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Q:
I'm looking at a used 6" Colt Python 357 stainless, What's it worth. It's in great shape, rifling looks brand new, barely a scratch on the gun. Asking price is 850. Never wanted one before, but now I kinda like the feel of the hand cannon.

Question by Cgull. Uploaded on January 20, 2011

Answers (12)

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from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Sounds like you better grab it up. I was just at an auction last month in Michigan. A 6" python in good condition went for $1150. They also sold an Anaconda for $1500. Both of these guns are highly sought after pieces right now,so $850 is a great price. As with any collectable firearm or collectable for that matter. Base price is a starting ,demand controls the final cost.If you want a Pyton you had better grab it at that price.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Check the prices on Gunbroker and you will see that everone wants top dollar for those guns. I would venture a guess that $850 is reasonable if it is like new. I always thought Colt revolvers were overpriced, including the Python and Diamondbacks, but they are very nice revolvers.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joe Kidd wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

In top condition used, that's a pretty good buy. Don't forget to ask about the box.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I own a Colt Python and I would not sell it at that low price. One of the best Colts ever made.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Best Answer - Chosen by Asker
I paid $150. for my first Python, a small fortune in the Sixties. Then a very reasonable $460. in the Eighties for a Colt Royal Blue beauty w/4" barrel.

Assuming that the Python you are asking about is the original Colt nickel finish and is 99% or better, then it is going to be high dollar. You say it is a limited edition? Is it the Colt Python Elite (the newest version of the Python) or the original Colt Python? If it is the Elite, then it will be shiny stainless steel and not nickel finish. The Elite will have the word "Elite" on the barrel and it is a newer version of the Colt. Also, does your serial number begin with a letter, or only numbers? No letter would make it an even earlier Python.

I paid $900. for a matte-finish stainless steel 4" original Colt Python with original Colt rubber presentation grips about two years ago. I paid a thousand+ for an original Royal Blue 6" Python w/wooden original Colt grips 100% like new this year.

Although it is hard to appraise firearms without seeing them, if your Python is original and 99% complete: $1,000. You can write to Colt firearms and send in your Python's serial number for a complete history of your revolver. Used to be about sixty bucks for that service depending on how fancy you wanted the return letter to be.

Remember, they're not making anymore Pythons so I would consider keeping it (if you are the seller). If you're the buyer offer eight or nine-hundred and see what happens.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

The Python is the Cadillac of the Colt revolver line, and $850 seems to be a very reasonable price. They seem to be going for no less than $1,000 lately. I would advise you to buy it as an investment, esp. as Joe Kidd said, if it comes with the box.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

If you really want a "hand cannon" buy a S&W 460. I own one of those also, you can practice with 45 LC. If you want to kill anything in North America use the 460 round; because of the muzzel brake less flip than the model 29 and 3 times the terminal ballistics.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Joe Kidd should know if anybody does. Good tats, too.

I'm really fond of my old Python and didn't know it was worth quite that much. Paid $90.00 for it second hand back in the late sixties.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I have owned two Pythons in the past, and they were really top-of-the line for fit and finish. I didn't care much for the styling, with the ventilated rib and elongated ejector shroud, but it made for muzzle-heaviness that helped steady that front sight.
In double-action shooting, the Colt trigger tends to stack, with an increasingly heavy pull before the break, whereas the S&W has a more even trigger pull that many prefer.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 90DegreesSouth wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Cgull, if you aren't going to buy that Python, please let me know. That's a great deal based on your description. Make sure it has the original grips; older ones were walnut, and to replace them is at least $250. The box is important for collectors, too. I shoot mine; it's not a safe queen, but it is still worth more than $850. It is the one gun I own that is more accurate than me, and is the sweetest shooting gun ever; very mild with .38 and has minimally increased felt recoil using .357 magnums.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

99 is 100% right about the trigger S&W has always been smoother in my opinion

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Thanks all for your input. Went back to the pawn shop and looked at it again yesterday. I buy guns like I buy cars, I sleep on it for a day or two. I get there and they've jacked the price to 950, so now I'm thinking thrice about buying it.

They did have a Savage 223 mod 12 varmenter mounted on a ultimate sniper stock for 450 that also caught my attention as well as a Win 70 Ultimate Shadow in 223 for 450. both had cheap scopes on them. Been looking for a 223 as well as a hand cannon, decisions decisions. I think I'd jump at the Savage if it wasn't on such a heavy stock.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Check the prices on Gunbroker and you will see that everone wants top dollar for those guns. I would venture a guess that $850 is reasonable if it is like new. I always thought Colt revolvers were overpriced, including the Python and Diamondbacks, but they are very nice revolvers.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Sounds like you better grab it up. I was just at an auction last month in Michigan. A 6" python in good condition went for $1150. They also sold an Anaconda for $1500. Both of these guns are highly sought after pieces right now,so $850 is a great price. As with any collectable firearm or collectable for that matter. Base price is a starting ,demand controls the final cost.If you want a Pyton you had better grab it at that price.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joe Kidd wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

In top condition used, that's a pretty good buy. Don't forget to ask about the box.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I own a Colt Python and I would not sell it at that low price. One of the best Colts ever made.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Best Answer - Chosen by Asker
I paid $150. for my first Python, a small fortune in the Sixties. Then a very reasonable $460. in the Eighties for a Colt Royal Blue beauty w/4" barrel.

Assuming that the Python you are asking about is the original Colt nickel finish and is 99% or better, then it is going to be high dollar. You say it is a limited edition? Is it the Colt Python Elite (the newest version of the Python) or the original Colt Python? If it is the Elite, then it will be shiny stainless steel and not nickel finish. The Elite will have the word "Elite" on the barrel and it is a newer version of the Colt. Also, does your serial number begin with a letter, or only numbers? No letter would make it an even earlier Python.

I paid $900. for a matte-finish stainless steel 4" original Colt Python with original Colt rubber presentation grips about two years ago. I paid a thousand+ for an original Royal Blue 6" Python w/wooden original Colt grips 100% like new this year.

Although it is hard to appraise firearms without seeing them, if your Python is original and 99% complete: $1,000. You can write to Colt firearms and send in your Python's serial number for a complete history of your revolver. Used to be about sixty bucks for that service depending on how fancy you wanted the return letter to be.

Remember, they're not making anymore Pythons so I would consider keeping it (if you are the seller). If you're the buyer offer eight or nine-hundred and see what happens.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Joe Kidd should know if anybody does. Good tats, too.

I'm really fond of my old Python and didn't know it was worth quite that much. Paid $90.00 for it second hand back in the late sixties.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 90DegreesSouth wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Cgull, if you aren't going to buy that Python, please let me know. That's a great deal based on your description. Make sure it has the original grips; older ones were walnut, and to replace them is at least $250. The box is important for collectors, too. I shoot mine; it's not a safe queen, but it is still worth more than $850. It is the one gun I own that is more accurate than me, and is the sweetest shooting gun ever; very mild with .38 and has minimally increased felt recoil using .357 magnums.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

The Python is the Cadillac of the Colt revolver line, and $850 seems to be a very reasonable price. They seem to be going for no less than $1,000 lately. I would advise you to buy it as an investment, esp. as Joe Kidd said, if it comes with the box.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I have owned two Pythons in the past, and they were really top-of-the line for fit and finish. I didn't care much for the styling, with the ventilated rib and elongated ejector shroud, but it made for muzzle-heaviness that helped steady that front sight.
In double-action shooting, the Colt trigger tends to stack, with an increasingly heavy pull before the break, whereas the S&W has a more even trigger pull that many prefer.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

99 is 100% right about the trigger S&W has always been smoother in my opinion

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

If you really want a "hand cannon" buy a S&W 460. I own one of those also, you can practice with 45 LC. If you want to kill anything in North America use the 460 round; because of the muzzel brake less flip than the model 29 and 3 times the terminal ballistics.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Thanks all for your input. Went back to the pawn shop and looked at it again yesterday. I buy guns like I buy cars, I sleep on it for a day or two. I get there and they've jacked the price to 950, so now I'm thinking thrice about buying it.

They did have a Savage 223 mod 12 varmenter mounted on a ultimate sniper stock for 450 that also caught my attention as well as a Win 70 Ultimate Shadow in 223 for 450. both had cheap scopes on them. Been looking for a 223 as well as a hand cannon, decisions decisions. I think I'd jump at the Savage if it wasn't on such a heavy stock.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

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