Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

AnswersASK YOUR QUESTION

Answers

Q:
NICKEL PLATED CARTRIDGE CASES? What is your opinion regarding nickel plated rifle cases versus regular brass cases? I have used both but would like to hear your opinions. Nickel plated cases sure are easy to clean and don't require polishing, What say you?

Question by WA Mtnhunter. Uploaded on April 30, 2011

Answers (18)

Top Rated
All Answers
from Del in KS wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

The one time I tried them (7mm Rem mag) they made the most inaccurate ammo I tried in that particular rifle. Didn't matter what bullet or powder.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Haven't seen them in rifle casings yet but the pistol ones sure sucked in comparison to brass. Splitting was a problem. But I think those were solid nickle not plated. The plated steel shotgun shells don't last any time in the field and I'd be concerned about reloading them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

I heard they were rough on your dies so I've stayed away from em.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

I guess I am old school. I like the nickle for sinker molds but prefer the brass for my relaods. Find it easier to see when there is a neck problem opposed to not being able to see the nickle before it splits. All that shine just hides the crack better. Nickle cases are thicker too making load pressures go high at times. And resizing cases down they tend to kink sometimes. I stick with brass

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

I have used them in 25/06 and .308 Winchester. The cases deliverd poor accuracy in 25/06. The .308 nickle brass shot as well as regular. They do clean easy and they stand out once on the ground.

Personally I don't see the need for them unless you are shooting Black powder loads in handguns or the traditional BP cartridges.

Spritz some Flitz into your tumbler with plain corn cob or walnut media and you will clean up the most gunky brass you come across.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

The reason I ask is that I tried some in my .257 Roberts a while back with TSX bullets with less than spectacular results. The .35 Whelen loads I recently worked up with once-fired Federal nickel plated cases are some of the most accurate loads that I have ever produced with Accurate 2460 and Remington 9 1/2M primers. The RCBS FL dies that I am using have very little work on the case, almost like neck sizing. All resized cases chamber slick as silk.

Still would like to see other answers! Thanks!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

I use regular brass cases to work up all of my loads and use regular brass to get my rifles sighted in. Then I load up nickel cases for my hunting loads. I shoot a couple to make sure they are on and I have found that my regular brass cases and my nickel cases shoot the same place. I like them because they don't get as dirty and are much easier to keep clean. As WAMthunter said they seem to run easier through my dies than regular brass cases and they do chamber easier. I don't think that you get as many reloads out of them as you do regular brass cases.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

I use a few of the nickel plated cases for my hunting loads. I use plain brass cases for most of my target and varmint shooting and go through hundreds of those. Since I usually only shoot one or two cartridges at deer or antelope each season, I like to separate those nickel plated rounds so I can keep those fine (expensive and heavier) hunting bullets for the future. I haven't noticed any difference in velocity or performance of the nickel cases. They are also very easy to find in the field for reloading. I can usually find them in three foot high prairie grass if necessary.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cbass wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

WAM, I'm on my fourth loading of a batch of 100 nickel cases in .30-06. They re-work well, and shoot consistently the same velocities and groups as my brass cases. Additionally, as you mention, polishing isn't necessary. I'll continue to buy them over common brass.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

They seem to split quicker than the brass. I'm staying with brass it seems more 'flexible' for reloading.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Have used a few boxes of Winchester premium in .308 with nickel cases. I prefer brass, but for no real reason.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Thanks for your answers. I don't resize for different calibers with any of my loads. I do notice that the nickel plated .35 Whelen cases are about 3 grains heavier than Remington regular brass cases.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

i shoot winchester ammo out of my .270 thats a nickel, havent seen any difference in accuracy between nickel and brass, but my experience is limited with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Too brittle and cannot be annealed, but they look good.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Nickel can get pretty hard - I'd avoid resizing if they start flaking.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

MLH

Good idea. I would not load any cases that plating was flaking off or other visual indications of fatigue.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jeff Bowers wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

The only notes I have about nickel casings is;

They don't tarnish like brass, and store better. I use nickel cases for my .38, and self defense ammo that lays around a long time.

If you shoot SASS, or use a western style belt with cartridge loops on it, nickel is better, since the leather, and any dressing on it, will permanently tarnish/rust brass cases.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gootch wrote 2 years 46 weeks ago

I use Federal Nickel 308 cases in my Remington 700. topped with 155 Palma Match on 47 grains of Varget and BR-2 primer, it is the most accurate load I could come up with (0.375 inch/100 yrds/5 rnd group)

Neck splits are common, hard on dies. But they stay clean, don't corrode, are easier to chamber and specs are dead on. With proper preparation these cases will give great performance and should give you three or four reloads before having to toss them.

I bought 1000 of them and they will last me for the life of the barrel (or the next zombie apocolypse)

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from Del in KS wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

The one time I tried them (7mm Rem mag) they made the most inaccurate ammo I tried in that particular rifle. Didn't matter what bullet or powder.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Haven't seen them in rifle casings yet but the pistol ones sure sucked in comparison to brass. Splitting was a problem. But I think those were solid nickle not plated. The plated steel shotgun shells don't last any time in the field and I'd be concerned about reloading them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

I heard they were rough on your dies so I've stayed away from em.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

I guess I am old school. I like the nickle for sinker molds but prefer the brass for my relaods. Find it easier to see when there is a neck problem opposed to not being able to see the nickle before it splits. All that shine just hides the crack better. Nickle cases are thicker too making load pressures go high at times. And resizing cases down they tend to kink sometimes. I stick with brass

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

I have used them in 25/06 and .308 Winchester. The cases deliverd poor accuracy in 25/06. The .308 nickle brass shot as well as regular. They do clean easy and they stand out once on the ground.

Personally I don't see the need for them unless you are shooting Black powder loads in handguns or the traditional BP cartridges.

Spritz some Flitz into your tumbler with plain corn cob or walnut media and you will clean up the most gunky brass you come across.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

I use regular brass cases to work up all of my loads and use regular brass to get my rifles sighted in. Then I load up nickel cases for my hunting loads. I shoot a couple to make sure they are on and I have found that my regular brass cases and my nickel cases shoot the same place. I like them because they don't get as dirty and are much easier to keep clean. As WAMthunter said they seem to run easier through my dies than regular brass cases and they do chamber easier. I don't think that you get as many reloads out of them as you do regular brass cases.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

The reason I ask is that I tried some in my .257 Roberts a while back with TSX bullets with less than spectacular results. The .35 Whelen loads I recently worked up with once-fired Federal nickel plated cases are some of the most accurate loads that I have ever produced with Accurate 2460 and Remington 9 1/2M primers. The RCBS FL dies that I am using have very little work on the case, almost like neck sizing. All resized cases chamber slick as silk.

Still would like to see other answers! Thanks!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

I use a few of the nickel plated cases for my hunting loads. I use plain brass cases for most of my target and varmint shooting and go through hundreds of those. Since I usually only shoot one or two cartridges at deer or antelope each season, I like to separate those nickel plated rounds so I can keep those fine (expensive and heavier) hunting bullets for the future. I haven't noticed any difference in velocity or performance of the nickel cases. They are also very easy to find in the field for reloading. I can usually find them in three foot high prairie grass if necessary.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cbass wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

WAM, I'm on my fourth loading of a batch of 100 nickel cases in .30-06. They re-work well, and shoot consistently the same velocities and groups as my brass cases. Additionally, as you mention, polishing isn't necessary. I'll continue to buy them over common brass.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

They seem to split quicker than the brass. I'm staying with brass it seems more 'flexible' for reloading.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Have used a few boxes of Winchester premium in .308 with nickel cases. I prefer brass, but for no real reason.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Thanks for your answers. I don't resize for different calibers with any of my loads. I do notice that the nickel plated .35 Whelen cases are about 3 grains heavier than Remington regular brass cases.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

i shoot winchester ammo out of my .270 thats a nickel, havent seen any difference in accuracy between nickel and brass, but my experience is limited with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Too brittle and cannot be annealed, but they look good.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Nickel can get pretty hard - I'd avoid resizing if they start flaking.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

MLH

Good idea. I would not load any cases that plating was flaking off or other visual indications of fatigue.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jeff Bowers wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

The only notes I have about nickel casings is;

They don't tarnish like brass, and store better. I use nickel cases for my .38, and self defense ammo that lays around a long time.

If you shoot SASS, or use a western style belt with cartridge loops on it, nickel is better, since the leather, and any dressing on it, will permanently tarnish/rust brass cases.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gootch wrote 2 years 46 weeks ago

I use Federal Nickel 308 cases in my Remington 700. topped with 155 Palma Match on 47 grains of Varget and BR-2 primer, it is the most accurate load I could come up with (0.375 inch/100 yrds/5 rnd group)

Neck splits are common, hard on dies. But they stay clean, don't corrode, are easier to chamber and specs are dead on. With proper preparation these cases will give great performance and should give you three or four reloads before having to toss them.

I bought 1000 of them and they will last me for the life of the barrel (or the next zombie apocolypse)

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

bmxbiz-fs