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Q:
Update on my dog. Back in august I made a post about my pointer-all thanks to Phil Bourjaily, RES1956, and PAshooter, I've got me one heck a pointing dog now. She works close to us (I picked that tip up from an old F&S article about the 5 minute drill, walking around and taking sharp turns with your dog on a check cord), she has learned the woah command, and she is just a joy to be with in field. She quit chasing the birds when they fly up, and she points steady now too and she's got a pretty awesome nose. So thank yall a lot.

Question by outdoorsman170. Uploaded on November 04, 2012

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

My Brittany pup is doing very well this year in spite of poor bird population. She set us up very nicely for four roosters yesterday. I shot three of them. That was an exceptional day. She still breaks after the birds fly but I don't have a big problem with that. Hard for her to stay put when the two flushing labs run after them. One rooster held so tight up against a Russian olive that I eventually reached in to push the grass away and see what she was after (thinking it was probably a porcupine). Rooster almost hit me in the face when it got up. That pup WOULD NOT MOVE. She had just nailed down another rooster and we walked by her in the tall grass. I didn't notice her bell had stopped ringing because we were watching my lab who was birdy ahead of us. I went by both bird and dog about two feet away and she never moved. Four days ago I knocked down a sharptail in the open country on the way back to the vehicle. Two labs took off after the flock and a late riser came my way so I took a long shot. Broke a wing and only the pup saw it go down. She caught it three times before she had the wherewithal to hang on. Boy did that experience light a fire under her! First time she has had a live bird to herself. Then yesterday my younger lab caught a hen that was clearly too young to fly. My buddy held Opal and I tried to throw it in the air. The pup, Coral, was on it in a shot. Yep, she's really excited now. I had trouble with her (and Opal) ranging too far but some serious discipline and perseverance are paying off. I have also, for the first time in my life, elected to use a whistle. She is a very small dog even for a Britt and I think it's often hard for her to hear my vocal calls in the tall stuff. Anyway, things are starting to shape up. Shame there aren't more birds.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Some trainers insist that their dogs be steady to wing and shot, but steady on point is all that I demand.
Besides, I consider it a plus that the dog be off and running as soon as the bird takes wing.
Some trainers insist that their dogs be sitting while delivering a bird to hand, but I'll settle for having the bird dropped at my feet.

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from Hoski wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Great to hear success stories.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I'm with you, 99ex. I'm not a stickler for finesse. If birds aren't lost and the dogs have a good time, I'm happy. Tonight I knocked down a pheasant that hit the hill in front of me and was off and running instantly. The dogs were on their way as soon as I shot but I sank his ship with another round just to be sure. I have lost too many of those crippled roadrunners even when the dogs were on top of them when they went down. The pup did a fine job of tracking down the third and final bird. I folded it with a long shot. He ran into the thick stuff and doubled back. Little Coral saw it fall and stuck with it. What a racket in there! Finally she held it down till Opal and Pearl arrived. It wasn't real pretty today but we didn't lose any birds and that's what counts. And I never missed a shot either. For a change! Down side is it took about ten miles of walking to get three birds.

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from RES1956 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I'm glad you got what you were looking for, although I don't think any of the aforementioned will claim credit for any of it. After all, you are the one who trained the dog.
Keep putting the dog on birds and it will just get better and if there is something you want to tweak, time in the field will show you what it is.

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from RES1956 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

@99,
While I agree with you to some extent, a dog delivering a crippled pheasant usually needs to put it in my hand instead of dropping it on the ground at my feet. Funny how pheasants view this as parole granted and are too often gone again once their feet hit the ground.
This action by the dog also indicates that 'force fetch' (hold until commanded to drop) was not finished with the dog, and force fetch lays the foundation for far too much further training to skip or cut short, JMHO,,,

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I'm with you, 99ex. I'm not a stickler for finesse. If birds aren't lost and the dogs have a good time, I'm happy. Tonight I knocked down a pheasant that hit the hill in front of me and was off and running instantly. The dogs were on their way as soon as I shot but I sank his ship with another round just to be sure. I have lost too many of those crippled roadrunners even when the dogs were on top of them when they went down. The pup did a fine job of tracking down the third and final bird. I folded it with a long shot. He ran into the thick stuff and doubled back. Little Coral saw it fall and stuck with it. What a racket in there! Finally she held it down till Opal and Pearl arrived. It wasn't real pretty today but we didn't lose any birds and that's what counts. And I never missed a shot either. For a change! Down side is it took about ten miles of walking to get three birds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

My Brittany pup is doing very well this year in spite of poor bird population. She set us up very nicely for four roosters yesterday. I shot three of them. That was an exceptional day. She still breaks after the birds fly but I don't have a big problem with that. Hard for her to stay put when the two flushing labs run after them. One rooster held so tight up against a Russian olive that I eventually reached in to push the grass away and see what she was after (thinking it was probably a porcupine). Rooster almost hit me in the face when it got up. That pup WOULD NOT MOVE. She had just nailed down another rooster and we walked by her in the tall grass. I didn't notice her bell had stopped ringing because we were watching my lab who was birdy ahead of us. I went by both bird and dog about two feet away and she never moved. Four days ago I knocked down a sharptail in the open country on the way back to the vehicle. Two labs took off after the flock and a late riser came my way so I took a long shot. Broke a wing and only the pup saw it go down. She caught it three times before she had the wherewithal to hang on. Boy did that experience light a fire under her! First time she has had a live bird to herself. Then yesterday my younger lab caught a hen that was clearly too young to fly. My buddy held Opal and I tried to throw it in the air. The pup, Coral, was on it in a shot. Yep, she's really excited now. I had trouble with her (and Opal) ranging too far but some serious discipline and perseverance are paying off. I have also, for the first time in my life, elected to use a whistle. She is a very small dog even for a Britt and I think it's often hard for her to hear my vocal calls in the tall stuff. Anyway, things are starting to shape up. Shame there aren't more birds.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Some trainers insist that their dogs be steady to wing and shot, but steady on point is all that I demand.
Besides, I consider it a plus that the dog be off and running as soon as the bird takes wing.
Some trainers insist that their dogs be sitting while delivering a bird to hand, but I'll settle for having the bird dropped at my feet.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hoski wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Great to hear success stories.

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from RES1956 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I'm glad you got what you were looking for, although I don't think any of the aforementioned will claim credit for any of it. After all, you are the one who trained the dog.
Keep putting the dog on birds and it will just get better and if there is something you want to tweak, time in the field will show you what it is.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

@99,
While I agree with you to some extent, a dog delivering a crippled pheasant usually needs to put it in my hand instead of dropping it on the ground at my feet. Funny how pheasants view this as parole granted and are too often gone again once their feet hit the ground.
This action by the dog also indicates that 'force fetch' (hold until commanded to drop) was not finished with the dog, and force fetch lays the foundation for far too much further training to skip or cut short, JMHO,,,

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