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Q:
I have a Remington model 11/Browning A-5 (Humpback) and i was wondering what is worth?

Question by theobsession. Uploaded on November 26, 2009

Answers (11)

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

vBest Answer - Chosen by Voters
MODEL 11-48 SEMI-AUTO
- 12, 16, 20, 28 (introduced 1952) ga., or .410 (introduced 1954) bore, recoil operated action, walnut stock. Approx. 429,000 mfg., 1949-68.
Grading ........100% ...98% ...95% ...90% ...80% ...70% ..60%
Plain barrel ..$300 ..$225 ...$200 ...$185 ..$175 ..$165 .$140
VR barrel .....$325 ..$275 ...$250 ...$200 ..$175 ..$165 .$140

Add 25%-60% for 28 ga. or .410 bore, depending on condition.
Source(s):
28th Edition Blue Book of Gun Values

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Moishe, he is talking about the old Model 11 which is a copy of Browning A-5. The 11-48 succeeded the Model 11. Obsession, more details on what you have, please. Probably has a solid rib (amazingly, those were machined in one piece with the barrel, not soldered on). Many have had barrel problems. Look closely at yours, especially for pitting in the bore and bulging at muzzel. Almost certainly a 12 gauge.

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from theobsession wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

i'll try to post a picture i don't much about it other than its a 12 guage and shoots real nice

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Sorry, will try again. I was not paying close enough attention

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from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

theo,
Rem autoloading shotgun (pre-model 11), 80% $395.

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from theobsession wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

thanks for the price suggestions

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from Bigeasttx wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Remington started production of the Model 11 around 1905 and made millions off the Browning patten as well as Savage and Winchester. As far as value you goes not a great deal, but on the flip side you have a great shotgun. I have one that was made in 1908 and 1912 and still hunt with both. One in great condition might fetch you 300 bucks the gun is worth more in your gun cabinet.

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from hunterdave5 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

depends how good of shape its in

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from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

As you know by now, they're not the same thing. Stop shooting it immediately. The bolts eventually break. They are not reliable anyway, since they have only one extractor, as opposed to two for the A-5.. Time to pass it on to a collector and move ahead.

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from nevadany wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

blackdawgz, what are you talking about? "bolts eventually break" & "They are not reliable anyway"?

This is my experience: The only time i had any issue with a Remington not being reliable was when the ejector broke on the gun i mention below...A $5 part and a small fee to the smith had it up and running just fine...that happened 3 years ago...which means my particular shotgun went 102 years before failure...even the number on the barrel matches the reciver.

the Remington M11 and Browning A5 are not the same, but the Remington is a good solid, reliable gun, and as long as it's in good mechanical shape, it is safe to fire. My Remington is a Remington Automatic Shotgun (pre M11), that dates back to the first couple months of production in 1905. I shoot it with no fear.

I've had other M11's in the past and have 1 Browning A5 currently. I would say that are equals in performance, but the Browning has a nicer more refined finish than the Remington, and you pay for that...big time.

Also of note: anything mechanical will break, it's just a matter of time

As to the matter of what its worth...condition is teh most important factor. the Remington's aren't that desireable compared to the Browning, so if you have a plain barrel 12 gauge in good shape, it's probably only worth $200+/-.

I know where there is a 16 gauge, solid rib M11 (1932 production, i think) in pretty good shape for $350...i think that price is a little high and it should be about $250-$300...and that is for a relativley scarce Remington M11

DW

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from Chrisf7469 wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

remington M11 is a great gun! you must keep an eye on the fiber cushion in the rear of the receiver tho if they break or fall out the bolt could crack from hitting the back of the receiver.

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

vBest Answer - Chosen by Voters
MODEL 11-48 SEMI-AUTO
- 12, 16, 20, 28 (introduced 1952) ga., or .410 (introduced 1954) bore, recoil operated action, walnut stock. Approx. 429,000 mfg., 1949-68.
Grading ........100% ...98% ...95% ...90% ...80% ...70% ..60%
Plain barrel ..$300 ..$225 ...$200 ...$185 ..$175 ..$165 .$140
VR barrel .....$325 ..$275 ...$250 ...$200 ..$175 ..$165 .$140

Add 25%-60% for 28 ga. or .410 bore, depending on condition.
Source(s):
28th Edition Blue Book of Gun Values

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Moishe, he is talking about the old Model 11 which is a copy of Browning A-5. The 11-48 succeeded the Model 11. Obsession, more details on what you have, please. Probably has a solid rib (amazingly, those were machined in one piece with the barrel, not soldered on). Many have had barrel problems. Look closely at yours, especially for pitting in the bore and bulging at muzzel. Almost certainly a 12 gauge.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from theobsession wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

i'll try to post a picture i don't much about it other than its a 12 guage and shoots real nice

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Sorry, will try again. I was not paying close enough attention

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

theo,
Rem autoloading shotgun (pre-model 11), 80% $395.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from theobsession wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

thanks for the price suggestions

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bigeasttx wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Remington started production of the Model 11 around 1905 and made millions off the Browning patten as well as Savage and Winchester. As far as value you goes not a great deal, but on the flip side you have a great shotgun. I have one that was made in 1908 and 1912 and still hunt with both. One in great condition might fetch you 300 bucks the gun is worth more in your gun cabinet.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from nevadany wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

blackdawgz, what are you talking about? "bolts eventually break" & "They are not reliable anyway"?

This is my experience: The only time i had any issue with a Remington not being reliable was when the ejector broke on the gun i mention below...A $5 part and a small fee to the smith had it up and running just fine...that happened 3 years ago...which means my particular shotgun went 102 years before failure...even the number on the barrel matches the reciver.

the Remington M11 and Browning A5 are not the same, but the Remington is a good solid, reliable gun, and as long as it's in good mechanical shape, it is safe to fire. My Remington is a Remington Automatic Shotgun (pre M11), that dates back to the first couple months of production in 1905. I shoot it with no fear.

I've had other M11's in the past and have 1 Browning A5 currently. I would say that are equals in performance, but the Browning has a nicer more refined finish than the Remington, and you pay for that...big time.

Also of note: anything mechanical will break, it's just a matter of time

As to the matter of what its worth...condition is teh most important factor. the Remington's aren't that desireable compared to the Browning, so if you have a plain barrel 12 gauge in good shape, it's probably only worth $200+/-.

I know where there is a 16 gauge, solid rib M11 (1932 production, i think) in pretty good shape for $350...i think that price is a little high and it should be about $250-$300...and that is for a relativley scarce Remington M11

DW

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from hunterdave5 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

depends how good of shape its in

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from Chrisf7469 wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

remington M11 is a great gun! you must keep an eye on the fiber cushion in the rear of the receiver tho if they break or fall out the bolt could crack from hitting the back of the receiver.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

As you know by now, they're not the same thing. Stop shooting it immediately. The bolts eventually break. They are not reliable anyway, since they have only one extractor, as opposed to two for the A-5.. Time to pass it on to a collector and move ahead.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer