Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

AnswersASK YOUR QUESTION

Answers

Q:
I have read a few articles on this subject, and I think one was in F&S. The subject is that your bird dog should think of himself only as a "work dog". This meaning that you shouldn't baby him and let him in the house at your feet by the fire or feed him table scraps and so on. Basically, seperate him as a work dog and don't let him be a family dog. What say you?

Question by Matthew Matzek. Uploaded on December 04, 2012

Answers (27)

Top Rated
All Answers
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Couldn't be more wrong IMO. (in my opinion) My bird dogs are my best buddies, and we hunt together as a working team. Each one has to have a vocabulary of 50 words, or more because they live in the house around me, communicate a great deal with me, and learn commands everyday living with me. Hunting season is short. My great relationship with my dogs lasts all year long. Having just a kenneled dog using it for a short period of time each year says something about the personality of the owner IMO. I say, "lets go get the mail." and they walk down to the end of the street, heal, waiting for cars to go by, and then the command to cross. People drive by staring at my dogs healing. And when I shower in the morning, they smell the pants I put on, and know whether we are going hunting, or not. And it takes a lot of money spent training your dog professionally if you only have a kenneled dog to perform as well in the field as myself, and my dog...just don't factor in my bad shooting lately! And mine ride well in the back of my SUV in comfort out to the hunting site.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dcast wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I recently became a member of a hunt club and became friends with several guys there that have various types of dogs some retrievers, pointers, etc... and all of them a hunting dogs and all are treated as if family members or best friends. The dogs know when they are to hunt and when to be a friend. Dogs know when to work and not too, they have been breeded for centuries to hunt and it is in them to do so naturally and the willingly do it. They are also very affectionate even though being hunters they strive to please their master. So I don't think it is an issue, but that is up for debate. I know plenty with both points of view. The key is teaching them when to work and when to play.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from redfishunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

from my experience, most people who keep there dogs strictly as working dogs rather than pets do so for emotional reasons. A lot of things can happen to a hunting dog, and it's tough on the master.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Lots of guys that own hunting dogs spend money having them trained, have them kenelled all year long, and it is in large part an ego thing. They brag to their buddies what an incredible dog they have, papered with all kinds of credentials/pedigree, and they mainly want to be a blowhard around their buddies. Mine, are first and foremost, my best friends, and that is why I have no qualms about telling folks my older, Black Lab is a mutt! And an incredible mutt in the field!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I could give you a lenghty answer with numerous reasons why this is not true, but to make it short- Bull S***.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Redfish, no pain no gain.

Everyone on here knows my dogs are my life now. Couldn't live without them and I don't think they would do so hot without me either. That's the kind of relationship that makes a working dog work well. I'm sitting at the kitchen table writing this and all three are competing for a spot against my feet. Little Coral usually wins because the complex network of legs and supports under this antique oak dining table makes it pretty tight quarters down there.

My dogs perform well because they really want to please me not because it's conditioned into them. Conditioned hunting dogs will do the same job and often even better, but there's something essential that's missing. Love between a dog and its job will never compare to love between a dog and his hunter.

I'm a firm believer that most dogs will work better with less training time expended if they are raised in the house. It takes more time and effort to condition a dog that's kenneled. From day to day (actually minute to minute) interaction a dog raised in the house learns how you think and that's a huge advantage ... in every respect.

Every year I see all these guys showing up to hunt in Montana with dog trailers and crates thrown in the back of their four-door trucks. I can just about bet those pooches are kenneled and it often shows in the field. Two fellas from Alabama I met at the bird refuge were incredulous that I was running three dogs at once (they had a trailer full of em), two flushers with a pointer. Oh, you can't do that! It's impossible to manage them, pointer will learn the wrong tricks, etc., etc. Baloney. As I stood talking to them the three dogs were sitting patiently next to me. At the end of that blistering windy sub-zero day my dogs climbed in the back of my warm Jimmy. Meanwhile all but one of their four or five pointing dogs had been crammed into cold aluminum boxes. Sorry, if someone did that to me I wouldn't work very well. Those guys read too many magazines and watched too many videos. Their dogs might work well (I didn't see them in action) but those fellas don't have a clue about what a hunter with a dog is really supposed to get out of being in the field together. Birds? Pffft! Those things are just a smelly sack of feathers. Companionship, teamwork, love, and mutual respect. Those are the rewards that fill the heart and soul even if the bag is empty. Why stop reaping them just because you're done hunting?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Dcast, the key to training your dog is to make the work be play. A lot of guys forget that when they're training their dogs. If the dog enjoys what it's doing it will always strive to do it better.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

hell no. my brittany is an excellent house dog and companion. since i was in 6th grade that dog has slept on the end of my bed. when i go out and do little errands she sits in the passenger seat next to me, i take her out to get the mail, ect. she is two different dogs i like to put it. a companion in the house, and a killing machine in the field. completely different animal when she hops out of the truck to hunt. focused and driven.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Here's the flip side to what I said, and Ontario said. A good hunting lab, for instance, is a motivated, bullheaded dog. Often times, living around the house they get away with things. Rules get broken. When you have a command, a rule with a lab you had better follow it ALL THE TIME. That lab, and especially a male lab, knows he can break rules when you don't persist in demanding they get followed! When you are not consistent. That is why some dog trainers will breakdown a strong minded male lab, and let them know in no uncertain terms who is boss, and now it is do as I command, or else, and they get the needed results. Often owners are too compassionite, and give in when the dog is a family member. It is a fine line you live if you want a good hunting dog that always responds to command. And I can't say I always do it right. I will always follow the notion my dogs are family members. And my wife can be a problem. She will be the one that gives in, and they go to her rather than following my orders.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from redfishunter wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Also, most dogs I've hunted with that run deer, rabbits, or squirrels are strictly hunting dogs. I don't know of anyone with a retriever that isn't a pet.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Many duck retrieving labs are not pets...kept kenneled up, and go for days with no attention given.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

We all should know enough to be conservative about the table scraps. Not good for their teeth for one thing. Can also cause weight problems. Just because the dog lives in your house doesn't mean it has to eat your food.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Trapper Vic wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

If a dog is trained correctly, his instinct to hunt will always be there. Most dogs are purchased thinking they already know the rules. Train him right and let him sleep, at the end of the bed!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

"If a dog is trained correctly" That statement takes in a lot of territory, and a lot of amateurs use terrible techniuqes in performing their own amateur training methods. And it depends on what your goals are, and how well you want your dog to perform in the field. I just watched the waterfowl retrieving trials I believe they called them, and I seriously doubt there is anyone on this thread that has trained their dogs to perform even close to how those dogs performed.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

So what? I lost one pheasant this past season but came home with nine that I didn't shoot. But they'r not supposed to do that according to some definition of perfection defined by who knows. My dogs will break at the shot. Big deal! The fact that they do has saved me a lot more crippled birds than it has cost me. But it's not "good performance" according to someone's rules. Pfffft! Hunting my Britt pup with flushing dogs is supposed to ruin her. Says someone who writes articles for magazines and may or may not have experience engineering dogs to "perform" according to Hoyle. Hasn't proved to be the case.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Safado wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Ontario Honker,
It warms my heart to read your thoughts about your dog. I have a great dog, he's not a hunter but he is definitely one of my best friends. I take him when I run errands and when I come back to the car he is always sitting behind the wheel in the driver's seat waiting for me to return.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Heck, my big black Lab knows what I am about to do before I do. He guards the truck and home, protects my wife, and is my constant companion. I don't go many places without him except to work. His sidekick, the little yellow lab pup, hasn't figured all that out yet. My dawgs sleep in the house and eat a premium brand of dog food and the occasional bite of people food, but I would never feed any of my dawgs a heavy diet of people food. Not good for them. My dawgs live a pretty petted existence, but they will hit the icy water and marshes with as much enthusiasm as a kennel dog. Big dawg made a quarter mile retrieve on a goose today that I didn't even see go down that was sailed by another hunter way down the field. He locked on and away he went. I saw him headed in a safe direction with that body language that says, "I got him, Pops!", so I didn't whistle him back. I could see something in the field and thought it might be a blowing plastic bag, but he came back with a crippled goose. He is a purebred Lab from good stock, but otherwise spoiled rotten.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

OHH,

I think Brave has grabbed more ducks than I ever shot over the years. If there is a duck in 40 acres of standing corn, he will find it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

WA MTNhunter...That's nothin. My old Black Mutt can find a duck in 50 acres of standing corn.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dh_jaxd wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

It really bothers me when some people say a working dog can't be a pet too.... Form a tight bond with that working dog by allowing him into your home and experiencing everyday life and you will have a working dog that will do anything for you, without hesitation. That said, some dogs just are not cut out to be good working dogs and that has nothing to do with being pets or being kennel dogs.... Dogs live for their owner though and thrive off of companionship. A good dog will learn so much more if you integrate him into your home and family. It will not ruin their working attitude to be a pet. My best working dogs have also been my best friends.....that tight bond between working dog and master is one of beauty and cannot be duplicated by a dog who is kenneled with little to no human interaction except at working times. Enjoy your dog.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

DH..Just remember the problems that I presented when you make a dog a family member pet. I would never have a hunting dog that isn't a member of the family, and lives indoors with me, BUT....that brings on problems that I have brought up, and dog owners should undertand them.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Hmmmm. How a duck wound up in the middle of fifty acres of standing corn would seem to me to be a mystery worth investigating. It didn't fly in there, that's for sure. I have seen some cripples drop a ways away but ... Okay, let me do the math here ... If 50 acres = 5 columns of 10 acres each, then on the short side this parcel would be five acres across with each acre being 66' x 660'. If the duck found is in the middle of the short side of the 50 acre parcel (measured on each acre's short side) and shooter was on the edge, then the quacker fell ... 66 feet x 5 columns divided by 2 or 165 feet from the shooter. That's 55 yards. Okay, I guess it's doable. How are my calculations?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Clinchknot, I have never had any of the problems that you have brought up and I have been raising dogs in my home for almost fifty years. Wait a minute ... what are the problems that you "presented" anyway. I can't seem to find any. Ummm ... let's see. Ah, I see ... your dog wants to listen to your wife instead of you. Wellll ... Okay, maybe I better not go there. :-)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Sounds easy enough to me without the need of a calculator. Duck angles down having been hit, and crashes and burns in a 50 acre section of standing corn. If we could get an old hunting buddy of mine who now lives in Anchorage, AK on the phone he would remember the incredible mallard shooting we had with him and I hidden in the standing corn with a big irrigation ditch nearby the field. Problably my incredible calling that brought them in close circling our standing corn, but it was one fine day of duck hunting.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

my dog doesnt get human food of any kind but other than that he has the run of the place. and he NEVER sleeps outside if i dont!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Glad someone bit at the bait. The "flip side" to my calculation is that a duck could just as easily have landed in the middle of the long side of a fifty acre parcel which would be 1,100 yards from the edge.* Yikes. That would be one slow drift to the ground with a broken wing! Greenheads packing parachutes these days? Without a database of various measured wounded duck drops, randomness can be crudely taken into consideration by simply averaging the two calculations. The average duck drop into the "middle" of a fifty acre parcel would therefore be 55 yards + 1,100 yards divided by 2 = 577.5 yards. Old Pearl is pretty good at retrieving geese from the worst kind of stuff and at incredible distances ... but six hundred yards? Gee, this was fun. We should have more of this kind of thing on here.

* A 10 acre row (long side of the parcel) x 660 feet/acre (the long side of an acre) divided by 2 (the center) = 3,300 feet = 1,100 yards

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Onario..bit the bait? You are too dense. WAMtnhunter was being braggadose, and I was just heaping it on. Both of us will have to use footnotes to our post to clue you in next time.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Redfish, no pain no gain.

Everyone on here knows my dogs are my life now. Couldn't live without them and I don't think they would do so hot without me either. That's the kind of relationship that makes a working dog work well. I'm sitting at the kitchen table writing this and all three are competing for a spot against my feet. Little Coral usually wins because the complex network of legs and supports under this antique oak dining table makes it pretty tight quarters down there.

My dogs perform well because they really want to please me not because it's conditioned into them. Conditioned hunting dogs will do the same job and often even better, but there's something essential that's missing. Love between a dog and its job will never compare to love between a dog and his hunter.

I'm a firm believer that most dogs will work better with less training time expended if they are raised in the house. It takes more time and effort to condition a dog that's kenneled. From day to day (actually minute to minute) interaction a dog raised in the house learns how you think and that's a huge advantage ... in every respect.

Every year I see all these guys showing up to hunt in Montana with dog trailers and crates thrown in the back of their four-door trucks. I can just about bet those pooches are kenneled and it often shows in the field. Two fellas from Alabama I met at the bird refuge were incredulous that I was running three dogs at once (they had a trailer full of em), two flushers with a pointer. Oh, you can't do that! It's impossible to manage them, pointer will learn the wrong tricks, etc., etc. Baloney. As I stood talking to them the three dogs were sitting patiently next to me. At the end of that blistering windy sub-zero day my dogs climbed in the back of my warm Jimmy. Meanwhile all but one of their four or five pointing dogs had been crammed into cold aluminum boxes. Sorry, if someone did that to me I wouldn't work very well. Those guys read too many magazines and watched too many videos. Their dogs might work well (I didn't see them in action) but those fellas don't have a clue about what a hunter with a dog is really supposed to get out of being in the field together. Birds? Pffft! Those things are just a smelly sack of feathers. Companionship, teamwork, love, and mutual respect. Those are the rewards that fill the heart and soul even if the bag is empty. Why stop reaping them just because you're done hunting?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Couldn't be more wrong IMO. (in my opinion) My bird dogs are my best buddies, and we hunt together as a working team. Each one has to have a vocabulary of 50 words, or more because they live in the house around me, communicate a great deal with me, and learn commands everyday living with me. Hunting season is short. My great relationship with my dogs lasts all year long. Having just a kenneled dog using it for a short period of time each year says something about the personality of the owner IMO. I say, "lets go get the mail." and they walk down to the end of the street, heal, waiting for cars to go by, and then the command to cross. People drive by staring at my dogs healing. And when I shower in the morning, they smell the pants I put on, and know whether we are going hunting, or not. And it takes a lot of money spent training your dog professionally if you only have a kenneled dog to perform as well in the field as myself, and my dog...just don't factor in my bad shooting lately! And mine ride well in the back of my SUV in comfort out to the hunting site.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dcast wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I recently became a member of a hunt club and became friends with several guys there that have various types of dogs some retrievers, pointers, etc... and all of them a hunting dogs and all are treated as if family members or best friends. The dogs know when they are to hunt and when to be a friend. Dogs know when to work and not too, they have been breeded for centuries to hunt and it is in them to do so naturally and the willingly do it. They are also very affectionate even though being hunters they strive to please their master. So I don't think it is an issue, but that is up for debate. I know plenty with both points of view. The key is teaching them when to work and when to play.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Lots of guys that own hunting dogs spend money having them trained, have them kenelled all year long, and it is in large part an ego thing. They brag to their buddies what an incredible dog they have, papered with all kinds of credentials/pedigree, and they mainly want to be a blowhard around their buddies. Mine, are first and foremost, my best friends, and that is why I have no qualms about telling folks my older, Black Lab is a mutt! And an incredible mutt in the field!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I could give you a lenghty answer with numerous reasons why this is not true, but to make it short- Bull S***.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Safado wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Ontario Honker,
It warms my heart to read your thoughts about your dog. I have a great dog, he's not a hunter but he is definitely one of my best friends. I take him when I run errands and when I come back to the car he is always sitting behind the wheel in the driver's seat waiting for me to return.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Clinchknot, I have never had any of the problems that you have brought up and I have been raising dogs in my home for almost fifty years. Wait a minute ... what are the problems that you "presented" anyway. I can't seem to find any. Ummm ... let's see. Ah, I see ... your dog wants to listen to your wife instead of you. Wellll ... Okay, maybe I better not go there. :-)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Glad someone bit at the bait. The "flip side" to my calculation is that a duck could just as easily have landed in the middle of the long side of a fifty acre parcel which would be 1,100 yards from the edge.* Yikes. That would be one slow drift to the ground with a broken wing! Greenheads packing parachutes these days? Without a database of various measured wounded duck drops, randomness can be crudely taken into consideration by simply averaging the two calculations. The average duck drop into the "middle" of a fifty acre parcel would therefore be 55 yards + 1,100 yards divided by 2 = 577.5 yards. Old Pearl is pretty good at retrieving geese from the worst kind of stuff and at incredible distances ... but six hundred yards? Gee, this was fun. We should have more of this kind of thing on here.

* A 10 acre row (long side of the parcel) x 660 feet/acre (the long side of an acre) divided by 2 (the center) = 3,300 feet = 1,100 yards

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from redfishunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

from my experience, most people who keep there dogs strictly as working dogs rather than pets do so for emotional reasons. A lot of things can happen to a hunting dog, and it's tough on the master.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Dcast, the key to training your dog is to make the work be play. A lot of guys forget that when they're training their dogs. If the dog enjoys what it's doing it will always strive to do it better.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

hell no. my brittany is an excellent house dog and companion. since i was in 6th grade that dog has slept on the end of my bed. when i go out and do little errands she sits in the passenger seat next to me, i take her out to get the mail, ect. she is two different dogs i like to put it. a companion in the house, and a killing machine in the field. completely different animal when she hops out of the truck to hunt. focused and driven.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Here's the flip side to what I said, and Ontario said. A good hunting lab, for instance, is a motivated, bullheaded dog. Often times, living around the house they get away with things. Rules get broken. When you have a command, a rule with a lab you had better follow it ALL THE TIME. That lab, and especially a male lab, knows he can break rules when you don't persist in demanding they get followed! When you are not consistent. That is why some dog trainers will breakdown a strong minded male lab, and let them know in no uncertain terms who is boss, and now it is do as I command, or else, and they get the needed results. Often owners are too compassionite, and give in when the dog is a family member. It is a fine line you live if you want a good hunting dog that always responds to command. And I can't say I always do it right. I will always follow the notion my dogs are family members. And my wife can be a problem. She will be the one that gives in, and they go to her rather than following my orders.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from redfishunter wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Also, most dogs I've hunted with that run deer, rabbits, or squirrels are strictly hunting dogs. I don't know of anyone with a retriever that isn't a pet.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Many duck retrieving labs are not pets...kept kenneled up, and go for days with no attention given.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

We all should know enough to be conservative about the table scraps. Not good for their teeth for one thing. Can also cause weight problems. Just because the dog lives in your house doesn't mean it has to eat your food.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Trapper Vic wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

If a dog is trained correctly, his instinct to hunt will always be there. Most dogs are purchased thinking they already know the rules. Train him right and let him sleep, at the end of the bed!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

"If a dog is trained correctly" That statement takes in a lot of territory, and a lot of amateurs use terrible techniuqes in performing their own amateur training methods. And it depends on what your goals are, and how well you want your dog to perform in the field. I just watched the waterfowl retrieving trials I believe they called them, and I seriously doubt there is anyone on this thread that has trained their dogs to perform even close to how those dogs performed.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

So what? I lost one pheasant this past season but came home with nine that I didn't shoot. But they'r not supposed to do that according to some definition of perfection defined by who knows. My dogs will break at the shot. Big deal! The fact that they do has saved me a lot more crippled birds than it has cost me. But it's not "good performance" according to someone's rules. Pfffft! Hunting my Britt pup with flushing dogs is supposed to ruin her. Says someone who writes articles for magazines and may or may not have experience engineering dogs to "perform" according to Hoyle. Hasn't proved to be the case.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Heck, my big black Lab knows what I am about to do before I do. He guards the truck and home, protects my wife, and is my constant companion. I don't go many places without him except to work. His sidekick, the little yellow lab pup, hasn't figured all that out yet. My dawgs sleep in the house and eat a premium brand of dog food and the occasional bite of people food, but I would never feed any of my dawgs a heavy diet of people food. Not good for them. My dawgs live a pretty petted existence, but they will hit the icy water and marshes with as much enthusiasm as a kennel dog. Big dawg made a quarter mile retrieve on a goose today that I didn't even see go down that was sailed by another hunter way down the field. He locked on and away he went. I saw him headed in a safe direction with that body language that says, "I got him, Pops!", so I didn't whistle him back. I could see something in the field and thought it might be a blowing plastic bag, but he came back with a crippled goose. He is a purebred Lab from good stock, but otherwise spoiled rotten.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

OHH,

I think Brave has grabbed more ducks than I ever shot over the years. If there is a duck in 40 acres of standing corn, he will find it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

WA MTNhunter...That's nothin. My old Black Mutt can find a duck in 50 acres of standing corn.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dh_jaxd wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

It really bothers me when some people say a working dog can't be a pet too.... Form a tight bond with that working dog by allowing him into your home and experiencing everyday life and you will have a working dog that will do anything for you, without hesitation. That said, some dogs just are not cut out to be good working dogs and that has nothing to do with being pets or being kennel dogs.... Dogs live for their owner though and thrive off of companionship. A good dog will learn so much more if you integrate him into your home and family. It will not ruin their working attitude to be a pet. My best working dogs have also been my best friends.....that tight bond between working dog and master is one of beauty and cannot be duplicated by a dog who is kenneled with little to no human interaction except at working times. Enjoy your dog.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

DH..Just remember the problems that I presented when you make a dog a family member pet. I would never have a hunting dog that isn't a member of the family, and lives indoors with me, BUT....that brings on problems that I have brought up, and dog owners should undertand them.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Hmmmm. How a duck wound up in the middle of fifty acres of standing corn would seem to me to be a mystery worth investigating. It didn't fly in there, that's for sure. I have seen some cripples drop a ways away but ... Okay, let me do the math here ... If 50 acres = 5 columns of 10 acres each, then on the short side this parcel would be five acres across with each acre being 66' x 660'. If the duck found is in the middle of the short side of the 50 acre parcel (measured on each acre's short side) and shooter was on the edge, then the quacker fell ... 66 feet x 5 columns divided by 2 or 165 feet from the shooter. That's 55 yards. Okay, I guess it's doable. How are my calculations?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

my dog doesnt get human food of any kind but other than that he has the run of the place. and he NEVER sleeps outside if i dont!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Onario..bit the bait? You are too dense. WAMtnhunter was being braggadose, and I was just heaping it on. Both of us will have to use footnotes to our post to clue you in next time.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Sounds easy enough to me without the need of a calculator. Duck angles down having been hit, and crashes and burns in a 50 acre section of standing corn. If we could get an old hunting buddy of mine who now lives in Anchorage, AK on the phone he would remember the incredible mallard shooting we had with him and I hidden in the standing corn with a big irrigation ditch nearby the field. Problably my incredible calling that brought them in close circling our standing corn, but it was one fine day of duck hunting.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer