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Q:
I have a 270 WSM. I zeroed it at an indoor range at a distance if 25 yards. I was told that if I zeroed it 1.5 inches low it would be dead on at 100 yards due to the rounds trajectory. Is this true, and if so what is a recommendation for sighting in at this distance.

Question by Killswitch. Uploaded on October 27, 2009

Answers (7)

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from jamesti wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

if i'm not mistaken you should have the rifle zeroed to hit one and a half inches high at 100 yards. you can go to winchester's web sight and use thier ballistic chart to get the best info on the particular round you plan to use.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

You are looking for some missing if you don't shoot your rifle at 100 and 200 hundred yards to confirm zero. That cartridge's bullet should cross the scope line of sight (zero) at about 22-25 yards and remain above the line of sight and cross it again at about 200 yards. Why would you zero a .270 WSM at 100 yards?

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from Killswitch wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I'm not shooing very far where I'm hunting,so thanks for the info.

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from MLH wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I ran 130gr and 150 gr bullets traveling 3,250 and 3,125 fps through two trajectory calculators (with scope centerline 1.5" above bore centerline). Should be at -0.8" at 25 yards to zero at 100 yards. Still should verify it after sighting in.

As Jamesti said, try the Winchester ballistics calculator for the specific round you are using. Set the interval distance to 25 yards, the sight in distance to 100 yards, enter the correct scope height and calculate. Print the chart to see 25 yard zero.

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from BioGuy wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Shoot a few rounds at 100 yards also. Zeroing at 25 yards pretty much helps you hit the paper at 100 yards. There is will likely still need to be some fine tuning of windage and elevation to be completely zeroed.

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from IanS wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Get on paper at 25 yards but with that rifle I'd be an inch high at 100 yards

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from sgaredneck wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

You need to shoot at actual distance for your desired zero. I would personally set up for 200 yds. Dead on at 200 with a commercial 130 grain load you will be able to hold dead on out to there, and even at 300 only be about 5-6 inches low. With variances in firearm, ammunition, and shooter, you need to prove actual results.

You can interpolate a 25yd shot at so many inches high to estimate what a gun will do, at say 100yds, but until you punch consistent holes at your desired zero range, you are rolling the dice. I personally want to come as close as humanly possible to guaranteeing where my sent rounds are going to hit. I want to be able to put that shot on that animal and make a clean, quick kill.

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from MLH wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I ran 130gr and 150 gr bullets traveling 3,250 and 3,125 fps through two trajectory calculators (with scope centerline 1.5" above bore centerline). Should be at -0.8" at 25 yards to zero at 100 yards. Still should verify it after sighting in.

As Jamesti said, try the Winchester ballistics calculator for the specific round you are using. Set the interval distance to 25 yards, the sight in distance to 100 yards, enter the correct scope height and calculate. Print the chart to see 25 yard zero.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from sgaredneck wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

You need to shoot at actual distance for your desired zero. I would personally set up for 200 yds. Dead on at 200 with a commercial 130 grain load you will be able to hold dead on out to there, and even at 300 only be about 5-6 inches low. With variances in firearm, ammunition, and shooter, you need to prove actual results.

You can interpolate a 25yd shot at so many inches high to estimate what a gun will do, at say 100yds, but until you punch consistent holes at your desired zero range, you are rolling the dice. I personally want to come as close as humanly possible to guaranteeing where my sent rounds are going to hit. I want to be able to put that shot on that animal and make a clean, quick kill.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

if i'm not mistaken you should have the rifle zeroed to hit one and a half inches high at 100 yards. you can go to winchester's web sight and use thier ballistic chart to get the best info on the particular round you plan to use.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

You are looking for some missing if you don't shoot your rifle at 100 and 200 hundred yards to confirm zero. That cartridge's bullet should cross the scope line of sight (zero) at about 22-25 yards and remain above the line of sight and cross it again at about 200 yards. Why would you zero a .270 WSM at 100 yards?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Shoot a few rounds at 100 yards also. Zeroing at 25 yards pretty much helps you hit the paper at 100 yards. There is will likely still need to be some fine tuning of windage and elevation to be completely zeroed.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from IanS wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Get on paper at 25 yards but with that rifle I'd be an inch high at 100 yards

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from Killswitch wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I'm not shooing very far where I'm hunting,so thanks for the info.

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