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Q:
Has anybody tried reloading .223 rounds for an AR type rifle with 80 or 90 grain bullets? Does anyobdy reccomend it? Would there be any problems feeding?

Question by jr9893. Uploaded on March 09, 2012

Answers (5)

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from hunt_fish_sleep wrote 2 years 6 weeks ago

What is the rate of twist on your barrel? 1 in 9" will not stabilize a bullet that heavy. 1 in 7" will do a better job. Heck, you may even keyhole with a 90 grain bullet in 1 in 7". Most basic AR-15s come with 1 in 9. Most custom jobs have 1 in 7". If you have 1 in 9" I would say save your time and money and just buy a .243 since that's basically what you're trying to replicate. Where did you find .22 Caliber bullets that heavy?

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from IND_NRA wrote 2 years 6 weeks ago

A bullet that heavy for an AR you will have issues with it sitting in the mag, the bullet will be longer. I have loaded these heavy bullets in my AR loads and you have to play around with them until you get a good fit. But I agree with hunt_fish_sleep you are better off getting a .243 of 6mm if you can afford. Plus to add I don't know of any manufactures that load these heavy rounds in 223, and I would also shoot them in a bolt gun, but that is just me. Hope that helps.

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from deerhunterrick wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

As long as you have the correct twist rate you'll be fine. 1:7 & 1:9 is what they were originally for the 5.56. The commerical verisions(.223) are mostly 1:14 maybe a few 1:12 twist.But remember, the .223 and 5.56x45 are not the same cartridge. I have shot out to 600 yards with 77/80gr mat hp bullets out of a 1:7 ,But it will stabilize 90 grs in a 1:7 or 1:8 twist. 75 grs is about the max for a 1:9 , and 1:12- 1:14 twist are for varmint bullets 40 -55 grs. The heavier bullets like the 75gr A-max are tight in the mag a they are long to the limit long in an AR platform. Why would you need a 90gr bullet unless you are trying to shoot deer or something though. A better choice would be to step up to a .243 or 6.5 IMO

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from BigBboy25 wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

You can use them yes, they will work fine. The Army Marksmanship unit used the 90 grain Berger VLD for 1,000 yards with AR's and open sights but they were loaded extremely hot. Honestly if you are shooting 600 yards with an AR for High Power Competition I'd go with an 80 grain Sierra Matchking, 75 grain A-Max or 80 grain A-max. Those are the go to choices of most High Masters. The others are correct about the twist, you'll need a 1:7" twist for the 90 grains, but you'll be able to shoot an 80 grain bullet with a 1:9" twist. Load them with Varget or RL-15 and seat them 0.010"-0.020" off of the rifling and you should do well. You will have to single load them though, you won't be able to load them to magazine length.

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from jr9893 wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

to hunt_fish_sleep, I saw that you could buy those heavy bullets to reload and was curious.

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from hunt_fish_sleep wrote 2 years 6 weeks ago

What is the rate of twist on your barrel? 1 in 9" will not stabilize a bullet that heavy. 1 in 7" will do a better job. Heck, you may even keyhole with a 90 grain bullet in 1 in 7". Most basic AR-15s come with 1 in 9. Most custom jobs have 1 in 7". If you have 1 in 9" I would say save your time and money and just buy a .243 since that's basically what you're trying to replicate. Where did you find .22 Caliber bullets that heavy?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from IND_NRA wrote 2 years 6 weeks ago

A bullet that heavy for an AR you will have issues with it sitting in the mag, the bullet will be longer. I have loaded these heavy bullets in my AR loads and you have to play around with them until you get a good fit. But I agree with hunt_fish_sleep you are better off getting a .243 of 6mm if you can afford. Plus to add I don't know of any manufactures that load these heavy rounds in 223, and I would also shoot them in a bolt gun, but that is just me. Hope that helps.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

As long as you have the correct twist rate you'll be fine. 1:7 & 1:9 is what they were originally for the 5.56. The commerical verisions(.223) are mostly 1:14 maybe a few 1:12 twist.But remember, the .223 and 5.56x45 are not the same cartridge. I have shot out to 600 yards with 77/80gr mat hp bullets out of a 1:7 ,But it will stabilize 90 grs in a 1:7 or 1:8 twist. 75 grs is about the max for a 1:9 , and 1:12- 1:14 twist are for varmint bullets 40 -55 grs. The heavier bullets like the 75gr A-max are tight in the mag a they are long to the limit long in an AR platform. Why would you need a 90gr bullet unless you are trying to shoot deer or something though. A better choice would be to step up to a .243 or 6.5 IMO

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from BigBboy25 wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

You can use them yes, they will work fine. The Army Marksmanship unit used the 90 grain Berger VLD for 1,000 yards with AR's and open sights but they were loaded extremely hot. Honestly if you are shooting 600 yards with an AR for High Power Competition I'd go with an 80 grain Sierra Matchking, 75 grain A-Max or 80 grain A-max. Those are the go to choices of most High Masters. The others are correct about the twist, you'll need a 1:7" twist for the 90 grains, but you'll be able to shoot an 80 grain bullet with a 1:9" twist. Load them with Varget or RL-15 and seat them 0.010"-0.020" off of the rifling and you should do well. You will have to single load them though, you won't be able to load them to magazine length.

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from jr9893 wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

to hunt_fish_sleep, I saw that you could buy those heavy bullets to reload and was curious.

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