently, my rifles get a steady diet of light, fast bullets that group well and deliver good results. I carry a decent supply of coyote medicine, but I go through a few boxes of heavier bullets as well. I have not had good results with 120-grain bullets; it doesn't appear my .250 stabilizes them well.
I wish the best of luck with whatever you choose or obtain.
Ed

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 4 weeks ago

Wow..Good detailed information Moishe and A + 1 for you sir!!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

I have a Winchester Model 70 Lightweight Carbine in .250 Savage, and it is one of the best choices I'd made in 45+ years of shooting. It isn't my first .250, but I sold the first (a Savage Model 99) and regretted it. When Winchester came up with a limited production run of .250s in the early '90s, I bought one and I won't let this one go. Varmints or deer, the .250 will take care of it. The Nosler 85-grain Ballistic Tip is my favorite coyote antidote. This bolt action groups very tightly, handles well, points easily. I handload, so I purchase brass 50-100 at a time from Midway Arms. Several powders are appropriate for this versatile cartridge.
There are choices you swear by, and choices you swear at. The .250 Savage has consistently given me better performance than I expected.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 5 weeks ago

I think you would enjoy any of the .25 caliber cartriges as they all have great ballistics. They are fast, hit amazingly hard and have hardly any recoil. They are all ideal for hunting everything from prairie dogs to deer. I personally like the 25-06 because of a little more speed in hitting running game and for longer range shooting but the .250 is a great cartridge, especially if you want a light handy rifle (although my current 25-06 weighs 5.5 pounds). Most stores across America will have more 25-06 stocked than .250 Savage but depending on where you live and shop, you may be able to find it. I would suggest that you consider loading your own to really enjoy a .25 caliber. I also suggest you load some 75g bullets (Hornady VMAX are great) to experience SPEED! They are great for varmints up to coyotes. They are plenty for antelope too but will tear up too much meat in an antelope. The 85g Nosler EJP mentioned above is a great bullet too. Use 90g or 100g Barnes or 100g Hornadys for deer and you will be impressed. Have fun and good hunting!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 4 years 4 weeks ago

Great job boy's you sed it all, I wish i had one.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from taterslip wrote 3 years 24 weeks ago

I actually own one and love it. It was given to me by my dad when I was 12. I have taken multiple deer with it and have had no issues or problems. I do have a small problem finding ammo from time to time but always manage to find a couple of boxes. I started my son and grandson hunting with this rifle and they both love it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lmwinery wrote 3 years 22 weeks ago

I own 7 different .250's. I learned to hunt with a 99CD and took my first rifle deer with it. Along came a Remington 700 Classic. The number of critters taken with this rifle is uncountable. As a reloader, this cartridge is the most flexible I have loaded. I have shot deer with 115 gr partitions, 100 Grain Hornady Interlocks, turkeys and all sorts of small game (when it was legal to do so) with 90 grain barnes solids (Reduced loads using SR-4759). All but three deer were dead within 30 yards of where they were shot. 2 required a finish shot. Ranges were to 300 yards. On varmints from groundhogs to coyotes it's lights out. Eastern Coyotes are big and tough. A far superior cartridge to the 22-250 with a 75 grain hornady sst. Accuracy, in my experience, only the 22 and 6ppc beat it. Would i hunt black bear with it? probably not. But any deer species, antelope, and caribou are no match. For factory ammo, use the winchester silver tip. If you want to sell the gun, let me know

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from SAVAGE ONE wrote 3 years 16 weeks ago

Yes its easy to reload for. Find ammo? Well its not as easy as it used to be. I think only Rimington still makes 100gr corelock ammo. Winchester still might make it. Winchester used to manufacture 87gr sp ammo. Brass is available every once and a while from Rimington and Winchester sometimes you find norma runs as well as custom ammo makes. So if you reload just buy 50ct. bag of W-W brass and 50ct bag of Rimington you should be good to go. Ever which one your rifle likes buy more of it.
I have a custom 250 savage 1-10 twist, 26" bbl, synthetic stock, M98 action. It shoots 120gr hpbt sierra's like 7/16" inch 5 shot groups or less at 100yds with a velocity about 2600fps.
It shoots 100 gr spbt sierra's just as well. These loads were not neck sized only either. As for Varmints well 75gr sierra at about 3300 will do just fine it tears coyotes up. I seen that the new IMR 8208 XBR has a loading for the 250 savage of 37gr at 43,200psi with a velocity of 3,362fps. This may be a good powder to try next and I just ordered neck sizing dies today. In strong modern bolt actions you can go a little further. But watch you pressure indicators. My 10lb rifle has little recoil especially with the 120's its a very soft push. My rifle with well placed shots will kill deer 200-250 yards just fine with 75gr, 90gr and up to 100gr bullets that I have used. I just never shot any deer further than that yet.

Have fun and practice a lot. Them 250 savages are fun to shoot, low recoil and noise, and very efficient cartridges.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kiwishooter54 wrote 1 week 23 hours ago

I own a .250-3000 savage that my grandfather bought in 1921.I was told that they were used in the first world war. The ammo now is difficult to
get but easy to reload. I have just been given 140 rounds about 40yrs old which works ok. The barrel is extremely worn keyholing on the 3rd shot . hence only used on red deer for the freeze. I would love another barrel

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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