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Q:
I'm going feral hog hunting in southern Ohio here in the next few weeks. Its going to be an all weekend camp/hunt trip. I have recently got my 22-250 shooting REALLY good. I was thinking about taking it, and trying to get inside 100 yards and taking one well placed vital shot. I do have a 12 Gage slug gun i can take that I know will work but I think that will be over kill. I don't want to be over gunned but at the same time I don't want to be under gunned either. Any thoughts about the 22-250?

Question by drewbeman. Uploaded on March 06, 2013

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from Glenrock wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I think a well placed shot will take down a hog with a 22-250.How many hogs are there in southern ohio? I live in ohio and didnt think there were that many hogs in southern ohio.

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from Pmacc60 wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

You didn't say what bullet you are using,even so 22 250 is on the light side.If you only take perfect shots and use a heavy constructed bullet like nos. 60 gr. partitons it may work ok.It's better to have over kill.JMO

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from Safado wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I don't think the 22-250 is enough gun and I own two! For a small to decent sized sow, maybe. All of my hog hunting is at less than 100 yards, most of it is up close and personal. You do not want to be undergunned trying to finish off a wounded boar. My hog medicine is a 30-06 with open sights using a Barnes 180 grain TSX! Take both use the slug gun as back-up.

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from philbourjaily wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

You are never overgunned for animals that can bite you.
Pigs have a heavy shield of gristle that bullets have to get through before they can reach the vitals. I would shoot the slug gun.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

The .22-250 is too light for an animal that might weigh upwards of 500 pounds wearing an armor plate on its shoulder.
They are not known to present a broadside shot in a National Geographic pose.
I would not consider hunting hogs with anything less than a .30-30.

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from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

If the 250 is all the "rifle" you have, go for it! I'd prefer something between .30-30 and '06. You need some weight to punch through their "shield".
I'd take the slugster over the 250.

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from Sourdough Dave wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

From my experience I do not think that there is such a thing as overkill for feral hogs. However, there is lots of room for too little gun. The fore quarters of feral hogs are armored in layers of fat and cartelige that can cause small fast bullets to not penetrate into the vitals, thus limiting the hunter to going away quartering shots. In my opinion calibers for feral hogs should begin with 3.

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from country road wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I'd use the 12 ga., but don't discount the .22-250 for a shot just under the ear and if there's a chance for long range shots, that might be a good option. I've killed a couple of big hogs with a .22 lr with that shot (it was the only gun I had in the Jeep). You don't want to be just knocking dust off an animal that has tusks and is willing to use them.

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from drewbeman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

We have a pretty decent population In Gallia County, also Vinton county has a really good population to. The 22-250 is the only rifle I have to take out. I have found some 60 grain solid copper bonded bullets. I dont think I will run into a hogzilla around here. The average pig ive heard in these parts is under 200lbs. My buddy going with me will have a 20 gage. I have a 20 gage barrel that I can swap out with my 22-250 barrel. I may just throw that in my pack as well. Thanks for the comments.

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from Treestand wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I have seen Hogs Killed with .22Lr and some Run-off HIT with a 30-06! Best bet take your 20Ga..Open Choke and some Rem-CopperSolid slugs..along with your .22-250 by NO means will you be under-guned, the best eating Hogs are in the 100# to 175# range. Best of luck....
Safe Hunting

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from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I'm talking Russian boars here... not farm pigs. I have personally witnessed a .357 Mag from 20 yards being stopped dead with less than 1/8 inch of penetration in the chest of a 350 pound charging boar. Their shield, built up over thousands of years of evolution to protect them from razor sharp tuskers, is very similar to three inch thick leather. The guide on that trip said it was the norm and that he had witnessed .270 Win 130g bullets stopped the same way. I believe him.

If you are walking rather than up in a tree, the boar may be charging you when you see it. They do that for no good reason... not just when they are wounded. I have been charged by three boars over 300 pounds in unprovoked attacks. They accellerate faster than a lion and reach top speeds equivalant to a deer. You won't find many well placed shots in these circumstances.

Their skull is thick and severely slanted back from their snout. Attempted brain shots often richochet in a frontal attack without doing leathal damage. In one attack, I hit a 325 pounder right between the eyes at 20 yards with a .44 Mag 240g jacketed hollow point. It did just that.

If I am stalking porkers, I don't use a .44 Mag anymore and I definitely would NEVER use a 22-250. If you have a shot at one posing at 100 yards broadside, it would be fine... just don't expect to see shots like that. If the boar is not charging you, it is likely to be surrounded by limbs and bushes so thick, you will have difficulty seeing it. Have you ever attempted to shoot a 22-250 through brush? It doesn't work.

The 12 gauge slug is the opposite of a 22-250. It is heavy and crashes through brush but stays on path to the target. It WILL penetrate the shield of a big boar and it imparts enough energy to STOP a charging boar. For example, I witnessed a charging (unnprovoked) 325 pound boar shot in the shield at 10 yards with a 12 gauge slug. It was killed instantly but slid all the way up to the shooter's feet and rolled over. A perfect shot. He may have been killed with a 22-250. If you are walking, take the 12 gauge.

If you are hunting over bait from a treestand, you can use a .22LR or the rifle of your choice. You can wait for a perfect brain shot and you are not at risk of death or dismemberment.

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from drewbeman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

These are not Russian boars,they are just regular ole feral hogs.

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from youngfisherman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

you will be fine with your 22-250 just shoot them behind the ear. I use a 22 mag to hut them and i shoot them behind the ear drops them like a rock.
Remember to watch the wind they can be spooky

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from jhjimbo wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

In the middle east we were hunting boars and one guy in some cover had one come right at him moving fast to get away from the drivers. He had a 12ga with double ought shot and hit it twice. It kept coming and ran right over him and the tusk slashed his calf open on the way by. We took him to the hospital and he was there over two weeks and almost lost his leg from infection. Take the biggest gun you have on your hunt. good luck

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

DakotaMan is right. I believe feral hogs in the U.S. are descended for Russian boars, and are every bit as big and mean.
In countries where they co-exist with tigers, wild hogs are the main food source, but many times a tiger is gored to death by a wild boar in self defense.
Be guided accordingly.

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from Treestand wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

You were WARNED The life you save may be YOURS!!

Its better to be OVER GUNNED Then NOT!!

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from Pmacc60 wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Most of the answers come from guys and thier experience, they are doing thier best not to preach.You have been given some very good advice,Treestand put an explanation point on it with his last post.Good luck

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from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Drewbreman, will your quarry range in size to over 300 pounds? Will the the boars have razor sharp tusks over three inches in length? Will they be descendants of feral hogs from the south east? Will they be expected to make unprovoked attacks? Will you be hunting in thick brush? Will you be hunting on foot? Do you understand what a two inch deep cut on your leg feels like?

If the answer to any of these questions is "yes", please consider bringing enough gun. If youngfisherman is doing this with a .22LR, I wish him well and hope his organ donor card is up to date.

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from youngfisherman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

DakodaMan I am using a 22WMR not a 22LR.

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from Brock Holloway wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

22-250 should work just fine, i shot a 175 pound hog a couple years ago with a 243 and droped it. But i did nick the heart.

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from mike0714 wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Sure you can do it with a .22 250 or even a .22 WMR but I just want to say the last feral that turned on me took two 350 grain rounds from my 45-70 and slid to a stop 5 feet from me and the idot who ut shot it with a bow. The first shot went through the left front of the shoulder and through the left lung the second round went through the bottom of the skull and into the chest cavity. Note my 45-70 round work up produces just over 3000 foot lbs of energy. Given my hunting group got roped into taking a friends new boy toy and my job was to quickly put down any hogs he shot bad. when he went 2/3on gut shots with a bow then we took his weapon away from him. (we shot for 25 yards on our knees. when he shot the hog spun a few times trying for the arrow then charged us) Take both and use the shotgun for the majority of your hunting and keep the 22-250 for yotes and piglets.

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from mike0714 wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

idiot and no ut sorry about the spelling errors

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from drewbeman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I dont think the hogs around here are that intense. I have heard of a few 300 pounders and a few at 400lbs but the majority are under 150lbs i think. Im kinda scared to think about the pigs you guys are after!lol Are you all hunting pure russian boar?

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Feral hogs are known as the poor man's grizzly bear, and just about as safe to hunt if you are sure you won't run across a big one.
Count on it. That's what guardian angels are for.
Living life on the edge can be very exciting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Drew, I grew up on a farm and fed big hogs my whole life. I wasn't too concerned about my first feral hog hunt. Shooting another pig just didn't seem too exciting to me. During that first hunt, I quickly realized that these are VERY wild hogs and they bare a much stronger resemblance to a rhinocerous than they do a farm hog.

They have learned to survive in the wild by being tough and by being mean. The boars are very territorial and will attack you when you enter their territory. You may not see them before they charge. I have carried my pistol at the ready and wasn't able to pull it up for a shot before they made it to me; they were that fast.

I'm frankly surprised that we don'g hear more about people being killed by them. I suspect it is because most of us manly men don't want others to know how stupid we were to hunt feral hogs with a pop gun. I'd simply suggest that you plan to be overgunned until you get a little experience and can make up your own mind.

youngfisherman, my appologies... .22 WMR it is... please keep those organ donor cards up to date. Little pigs abound but they have a granddaddy running around somewhere out there and you might meet him up close and personal one day.

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from drewbeman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Yeah i think im taking my pump gun with us to just in case. That will give us two pump guns and a rifle if we get a distance shot.Those hornady sst slugs at 2,000 feet per second should do the trick out of the ole Remington!

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from PigHunter wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I agree with those recommending the slug gun. Wild pigs are much tougher than deer. A few years ago I had to put two 12 gauge slugs in one to put it down. I've also had to shoot one twice with a .45-70.

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from Safado wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

This is why I love this blog. Drewbeman asked a great question and got a lot of great information from guys that know what they're taliking about. Great job!

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from youngfisherman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Forgot to mention never try to shoot them between the eyes they have a very thick scull plate it can deflect smaller calibers

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from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I'm talking Russian boars here... not farm pigs. I have personally witnessed a .357 Mag from 20 yards being stopped dead with less than 1/8 inch of penetration in the chest of a 350 pound charging boar. Their shield, built up over thousands of years of evolution to protect them from razor sharp tuskers, is very similar to three inch thick leather. The guide on that trip said it was the norm and that he had witnessed .270 Win 130g bullets stopped the same way. I believe him.

If you are walking rather than up in a tree, the boar may be charging you when you see it. They do that for no good reason... not just when they are wounded. I have been charged by three boars over 300 pounds in unprovoked attacks. They accellerate faster than a lion and reach top speeds equivalant to a deer. You won't find many well placed shots in these circumstances.

Their skull is thick and severely slanted back from their snout. Attempted brain shots often richochet in a frontal attack without doing leathal damage. In one attack, I hit a 325 pounder right between the eyes at 20 yards with a .44 Mag 240g jacketed hollow point. It did just that.

If I am stalking porkers, I don't use a .44 Mag anymore and I definitely would NEVER use a 22-250. If you have a shot at one posing at 100 yards broadside, it would be fine... just don't expect to see shots like that. If the boar is not charging you, it is likely to be surrounded by limbs and bushes so thick, you will have difficulty seeing it. Have you ever attempted to shoot a 22-250 through brush? It doesn't work.

The 12 gauge slug is the opposite of a 22-250. It is heavy and crashes through brush but stays on path to the target. It WILL penetrate the shield of a big boar and it imparts enough energy to STOP a charging boar. For example, I witnessed a charging (unnprovoked) 325 pound boar shot in the shield at 10 yards with a 12 gauge slug. It was killed instantly but slid all the way up to the shooter's feet and rolled over. A perfect shot. He may have been killed with a 22-250. If you are walking, take the 12 gauge.

If you are hunting over bait from a treestand, you can use a .22LR or the rifle of your choice. You can wait for a perfect brain shot and you are not at risk of death or dismemberment.

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from Pmacc60 wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

You didn't say what bullet you are using,even so 22 250 is on the light side.If you only take perfect shots and use a heavy constructed bullet like nos. 60 gr. partitons it may work ok.It's better to have over kill.JMO

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

You are never overgunned for animals that can bite you.
Pigs have a heavy shield of gristle that bullets have to get through before they can reach the vitals. I would shoot the slug gun.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

The .22-250 is too light for an animal that might weigh upwards of 500 pounds wearing an armor plate on its shoulder.
They are not known to present a broadside shot in a National Geographic pose.
I would not consider hunting hogs with anything less than a .30-30.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I have seen Hogs Killed with .22Lr and some Run-off HIT with a 30-06! Best bet take your 20Ga..Open Choke and some Rem-CopperSolid slugs..along with your .22-250 by NO means will you be under-guned, the best eating Hogs are in the 100# to 175# range. Best of luck....
Safe Hunting

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from mike0714 wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Sure you can do it with a .22 250 or even a .22 WMR but I just want to say the last feral that turned on me took two 350 grain rounds from my 45-70 and slid to a stop 5 feet from me and the idot who ut shot it with a bow. The first shot went through the left front of the shoulder and through the left lung the second round went through the bottom of the skull and into the chest cavity. Note my 45-70 round work up produces just over 3000 foot lbs of energy. Given my hunting group got roped into taking a friends new boy toy and my job was to quickly put down any hogs he shot bad. when he went 2/3on gut shots with a bow then we took his weapon away from him. (we shot for 25 yards on our knees. when he shot the hog spun a few times trying for the arrow then charged us) Take both and use the shotgun for the majority of your hunting and keep the 22-250 for yotes and piglets.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Safado wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I don't think the 22-250 is enough gun and I own two! For a small to decent sized sow, maybe. All of my hog hunting is at less than 100 yards, most of it is up close and personal. You do not want to be undergunned trying to finish off a wounded boar. My hog medicine is a 30-06 with open sights using a Barnes 180 grain TSX! Take both use the slug gun as back-up.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sourdough Dave wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

From my experience I do not think that there is such a thing as overkill for feral hogs. However, there is lots of room for too little gun. The fore quarters of feral hogs are armored in layers of fat and cartelige that can cause small fast bullets to not penetrate into the vitals, thus limiting the hunter to going away quartering shots. In my opinion calibers for feral hogs should begin with 3.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I'd use the 12 ga., but don't discount the .22-250 for a shot just under the ear and if there's a chance for long range shots, that might be a good option. I've killed a couple of big hogs with a .22 lr with that shot (it was the only gun I had in the Jeep). You don't want to be just knocking dust off an animal that has tusks and is willing to use them.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jhjimbo wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

In the middle east we were hunting boars and one guy in some cover had one come right at him moving fast to get away from the drivers. He had a 12ga with double ought shot and hit it twice. It kept coming and ran right over him and the tusk slashed his calf open on the way by. We took him to the hospital and he was there over two weeks and almost lost his leg from infection. Take the biggest gun you have on your hunt. good luck

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

DakotaMan is right. I believe feral hogs in the U.S. are descended for Russian boars, and are every bit as big and mean.
In countries where they co-exist with tigers, wild hogs are the main food source, but many times a tiger is gored to death by a wild boar in self defense.
Be guided accordingly.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

You were WARNED The life you save may be YOURS!!

Its better to be OVER GUNNED Then NOT!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pmacc60 wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Most of the answers come from guys and thier experience, they are doing thier best not to preach.You have been given some very good advice,Treestand put an explanation point on it with his last post.Good luck

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Drewbreman, will your quarry range in size to over 300 pounds? Will the the boars have razor sharp tusks over three inches in length? Will they be descendants of feral hogs from the south east? Will they be expected to make unprovoked attacks? Will you be hunting in thick brush? Will you be hunting on foot? Do you understand what a two inch deep cut on your leg feels like?

If the answer to any of these questions is "yes", please consider bringing enough gun. If youngfisherman is doing this with a .22LR, I wish him well and hope his organ donor card is up to date.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mike0714 wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

idiot and no ut sorry about the spelling errors

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Feral hogs are known as the poor man's grizzly bear, and just about as safe to hunt if you are sure you won't run across a big one.
Count on it. That's what guardian angels are for.
Living life on the edge can be very exciting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Drew, I grew up on a farm and fed big hogs my whole life. I wasn't too concerned about my first feral hog hunt. Shooting another pig just didn't seem too exciting to me. During that first hunt, I quickly realized that these are VERY wild hogs and they bare a much stronger resemblance to a rhinocerous than they do a farm hog.

They have learned to survive in the wild by being tough and by being mean. The boars are very territorial and will attack you when you enter their territory. You may not see them before they charge. I have carried my pistol at the ready and wasn't able to pull it up for a shot before they made it to me; they were that fast.

I'm frankly surprised that we don'g hear more about people being killed by them. I suspect it is because most of us manly men don't want others to know how stupid we were to hunt feral hogs with a pop gun. I'd simply suggest that you plan to be overgunned until you get a little experience and can make up your own mind.

youngfisherman, my appologies... .22 WMR it is... please keep those organ donor cards up to date. Little pigs abound but they have a granddaddy running around somewhere out there and you might meet him up close and personal one day.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from drewbeman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Yeah i think im taking my pump gun with us to just in case. That will give us two pump guns and a rifle if we get a distance shot.Those hornady sst slugs at 2,000 feet per second should do the trick out of the ole Remington!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PigHunter wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I agree with those recommending the slug gun. Wild pigs are much tougher than deer. A few years ago I had to put two 12 gauge slugs in one to put it down. I've also had to shoot one twice with a .45-70.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Safado wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

This is why I love this blog. Drewbeman asked a great question and got a lot of great information from guys that know what they're taliking about. Great job!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from youngfisherman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

Forgot to mention never try to shoot them between the eyes they have a very thick scull plate it can deflect smaller calibers

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Glenrock wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I think a well placed shot will take down a hog with a 22-250.How many hogs are there in southern ohio? I live in ohio and didnt think there were that many hogs in southern ohio.

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from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

If the 250 is all the "rifle" you have, go for it! I'd prefer something between .30-30 and '06. You need some weight to punch through their "shield".
I'd take the slugster over the 250.

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from drewbeman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

We have a pretty decent population In Gallia County, also Vinton county has a really good population to. The 22-250 is the only rifle I have to take out. I have found some 60 grain solid copper bonded bullets. I dont think I will run into a hogzilla around here. The average pig ive heard in these parts is under 200lbs. My buddy going with me will have a 20 gage. I have a 20 gage barrel that I can swap out with my 22-250 barrel. I may just throw that in my pack as well. Thanks for the comments.

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from drewbeman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

These are not Russian boars,they are just regular ole feral hogs.

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from youngfisherman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

you will be fine with your 22-250 just shoot them behind the ear. I use a 22 mag to hut them and i shoot them behind the ear drops them like a rock.
Remember to watch the wind they can be spooky

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from drewbeman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I dont think the hogs around here are that intense. I have heard of a few 300 pounders and a few at 400lbs but the majority are under 150lbs i think. Im kinda scared to think about the pigs you guys are after!lol Are you all hunting pure russian boar?

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from youngfisherman wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

DakodaMan I am using a 22WMR not a 22LR.

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from Brock Holloway wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

22-250 should work just fine, i shot a 175 pound hog a couple years ago with a 243 and droped it. But i did nick the heart.

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