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Q:
is a 30-30 winchester a good big game rifle

Question by ab130656. Uploaded on January 07, 2011

Answers (13)

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

The .30-30 Winchester is a good deer and bear rifle at modest ranges. I don't recommend it for elk at anything but the closest of ranges.

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from ab130656 wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

so what is a good elk rifle

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from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

You betcha it is. It's probably taken more deer then the next 2 guns combined. on the other question .30-06, 7mm , 6.5, .280 there is a vas number of good Elk guns given the proper conditions even the mild 30-30 has and will take Elk. I said it before and I will say it again. It is more about where you hunt and shot placement then caliber. A 45-70 gov is hard to beat at close range on just about anything that breaths

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from ab130656 wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

thanks for your info

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from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

In the book by Capstick, "The Last Ivory Hunter", he speaks (writes?) at length about when Wally first arrived in Africa. Wally and a pal decided to become lion hunters. They killed quite a few lions before somebody informed them the Winchester Mod 94 .30-30 was a bit light for lion!
The Winchester .30-30 is a very under rated cartridge.
Because of SAAMI, the .30-30 factory load is literally horrible. By handloading the .30-30 for a modern rifle in good condition, you might be surprised just what it's capable of.
Basically, everybody above is quite correct. Whitetails out to 100/125 yards, mulies about the same. Elk, like WAM stated, a bit closer, say 75 yards.
At close ranges, as a protection arm, a lever .30-30 is quite formidable!!

Bubba

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from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

The problem with all these old cartridges ie. 45 LC, 45-70, 30-30 is that they can be shot out of old guns, hence the cannot be factory loaded to their potential. I did see a very good shot at close range kill a Bison on TV. This is the exception to the rule.

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from jamesti wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

my first three deer were taken with a 30-30. still have that rifle.

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from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

Carl have you hear they are making new guns nowadays in .45LC, 45-70 and even the 30-30? Even 12 gauge shotguns without damscus barrels on them. They just might be able to withstand higher pressures. Anyone hear about the Guide gun that came out in 45-70? Betcha that can handle a few bears in the woods.Huh?

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from JImp wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

I believe that point that Carl was making was that manufacturers have to build a round that is safe for a 100+ year old gun. They have no way of knowing the condition of the gun that is used. Can you understand product liability?

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from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

JImp I understand product liability. My point making is there have been advancements in firearm technology. And all of the cartridges he mentioned are useful and can be loaded to max performance for use in the correct gun. Older doesn't mean useless. Point in fact how long has the bb gun been around and look at the ammo still supplied for it. If the cartridge was dead, there wouldn't be any use or call for it new or old. They said it would never fly.

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from 99explorer wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

It is an absolutely a first-rate caliber for whitetail deer in the northeast, even in the mildest factory loadings.

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from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

deerhunterrick I think you misunderstand what I'm trying to say here. You can hand load any of old cartridges for increased range and terminal ballistics for use in a modern gun, but factory ammo has to be reduced loaded because it will still chamber in a 130 year old gun. Yes these old guns can still kill like they did in the old days, but today they can just do it better and further. As far as the BB gun goes I just saw a women Eventually kill a cow moose with several shots from a modern Camo pellet gun on Alaska Troopers. Not your old Red Rider

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from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

One more thing before I go the cartriges that went by the way side were [with the exception of the 22] were rimfire and needle fire cartridges because they could not be reloaded and were under powered, center fire and smokless powder changed this then came the advent of modern steel in the 20th century

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from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

In the book by Capstick, "The Last Ivory Hunter", he speaks (writes?) at length about when Wally first arrived in Africa. Wally and a pal decided to become lion hunters. They killed quite a few lions before somebody informed them the Winchester Mod 94 .30-30 was a bit light for lion!
The Winchester .30-30 is a very under rated cartridge.
Because of SAAMI, the .30-30 factory load is literally horrible. By handloading the .30-30 for a modern rifle in good condition, you might be surprised just what it's capable of.
Basically, everybody above is quite correct. Whitetails out to 100/125 yards, mulies about the same. Elk, like WAM stated, a bit closer, say 75 yards.
At close ranges, as a protection arm, a lever .30-30 is quite formidable!!

Bubba

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

The .30-30 Winchester is a good deer and bear rifle at modest ranges. I don't recommend it for elk at anything but the closest of ranges.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

You betcha it is. It's probably taken more deer then the next 2 guns combined. on the other question .30-06, 7mm , 6.5, .280 there is a vas number of good Elk guns given the proper conditions even the mild 30-30 has and will take Elk. I said it before and I will say it again. It is more about where you hunt and shot placement then caliber. A 45-70 gov is hard to beat at close range on just about anything that breaths

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

The problem with all these old cartridges ie. 45 LC, 45-70, 30-30 is that they can be shot out of old guns, hence the cannot be factory loaded to their potential. I did see a very good shot at close range kill a Bison on TV. This is the exception to the rule.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

my first three deer were taken with a 30-30. still have that rifle.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

Carl have you hear they are making new guns nowadays in .45LC, 45-70 and even the 30-30? Even 12 gauge shotguns without damscus barrels on them. They just might be able to withstand higher pressures. Anyone hear about the Guide gun that came out in 45-70? Betcha that can handle a few bears in the woods.Huh?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JImp wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

I believe that point that Carl was making was that manufacturers have to build a round that is safe for a 100+ year old gun. They have no way of knowing the condition of the gun that is used. Can you understand product liability?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

It is an absolutely a first-rate caliber for whitetail deer in the northeast, even in the mildest factory loadings.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

deerhunterrick I think you misunderstand what I'm trying to say here. You can hand load any of old cartridges for increased range and terminal ballistics for use in a modern gun, but factory ammo has to be reduced loaded because it will still chamber in a 130 year old gun. Yes these old guns can still kill like they did in the old days, but today they can just do it better and further. As far as the BB gun goes I just saw a women Eventually kill a cow moose with several shots from a modern Camo pellet gun on Alaska Troopers. Not your old Red Rider

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ab130656 wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

so what is a good elk rifle

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from ab130656 wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

thanks for your info

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from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

JImp I understand product liability. My point making is there have been advancements in firearm technology. And all of the cartridges he mentioned are useful and can be loaded to max performance for use in the correct gun. Older doesn't mean useless. Point in fact how long has the bb gun been around and look at the ammo still supplied for it. If the cartridge was dead, there wouldn't be any use or call for it new or old. They said it would never fly.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

One more thing before I go the cartriges that went by the way side were [with the exception of the 22] were rimfire and needle fire cartridges because they could not be reloaded and were under powered, center fire and smokless powder changed this then came the advent of modern steel in the 20th century

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Post an Answer

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