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Q:
so i should have had a elk but i hit 2 of them and never found them. should i quit hunting because i suck or just practice more?

Question by ford driver. Uploaded on December 04, 2012

Answers (27)

Top Rated
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from Andrew Maxwell wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

never quit hunting! i suggest maybe a higher caliber and more practise!

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

It depends on the circumstances. I suggest you test your marksmanship at a range, shooting from actual hunting positions. You should be able to hit a pie plate at 100 yards every time.
And refrain from taking running shots.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Greenhead wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

What happened, what's the story? From what you have said, you could need more practice with your rifle, a lesson in tracking, education in hunting ethics, or a revocation of your hunting license.

Please elaborate. The guys on here are a great resource. If it is knowledge you lack, they can provide it or tell you where to find it. If, however, you are ignorant of hunting norms and ethics, they will run you through the ringer, but at the end of the day, you will know what to do next time.

If you feel like they are being harsh, keep in mind that most of us are just giving you the same lessons we were taught by our mentors. If it makes it any easier, pretend it is your grandfather telling you you screwed up, instead of some stranger.

Most of us would never tell anyone to quit hunting, but we will be happy to tell you how to hunt in an ethical, humane, and responsible manner. We just need to know the details.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matthew Matzek wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Don't quit. I could give you several famous analogies with the mantra being, "Don't give up!"
As The Great One said, "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take." That doesn't mean shoot willy nilly! It means don't give up!

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from Matthew Matzek wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

PS- I bet yall folks from up North didn't think a Southern feller knew anything about hockey ;) haha!

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from Matthew Matzek wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

PPS- For you Southern fellers who really don't know anything about hockey, "The Great One" is Wayne Gretzky

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Quit shooting at living things until you can hit offhand at the ranges you intend to shoot.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from squirrelgirl wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Please tell me you didn't leave two animals to die and rot somewhere. That has to be one of the biggest sins you could commit.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chewylouie wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I recently found out that if you keep it up you will get it, some how. I never practiced shooting off hand. I missed a deer while I had a steady prop. I stood up and then the deer came out of the woods again and stopped on the other side of the field. Without thinking, I shot at it again, this time off hand. What do you know 45 minutes later I was working on cleaning that deer. I was really down after I missed that deer the first time, and had already missed one deer this year. But when that deer ran across that field and I shot, boy it felt good! I'm not saying don't practice or take shots like I did, but, if you do it right, sooner or later, you will succeed. My first season hunting, I missed 3 or 4 deer within 2 months. But the next one I shot after much practice, paid off, and I killed 2 deer that season, one being a nice 6 point. Don't stop hunting!

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from Del in KS wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Two years ago I wounded a bull that got away after we tracked him into the next day. I stopped hunting after that. Just figured my tag was for one bull and that was him.
WAM gave you good advice. That was not the reason for my poor hit.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Del is bang on. Deer might be another matter but for elk and moose the hunter should hang it up for the season after muffing it the first time. This is particularly true in drawn tag situations. Those areas have specific harvest goals. For management reasons one should not be shooting more than one animal under any circumstances.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ford driver wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

i think that next year i am going to start target practicing a month before the season begins therefor i know if i hit him or not, because this was the first year with the scope so idk what it was. probably the shooter 9 times out of 10 but who knows

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DesertWalker wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Thank you Greenhead, I think that what it is that you had to say is the some of the best advice that could be given.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cb bob wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Don't wait until next year to start practicing, start asap, and as often as possible. You can never be too good a shot! If you shoot off hand on your hunt, shoot off hand in practice. A lot. The confidence you gain in your ability, and your gun, will pay off on your hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from idduckhntr wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

May I suggest some adjustable shooting sticks to help steady your shot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I passed on a 250 yard shot this year because due to the situation and brush, I could not get into a steady sitting shooting position quickly enough to steady up before another cow elk stepped behind the intended target and both desided it was a good time to hit 3rd gear. I won't shoot offhand at that range nor at an unwounded animal that is moving out smartly. That was my only decent opportunity for an elk this year. The others were really not ethical shots for me.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gilltheman wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Well either missing or wounding and animal is an experience that can make one think of quitting hunting. I wounded a spike whitetail a couple years ago and had to finish him off with 2 more arrows. I cried like a little girl at the site of the suffering. I did not quit hunting, just practiced shooting more.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

a month before would be a good start. i can remember when my dad would get ready to go on hunting trips out west, especially his trip to Africa, he was at the range every weekend all summer with the .300 win mag just shooting and shooting and shooting. after work he was in the basement hand loading. the man is as proficient as it gets with a rifle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

not sure of the specifics but it sounds like you need more practice, better decision making or both.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Gosh sorry y'all had no idea it was possible to post that many times. I didn't even do anything!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

It doesn't sound real positive but most hunters get real excited when they get their first big opportunity. Don't give up. Do as much other hunting as you can and keep practicing in field conditions. Not sure what rifle/bullets you are using but that might be an issue too. Finally, learn to track well and don't give up easilyl. Chances are you will get much better and harvest an elk yet.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

You shouldn't quit hunting, but you should practice your shooting more, and perhaps brush up on your tracking skills as well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from gavinboone@hotm... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I don't beleive you should quit. Deffinetly practice alot more. try to put your self in positions you would be in while hunting. Maybe try small game such as rabbits using a shotgun to hone your skills on live animals.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ncarl wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Dont quit it happens to everyone. Someone had to just about put me on suicide watch after the fist half of archery deer season this year. (JK, im not serious)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JPMNTMAN wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Elk are extremely hard to kill even with the big magnums. They tend not to bleed for a while after being shot and cover a great deal of distance before they do start bleeding. My uncle hit one 4 times with a 270 WSM all in a three inch circle in the kill zone. She ran over 150 yards before the first sign of being hit or started bleeding. More info on your set up distance angle might help out.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert Dawson wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Being zero and two is a downer... Invest yourself in Range time, then graduate to shooting at set up clay pigeons at different ranges. If that works for you then bring along a friend to help you track your animal.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pete Dumont wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

Good Advice: Never Give up. Range time is tantamount to success. I shoot at lease 2 times a week in the off season, maybe 5 or 6 rounds each time, but I hit what I aim at. Took me a long time to get this good. prior to the season, Shoot from sticks, prone, kneeling, using brush as rest even your backpack, etc... this will give you the confidence you need to make the kill shot. This year, One BIG bull, One Shot. 455 yards, in the snow and wind. Not bragging, fact. I contribute my success to God, and my diligent practice. You too can do it.
And if you hit one, you should spend days looking for it. That's just ethical.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Quit shooting at living things until you can hit offhand at the ranges you intend to shoot.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

It depends on the circumstances. I suggest you test your marksmanship at a range, shooting from actual hunting positions. You should be able to hit a pie plate at 100 yards every time.
And refrain from taking running shots.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Greenhead wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

What happened, what's the story? From what you have said, you could need more practice with your rifle, a lesson in tracking, education in hunting ethics, or a revocation of your hunting license.

Please elaborate. The guys on here are a great resource. If it is knowledge you lack, they can provide it or tell you where to find it. If, however, you are ignorant of hunting norms and ethics, they will run you through the ringer, but at the end of the day, you will know what to do next time.

If you feel like they are being harsh, keep in mind that most of us are just giving you the same lessons we were taught by our mentors. If it makes it any easier, pretend it is your grandfather telling you you screwed up, instead of some stranger.

Most of us would never tell anyone to quit hunting, but we will be happy to tell you how to hunt in an ethical, humane, and responsible manner. We just need to know the details.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from squirrelgirl wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Please tell me you didn't leave two animals to die and rot somewhere. That has to be one of the biggest sins you could commit.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Del is bang on. Deer might be another matter but for elk and moose the hunter should hang it up for the season after muffing it the first time. This is particularly true in drawn tag situations. Those areas have specific harvest goals. For management reasons one should not be shooting more than one animal under any circumstances.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cb bob wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Don't wait until next year to start practicing, start asap, and as often as possible. You can never be too good a shot! If you shoot off hand on your hunt, shoot off hand in practice. A lot. The confidence you gain in your ability, and your gun, will pay off on your hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I passed on a 250 yard shot this year because due to the situation and brush, I could not get into a steady sitting shooting position quickly enough to steady up before another cow elk stepped behind the intended target and both desided it was a good time to hit 3rd gear. I won't shoot offhand at that range nor at an unwounded animal that is moving out smartly. That was my only decent opportunity for an elk this year. The others were really not ethical shots for me.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

not sure of the specifics but it sounds like you need more practice, better decision making or both.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

It doesn't sound real positive but most hunters get real excited when they get their first big opportunity. Don't give up. Do as much other hunting as you can and keep practicing in field conditions. Not sure what rifle/bullets you are using but that might be an issue too. Finally, learn to track well and don't give up easilyl. Chances are you will get much better and harvest an elk yet.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

You shouldn't quit hunting, but you should practice your shooting more, and perhaps brush up on your tracking skills as well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Andrew Maxwell wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

never quit hunting! i suggest maybe a higher caliber and more practise!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matthew Matzek wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Don't quit. I could give you several famous analogies with the mantra being, "Don't give up!"
As The Great One said, "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take." That doesn't mean shoot willy nilly! It means don't give up!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matthew Matzek wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

PS- I bet yall folks from up North didn't think a Southern feller knew anything about hockey ;) haha!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matthew Matzek wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

PPS- For you Southern fellers who really don't know anything about hockey, "The Great One" is Wayne Gretzky

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chewylouie wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I recently found out that if you keep it up you will get it, some how. I never practiced shooting off hand. I missed a deer while I had a steady prop. I stood up and then the deer came out of the woods again and stopped on the other side of the field. Without thinking, I shot at it again, this time off hand. What do you know 45 minutes later I was working on cleaning that deer. I was really down after I missed that deer the first time, and had already missed one deer this year. But when that deer ran across that field and I shot, boy it felt good! I'm not saying don't practice or take shots like I did, but, if you do it right, sooner or later, you will succeed. My first season hunting, I missed 3 or 4 deer within 2 months. But the next one I shot after much practice, paid off, and I killed 2 deer that season, one being a nice 6 point. Don't stop hunting!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Two years ago I wounded a bull that got away after we tracked him into the next day. I stopped hunting after that. Just figured my tag was for one bull and that was him.
WAM gave you good advice. That was not the reason for my poor hit.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ford driver wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

i think that next year i am going to start target practicing a month before the season begins therefor i know if i hit him or not, because this was the first year with the scope so idk what it was. probably the shooter 9 times out of 10 but who knows

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DesertWalker wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Thank you Greenhead, I think that what it is that you had to say is the some of the best advice that could be given.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from idduckhntr wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

May I suggest some adjustable shooting sticks to help steady your shot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gilltheman wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Well either missing or wounding and animal is an experience that can make one think of quitting hunting. I wounded a spike whitetail a couple years ago and had to finish him off with 2 more arrows. I cried like a little girl at the site of the suffering. I did not quit hunting, just practiced shooting more.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

a month before would be a good start. i can remember when my dad would get ready to go on hunting trips out west, especially his trip to Africa, he was at the range every weekend all summer with the .300 win mag just shooting and shooting and shooting. after work he was in the basement hand loading. the man is as proficient as it gets with a rifle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Gosh sorry y'all had no idea it was possible to post that many times. I didn't even do anything!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from gavinboone@hotm... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I don't beleive you should quit. Deffinetly practice alot more. try to put your self in positions you would be in while hunting. Maybe try small game such as rabbits using a shotgun to hone your skills on live animals.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ncarl wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Dont quit it happens to everyone. Someone had to just about put me on suicide watch after the fist half of archery deer season this year. (JK, im not serious)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JPMNTMAN wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Elk are extremely hard to kill even with the big magnums. They tend not to bleed for a while after being shot and cover a great deal of distance before they do start bleeding. My uncle hit one 4 times with a 270 WSM all in a three inch circle in the kill zone. She ran over 150 yards before the first sign of being hit or started bleeding. More info on your set up distance angle might help out.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert Dawson wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Being zero and two is a downer... Invest yourself in Range time, then graduate to shooting at set up clay pigeons at different ranges. If that works for you then bring along a friend to help you track your animal.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pete Dumont wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

Good Advice: Never Give up. Range time is tantamount to success. I shoot at lease 2 times a week in the off season, maybe 5 or 6 rounds each time, but I hit what I aim at. Took me a long time to get this good. prior to the season, Shoot from sticks, prone, kneeling, using brush as rest even your backpack, etc... this will give you the confidence you need to make the kill shot. This year, One BIG bull, One Shot. 455 yards, in the snow and wind. Not bragging, fact. I contribute my success to God, and my diligent practice. You too can do it.
And if you hit one, you should spend days looking for it. That's just ethical.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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