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Q:
Anyone have any experience with a .338 Edge and do you feel it has significant advantages over the .338 RUM? I wonder why Remington didn't make this cartridge in the first place.

Question by ishawooa. Uploaded on March 09, 2009

Answers (5)

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from shane wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

Advantages? Like the .338 Win Mag, the .338 RUM, and the .340 Wby. Mag, it sends medium-heavy bullets at high velocities along pretty flat trajectories on their way to killing the crap out of anything that isn't a Big 5 species.

In other news, who cares? I haven't heard of this cartridge, and I wish I never had to.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

ishawooa

I fired the 338 Win Mags, 340 Weatherby Mags and a 338 Wildcat that sizzled thru my chronograph at 3675ish with a 210 Nosler Partition Mag Ported 26 inch barrel. I have a 338 Win Mag and I’m completely satisfied with it and have no yearnings to go to a larger cartridge. I can confidently hit all the way out to 700 yards and far as I’m concerned it will do a better job than the larger cases because flinch factor etc. The problem I have found with the faster cartridges is the velocity is well above the maximum operation range of the bullet until it’s out around 175+ yards. Anything short of 175 yards, the bullet simply self destructs!

Bottom line, if you can handle the 300 Win Mag and hit long range with a 30-06 with a 165, the 338 Win Mag is the right choice. I rather have a 338 Win Mag rather than a 300 Win Mag!

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from ishawooa wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

Clay apparently your wildcat was something on the order of the Edge considering exterior ballistic performance. The Edge is simply the 7 mm or 300 RUM necked up to .300 rather than the shortened version refered to as the .338 RUM as Remington chose to market. For long range shooters that extra bit of interior room can make life a bit easier insofar as flattening trajectory. Increase in recoil for all those who are constantly whining about it is not noticeably different from a .338 Win to a .340 Wea. Some of the more recently developed bullets, although not totally devoid of the undesirable response of which you spoke, do hold up substancially better than older designs throughout the velocity spectrum. I suppose the Edge is best described as a .338 with a .300 trajectory without requiring a .338-.378 length action. Nice compromise for those you can use it.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

I'll stic to my 338 Win Mag Thank You!

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from ishawooa wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

I'll keep my .338 Win also but a little additional spice is enjoyable. The Edge will probably wind up being my kid's rifle somewhere along the way meanwhile I can have fun with it. Might even make a one shot kill on a good bull one fall day who knows?

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from shane wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

Advantages? Like the .338 Win Mag, the .338 RUM, and the .340 Wby. Mag, it sends medium-heavy bullets at high velocities along pretty flat trajectories on their way to killing the crap out of anything that isn't a Big 5 species.

In other news, who cares? I haven't heard of this cartridge, and I wish I never had to.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

ishawooa

I fired the 338 Win Mags, 340 Weatherby Mags and a 338 Wildcat that sizzled thru my chronograph at 3675ish with a 210 Nosler Partition Mag Ported 26 inch barrel. I have a 338 Win Mag and I’m completely satisfied with it and have no yearnings to go to a larger cartridge. I can confidently hit all the way out to 700 yards and far as I’m concerned it will do a better job than the larger cases because flinch factor etc. The problem I have found with the faster cartridges is the velocity is well above the maximum operation range of the bullet until it’s out around 175+ yards. Anything short of 175 yards, the bullet simply self destructs!

Bottom line, if you can handle the 300 Win Mag and hit long range with a 30-06 with a 165, the 338 Win Mag is the right choice. I rather have a 338 Win Mag rather than a 300 Win Mag!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

Clay apparently your wildcat was something on the order of the Edge considering exterior ballistic performance. The Edge is simply the 7 mm or 300 RUM necked up to .300 rather than the shortened version refered to as the .338 RUM as Remington chose to market. For long range shooters that extra bit of interior room can make life a bit easier insofar as flattening trajectory. Increase in recoil for all those who are constantly whining about it is not noticeably different from a .338 Win to a .340 Wea. Some of the more recently developed bullets, although not totally devoid of the undesirable response of which you spoke, do hold up substancially better than older designs throughout the velocity spectrum. I suppose the Edge is best described as a .338 with a .300 trajectory without requiring a .338-.378 length action. Nice compromise for those you can use it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

I'll stic to my 338 Win Mag Thank You!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

I'll keep my .338 Win also but a little additional spice is enjoyable. The Edge will probably wind up being my kid's rifle somewhere along the way meanwhile I can have fun with it. Might even make a one shot kill on a good bull one fall day who knows?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer