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Q:
I'm off to go hunt Sage rats out in Eastern Oregon, any tips or must have stuff i should get?

Question by huntingismylife99. Uploaded on July 19, 2011

Answers (6)

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from WWIIarmygunsfor... wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

Hmm Well make sure you have an accurate .17 hmr/.22 LR or what ever small varmint gun you have and a good scope. Nope I think your about set and ready to go!

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from huntingismylife99 wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

Shooting sticks are a must i found that out the hard way last time!

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from huntingismylife99 wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

hey i found out those walking sticks we made make good shooting stick
also!

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from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

Not sure what sage rats are but if they are anything like prairie dogs, I would suggest bringing:
1. Binoculars to spot them way out there.
2. A bipod to allow you to lie on a p-dog mound and get a rock solid rest.
3. A sandbag to allow you to put your forend on a p-dog mound and accurately adjust the rear stock of the rifle.
4. A reloader and supplies so you can reload more ammo during periods where they are ducking for a while. This allows you to shoot hundreds of rounds a day with just a few hundred cases.
5. Bring the most accurate rifle you have and load with the smallest bullets you can get for it to reduce recoil. (I use 50g for .224 calibers and 75g for .257 caliber). These give me good shooting out to at least 500 yards.
6. Bring the highest magnification scope you can get. You can't shoot a p-dog if you can't see him.
7. Use a mil-dot scope if you can to verify range and optimize holdover/windage from shot to shot.

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from huntingismylife99 wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

Thank You That was very informative DakotaMan, Out here in Oregon they terrorrize Alfalfa Fields andthey are about the size of a tennis ball so theyre almost impossible to see so a high power scope is a must

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

I live near Portland and drive to Christmas Valley (private land) to shoot sage rats. Last year, I brought a .223, a .22-250, a .22 Hornet and a .22 WMR with me. The .223 and .22-250 weren't withdrawn from their cases; the .22 Hornet and .22 Mag (a Ruger M77/22M) did all the work and did it well. This year, I returned to the same property, a bit late in the season, and relied on the bolt action .22 Mag and a Ruger 10/22 autoloader.
The distances at which shots presented themselves made the centerfire rifles a question of "overkill". The rimfires were up to the task.
Since we were operating in sagebrush in the standing offhand or kneeling positions, crossed shooting sticks served us well for some of the shots.
I'd be interested in learning what you encounter on your trip. Good luck.
Ed

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from huntingismylife99 wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

Shooting sticks are a must i found that out the hard way last time!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntingismylife99 wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

hey i found out those walking sticks we made make good shooting stick
also!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WWIIarmygunsfor... wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

Hmm Well make sure you have an accurate .17 hmr/.22 LR or what ever small varmint gun you have and a good scope. Nope I think your about set and ready to go!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

Not sure what sage rats are but if they are anything like prairie dogs, I would suggest bringing:
1. Binoculars to spot them way out there.
2. A bipod to allow you to lie on a p-dog mound and get a rock solid rest.
3. A sandbag to allow you to put your forend on a p-dog mound and accurately adjust the rear stock of the rifle.
4. A reloader and supplies so you can reload more ammo during periods where they are ducking for a while. This allows you to shoot hundreds of rounds a day with just a few hundred cases.
5. Bring the most accurate rifle you have and load with the smallest bullets you can get for it to reduce recoil. (I use 50g for .224 calibers and 75g for .257 caliber). These give me good shooting out to at least 500 yards.
6. Bring the highest magnification scope you can get. You can't shoot a p-dog if you can't see him.
7. Use a mil-dot scope if you can to verify range and optimize holdover/windage from shot to shot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntingismylife99 wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

Thank You That was very informative DakotaMan, Out here in Oregon they terrorrize Alfalfa Fields andthey are about the size of a tennis ball so theyre almost impossible to see so a high power scope is a must

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 2 years 39 weeks ago

I live near Portland and drive to Christmas Valley (private land) to shoot sage rats. Last year, I brought a .223, a .22-250, a .22 Hornet and a .22 WMR with me. The .223 and .22-250 weren't withdrawn from their cases; the .22 Hornet and .22 Mag (a Ruger M77/22M) did all the work and did it well. This year, I returned to the same property, a bit late in the season, and relied on the bolt action .22 Mag and a Ruger 10/22 autoloader.
The distances at which shots presented themselves made the centerfire rifles a question of "overkill". The rimfires were up to the task.
Since we were operating in sagebrush in the standing offhand or kneeling positions, crossed shooting sticks served us well for some of the shots.
I'd be interested in learning what you encounter on your trip. Good luck.
Ed

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