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Q:
I really want to get the Thompson Center Venture Predator in .22-250. I used to want it in .223 but I compared the cases and I saw the differences. Is the .223 better? Also, what other guns are good (I've had my heart set on this one for over a year though)? Anyone have any luck by being near a ranch when they're calving? Thanks

Question by predator hunter. Uploaded on January 06, 2011

Answers (9)

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from fng wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

The .223 isn't "better"; its slightly slower, cheaper, and easier on barrels. A well cared for .223 can get a lot of rounds through it before it starts to lose accuracy, there's cheap military fmj ammo bloody everywhere, and its very effective on varmints from what I've seen. However, a .22-250 is a buttwhooper for the bigger varmints; if you think that shooting at longer distances, or that shooting groundhogs or coyotes, or both, are on the menu, the.22-250 will do a little farther out with a little more punch. However, you'll pay more unless you handload, and it burns barrels pretty quick. If you're talking about 5-10 coyotes a year plus a bit of range time, its probably not a big deal; if you want to set up and shoot at pdawgs for long strings of time, keep in mind you're going to eventually lose the useful life of the barrel.

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from jamesti wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

i worked a cattle ranch as a kid, when the price of hides was a bit better. i used to volunteer to check health all night during calving season and people thought i was crazy until i had 6 or more yotes on the ground by morning. those hides let me persue a lot of other hobbies that i had. i also had permission to hunt other ranches in the area. .22 mag worked great for me back then.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

If you had a choice of hunting with 22 Shorts or 22LR, which one would you choose, obviously the faster cartridge, right!

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from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

I don't think any cartridge is necessarily better. They just have different uses and sweet spots. For varmint eradication, I like the .223 in the AR platform for hunting running varmints and multiple varmints in a pack because of the great follow up shot capability. If you are shooting a lot of targets or prairie dogs, you will like the .223 because of low cost and barrel life. In a T/C platform for general hunting of everything up to deer size, I would definitely suggest the .22-250 for speed. It is worth the extra powder and barrel life for real flat shooting and minimal lead. In that use, I personally prefer a 26 inch barrelled 25-06 with a 1:12 twist shooting 75g bullets. They buck the wind better and if you are shooting deer and coyotes, you can shoot mighty fine bigger bullets. Although not optimal, you could even deck and elk with that for an all around highly useful one rifle for all uses.

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from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

The .22-250 will in most conditions out shoot a .223 . It will shoot a varity of bullets ranging from 45gr cast to 70gr btfmj. It is accurite and fast. Remember though if you do choose the .223 it is not the same cartiage as the military 5.56 even if you have been told this. the 5.56 casings are different and they have been loaded to a higher C.U.P (pressure) the the standard .223 in sporting firearms. So unless you are going to purchase an AR or simular military grade firearm the military ammo is really is not recommended for use in a sporting grade firearm. That aside the casing are reloadable

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from fng wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

Im doing a gunsmithing course and asking myself the same question; either I'll rebarrel my Weatherby vanguuard for .25-06, or I'll buy a short 700, and either a .223, .22-250 or a .243. I have big (read big game) rifles and have never owned a varmint centerfire, nor have I set up at a big prarie dog town. Im limited to a .22lr or light (80 grain) bullets out of my Swede, so I want an all rounder. As its Alberta and coyotes are all over, Im strongly thinking .22-250; I just can't afford to rebarrel a rifle I shoot alot ever other year.

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from ishawooa wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

I have two old .22-.250's that have fired thousands of rounds, many from hot barrels, at prairie dawgs. I like the range the cartridge offers and since I reload the cost of ammo is no big deal. The .223 is exactly what fng said above. You can shoot cheaper and the ammo is lighter so if you are walking it is easy to carry around a big bucket full of cartridges. Back when the .223 first came out we all wondered why it existed since we already had the .222 mag. It looked like a decent but not great varmint round. Of course as it was our military round its fate was instantly determined much like the '06 and .308.

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from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

fng... sorry my friend, to each his own but you would never catch me replacing a good 25-06 barrel with a .22-250. I've shot thousands of p-dogs with both and outshoot the .22-250 every day with my trusty 25-06. Use 75g .257 bullets. I shoot a lot with the .223 also. Both the .223 and the .22-250 will shoot the exact same bullets given the same barrel twist. Most common in .224 caliber rifles is the 1:9 twist that will shoot 40g to 75g just fine. The 75g .224 cal bullets are very accurate out to 600 yards but just don't go as fast as the 25-06 75g bullets so the holdover and wind begin to be more of a problem. I much prefer the 25-06 at ranges of 300-600 yards on p-dogs. I have really smoked a lot of long range p-dogs with a 25-06 27 inch barrel with a 1:12 twist... hard to beat. I shoot .223 75g bullets at about 3000 fps and 25-06s at whatever speed required to keep the jackets on them... usually 3750 to 3850 fps. The .22-250 and .220 Swift are in between. The 40g .224 bullets break 4100 fps but they are like throwing pepper into the wind and they burn the barrel faster than they do the p-dogs.

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from fng wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

No, I meant that I would replace the barrel on my first rifle (A weatherby vanguard in .300 win that wouldn't shoot for sh*t) with a .25-06 barrel and see how that went, or if the gunsmith said he'd rather I bought a new action I'd make a short action varminter. I don't really have a gun that can be counted as a "varmint rifle" besides my .22, and I need to make one, so why not? the .25-06 interests me alot, especially after all of the advice coming back has been positive.

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from fng wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

The .223 isn't "better"; its slightly slower, cheaper, and easier on barrels. A well cared for .223 can get a lot of rounds through it before it starts to lose accuracy, there's cheap military fmj ammo bloody everywhere, and its very effective on varmints from what I've seen. However, a .22-250 is a buttwhooper for the bigger varmints; if you think that shooting at longer distances, or that shooting groundhogs or coyotes, or both, are on the menu, the.22-250 will do a little farther out with a little more punch. However, you'll pay more unless you handload, and it burns barrels pretty quick. If you're talking about 5-10 coyotes a year plus a bit of range time, its probably not a big deal; if you want to set up and shoot at pdawgs for long strings of time, keep in mind you're going to eventually lose the useful life of the barrel.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

i worked a cattle ranch as a kid, when the price of hides was a bit better. i used to volunteer to check health all night during calving season and people thought i was crazy until i had 6 or more yotes on the ground by morning. those hides let me persue a lot of other hobbies that i had. i also had permission to hunt other ranches in the area. .22 mag worked great for me back then.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

If you had a choice of hunting with 22 Shorts or 22LR, which one would you choose, obviously the faster cartridge, right!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

I don't think any cartridge is necessarily better. They just have different uses and sweet spots. For varmint eradication, I like the .223 in the AR platform for hunting running varmints and multiple varmints in a pack because of the great follow up shot capability. If you are shooting a lot of targets or prairie dogs, you will like the .223 because of low cost and barrel life. In a T/C platform for general hunting of everything up to deer size, I would definitely suggest the .22-250 for speed. It is worth the extra powder and barrel life for real flat shooting and minimal lead. In that use, I personally prefer a 26 inch barrelled 25-06 with a 1:12 twist shooting 75g bullets. They buck the wind better and if you are shooting deer and coyotes, you can shoot mighty fine bigger bullets. Although not optimal, you could even deck and elk with that for an all around highly useful one rifle for all uses.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

The .22-250 will in most conditions out shoot a .223 . It will shoot a varity of bullets ranging from 45gr cast to 70gr btfmj. It is accurite and fast. Remember though if you do choose the .223 it is not the same cartiage as the military 5.56 even if you have been told this. the 5.56 casings are different and they have been loaded to a higher C.U.P (pressure) the the standard .223 in sporting firearms. So unless you are going to purchase an AR or simular military grade firearm the military ammo is really is not recommended for use in a sporting grade firearm. That aside the casing are reloadable

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fng wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

Im doing a gunsmithing course and asking myself the same question; either I'll rebarrel my Weatherby vanguuard for .25-06, or I'll buy a short 700, and either a .223, .22-250 or a .243. I have big (read big game) rifles and have never owned a varmint centerfire, nor have I set up at a big prarie dog town. Im limited to a .22lr or light (80 grain) bullets out of my Swede, so I want an all rounder. As its Alberta and coyotes are all over, Im strongly thinking .22-250; I just can't afford to rebarrel a rifle I shoot alot ever other year.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

I have two old .22-.250's that have fired thousands of rounds, many from hot barrels, at prairie dawgs. I like the range the cartridge offers and since I reload the cost of ammo is no big deal. The .223 is exactly what fng said above. You can shoot cheaper and the ammo is lighter so if you are walking it is easy to carry around a big bucket full of cartridges. Back when the .223 first came out we all wondered why it existed since we already had the .222 mag. It looked like a decent but not great varmint round. Of course as it was our military round its fate was instantly determined much like the '06 and .308.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

fng... sorry my friend, to each his own but you would never catch me replacing a good 25-06 barrel with a .22-250. I've shot thousands of p-dogs with both and outshoot the .22-250 every day with my trusty 25-06. Use 75g .257 bullets. I shoot a lot with the .223 also. Both the .223 and the .22-250 will shoot the exact same bullets given the same barrel twist. Most common in .224 caliber rifles is the 1:9 twist that will shoot 40g to 75g just fine. The 75g .224 cal bullets are very accurate out to 600 yards but just don't go as fast as the 25-06 75g bullets so the holdover and wind begin to be more of a problem. I much prefer the 25-06 at ranges of 300-600 yards on p-dogs. I have really smoked a lot of long range p-dogs with a 25-06 27 inch barrel with a 1:12 twist... hard to beat. I shoot .223 75g bullets at about 3000 fps and 25-06s at whatever speed required to keep the jackets on them... usually 3750 to 3850 fps. The .22-250 and .220 Swift are in between. The 40g .224 bullets break 4100 fps but they are like throwing pepper into the wind and they burn the barrel faster than they do the p-dogs.

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from fng wrote 3 years 14 weeks ago

No, I meant that I would replace the barrel on my first rifle (A weatherby vanguard in .300 win that wouldn't shoot for sh*t) with a .25-06 barrel and see how that went, or if the gunsmith said he'd rather I bought a new action I'd make a short action varminter. I don't really have a gun that can be counted as a "varmint rifle" besides my .22, and I need to make one, so why not? the .25-06 interests me alot, especially after all of the advice coming back has been positive.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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