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Q:
I read recently that toady's guns should be sighted in 3" high at 100 yards to use the guns range effectively. Does this sound high by todays standards? I am shooting a 270 WSM that has ballistics showing a 1" high 100 yard will give me a 200 yard zero. What say ye.

Question by 270WSM. Uploaded on August 17, 2009

Answers (12)

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from Hunt_Hard wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I say I would make it an inch or two high at one hundred yards.

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I'm about 1.5" high at 100 yds with my '06 and about 7" low at 300. I never mess with it because i'm familiar with the ballistics the way they are. i suppose if i made it 2.5 at 100 i'd be flatter at 300 but i rarely if ever shoot that far at game. Only once and that was a one shot kill.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

270WSM

You should consider whether or not you are comfortable using the Maximum Point Blank Range method of sighting in or a known zero range and compensating from there. With the MPBR, you should zero your rifle so that the bullet path is no more than 3 inches above line of sight along it's flight and note the maximum range at which the trajectory falls 3 inches below line of sight. I zero my 7mm Weatherby for a 250 yard zero, which equates to 2" high at 100 yards, a maximum of 2.4 inches at 150 yards and 3" low at 300 yards. So this basically gives me a dead-on hold out to 300 yards for MOP. For ranges out past 300 yards, I have the drop table taped to the stock and burned into my brain, just in case one of them malfunctions. I believe similar numbers would apply to a .270 WSM with most loads, although you should run them through a ballistics table and calculator. My .35 Whelen sight-in has a 200 yard zero with MPBR of 240 yards, so it varies from caliber/load to another.

Good luck this year.

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from 270WSM wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Thanks guys. that will help.
WA Mtnhunter I appreciate the quality info.
Good luck to you also this fall.

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from meagel wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

3" high may equal a miss at a shorter distance, especially in brush. 1-2" enough, just use holdovers

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I agree with 'meagel' on the 3" @100 sight-in. Unless you know that all your shots are going to be very long, that is a bit much. With most .270 - 7mm mags, 3" @100 yields about a 300 yard zero and almost 4" high around 175 yards.

The MPBR sight in described above is -0.3 to +1.5 from 25 to 75 yards, adequate brush ranges. If 1.5 inches causes a miss on a "MOP" target, there are other issues to consider...

That .270 WSM is a good rifle and as I have posted before, I have witnessed the fine results in the field on large deer and big bull elk! The .270 caliber has just never been one of my favorites, however. But that's just me. I had .257 and .308 bores and did not see any real need for a fill-in caliber since I now have a 7mm Weatherby. Not much difference in ballistics and real killing power with similar weight bullets with the 7mm magnums. It is certainly all that a good marksman needs in the Lower 48.

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from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Its a matter of personal preference and knowing the drop for the ranges you will be shooting. For most of my deer hunting (with a 25-06), I use the dead on zero at 100 yards. Most whitetails are shot inside of 200 yards and I know the drop and wind adjustments out to 600 yards and they work just fine. I zero my long range deer rifle (.300 Dakota) at 250 yards using the MPBR method and again memorize the drop/windage out to 1000 yards (I am still practicing to take my first shot at that range though).

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

For most fast modern calibers, this is a good rule of thumb for exploring your rifle's ballistics, but mostly a very practical thing to do for big game hunting. It is pretty much a MPBR trick.

Zero at 25 yards, hold dead on to 250 yards. Further out than that? Hunt more.

WAM - what meagel is referring to with brush misses is "threading the needle" - precisely placing shots in small gaps in the brush and then through the animal. 1.5" will most definitely screw this up for you.

In most cases, this applies especially to brush shooting, a low scope mount is best. As low as possible. Throw away that goofy 50mm scope, or save it for the target guns. A hunting rifle needs a scope that is mounted low low low for a million reasons. Most people don't realize that when you zero, that bullet has to go up at an angle from where it came out of the barrel up to where the crosshairs are in the scope. This can really screw you up. Flatten that angle as much as possible with a nice little scope you can mount low.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

How far do you expect most of your shots to be? I have my 270 WSM is zero'd at 200. I can still easily hit out to 300 yrds, this is what I consider to be my max range. Maybe if I get one of these new scopes with hold-over aiming points I'll practice out farther even though most of my shots are 100 yrd or less.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 270WSM wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I want a 200 yard zero but I ran across this info on the 3" high at 100 and thought I might be missing something. Thanks for the imput guys.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Good idea. I have 2 of my rifles zero'd at 250 yards just because the typical shot where I elk hunt is 175 to 300 yards. Even at that, it is still "MOP"! All the rest with scopes have a 200 yard zero. Those with iron sights are zero'd at 100 yards. Anything closer is just a dead on hold anyway.

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from rudyglove27 wrote 3 years 36 weeks ago

Agreed with DakotaMan and + 1 for you sir!!!

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

270WSM

You should consider whether or not you are comfortable using the Maximum Point Blank Range method of sighting in or a known zero range and compensating from there. With the MPBR, you should zero your rifle so that the bullet path is no more than 3 inches above line of sight along it's flight and note the maximum range at which the trajectory falls 3 inches below line of sight. I zero my 7mm Weatherby for a 250 yard zero, which equates to 2" high at 100 yards, a maximum of 2.4 inches at 150 yards and 3" low at 300 yards. So this basically gives me a dead-on hold out to 300 yards for MOP. For ranges out past 300 yards, I have the drop table taped to the stock and burned into my brain, just in case one of them malfunctions. I believe similar numbers would apply to a .270 WSM with most loads, although you should run them through a ballistics table and calculator. My .35 Whelen sight-in has a 200 yard zero with MPBR of 240 yards, so it varies from caliber/load to another.

Good luck this year.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from meagel wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

3" high may equal a miss at a shorter distance, especially in brush. 1-2" enough, just use holdovers

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I'm about 1.5" high at 100 yds with my '06 and about 7" low at 300. I never mess with it because i'm familiar with the ballistics the way they are. i suppose if i made it 2.5 at 100 i'd be flatter at 300 but i rarely if ever shoot that far at game. Only once and that was a one shot kill.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from 270WSM wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Thanks guys. that will help.
WA Mtnhunter I appreciate the quality info.
Good luck to you also this fall.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunt_Hard wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I say I would make it an inch or two high at one hundred yards.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I agree with 'meagel' on the 3" @100 sight-in. Unless you know that all your shots are going to be very long, that is a bit much. With most .270 - 7mm mags, 3" @100 yields about a 300 yard zero and almost 4" high around 175 yards.

The MPBR sight in described above is -0.3 to +1.5 from 25 to 75 yards, adequate brush ranges. If 1.5 inches causes a miss on a "MOP" target, there are other issues to consider...

That .270 WSM is a good rifle and as I have posted before, I have witnessed the fine results in the field on large deer and big bull elk! The .270 caliber has just never been one of my favorites, however. But that's just me. I had .257 and .308 bores and did not see any real need for a fill-in caliber since I now have a 7mm Weatherby. Not much difference in ballistics and real killing power with similar weight bullets with the 7mm magnums. It is certainly all that a good marksman needs in the Lower 48.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Its a matter of personal preference and knowing the drop for the ranges you will be shooting. For most of my deer hunting (with a 25-06), I use the dead on zero at 100 yards. Most whitetails are shot inside of 200 yards and I know the drop and wind adjustments out to 600 yards and they work just fine. I zero my long range deer rifle (.300 Dakota) at 250 yards using the MPBR method and again memorize the drop/windage out to 1000 yards (I am still practicing to take my first shot at that range though).

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

For most fast modern calibers, this is a good rule of thumb for exploring your rifle's ballistics, but mostly a very practical thing to do for big game hunting. It is pretty much a MPBR trick.

Zero at 25 yards, hold dead on to 250 yards. Further out than that? Hunt more.

WAM - what meagel is referring to with brush misses is "threading the needle" - precisely placing shots in small gaps in the brush and then through the animal. 1.5" will most definitely screw this up for you.

In most cases, this applies especially to brush shooting, a low scope mount is best. As low as possible. Throw away that goofy 50mm scope, or save it for the target guns. A hunting rifle needs a scope that is mounted low low low for a million reasons. Most people don't realize that when you zero, that bullet has to go up at an angle from where it came out of the barrel up to where the crosshairs are in the scope. This can really screw you up. Flatten that angle as much as possible with a nice little scope you can mount low.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

How far do you expect most of your shots to be? I have my 270 WSM is zero'd at 200. I can still easily hit out to 300 yrds, this is what I consider to be my max range. Maybe if I get one of these new scopes with hold-over aiming points I'll practice out farther even though most of my shots are 100 yrd or less.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 270WSM wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I want a 200 yard zero but I ran across this info on the 3" high at 100 and thought I might be missing something. Thanks for the imput guys.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

Good idea. I have 2 of my rifles zero'd at 250 yards just because the typical shot where I elk hunt is 175 to 300 yards. Even at that, it is still "MOP"! All the rest with scopes have a 200 yard zero. Those with iron sights are zero'd at 100 yards. Anything closer is just a dead on hold anyway.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 3 years 36 weeks ago

Agreed with DakotaMan and + 1 for you sir!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

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