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Q:
Full body duck decoys or duck shells for hunting in field and possibly at waters edge?

Question by farmboy4240. Uploaded on October 13, 2011

Answers (3)

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 2 years 26 weeks ago

I use G&H goose shells and am very pleased (see recent photo in my profile). You can stack shells and get five times more in your bag. Good quality shells are still much, much cheaper than full-body deeks. I would advise placing each shell in a plastic bag when stacking them. Helps keep the paint from scratching off.

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from RES1956 wrote 2 years 26 weeks ago

For field hunting, I have used both with success. Regular floater decoys can be used in the field and will work fine and if your at the water's edge, you will need decoys in the water also to make it look right. Ducks will usually land in the water, then swim to the dry ground. Shells can be placed up on the corn stubble; this will make them more visible and will cast a shadow on sunny days and for some reason this works very well.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 2 years 26 weeks ago

Problem with throwing shells up on the corn stubble is any little breeze will get under em and tip em over. And nothing will turn a flock faster than a tipped over decoy. If I don't have time to stake my deeks, I'll set them right on the ground in among the stubble (usually wheat or barley). They are less visible but also less likely to turn over.

I made a couple of extensions for my stakes using pieces of plastic conduit pipe cut at a point on one end. These put the decoys well above the stubble and also allow for some motion in the wind (the stakes spin inside the the conduit tube). Like you said, RES, this helps with shadow and really raises the visibility. I should cut more tubes and raise the whole lot of my deeks to see if it makes any real difference.

Speaking of motion attractants: RES, do you use one of those waving flapper-attracter gizzmos? Never tried them (hard to use one if I'm not in a layout blind). I don't have any mojo-type decoys either. Everyone tells me they are deadly for ducks (so deadly they are banned in some jurisdictions) but geese hate them. Rarely see any ducks flying so not much point in me having anything like that.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 2 years 26 weeks ago

I use G&H goose shells and am very pleased (see recent photo in my profile). You can stack shells and get five times more in your bag. Good quality shells are still much, much cheaper than full-body deeks. I would advise placing each shell in a plastic bag when stacking them. Helps keep the paint from scratching off.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 26 weeks ago

For field hunting, I have used both with success. Regular floater decoys can be used in the field and will work fine and if your at the water's edge, you will need decoys in the water also to make it look right. Ducks will usually land in the water, then swim to the dry ground. Shells can be placed up on the corn stubble; this will make them more visible and will cast a shadow on sunny days and for some reason this works very well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 2 years 26 weeks ago

Problem with throwing shells up on the corn stubble is any little breeze will get under em and tip em over. And nothing will turn a flock faster than a tipped over decoy. If I don't have time to stake my deeks, I'll set them right on the ground in among the stubble (usually wheat or barley). They are less visible but also less likely to turn over.

I made a couple of extensions for my stakes using pieces of plastic conduit pipe cut at a point on one end. These put the decoys well above the stubble and also allow for some motion in the wind (the stakes spin inside the the conduit tube). Like you said, RES, this helps with shadow and really raises the visibility. I should cut more tubes and raise the whole lot of my deeks to see if it makes any real difference.

Speaking of motion attractants: RES, do you use one of those waving flapper-attracter gizzmos? Never tried them (hard to use one if I'm not in a layout blind). I don't have any mojo-type decoys either. Everyone tells me they are deadly for ducks (so deadly they are banned in some jurisdictions) but geese hate them. Rarely see any ducks flying so not much point in me having anything like that.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

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