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Q:
I am looking for a good pair of waders for duck hunting. Should i get neoprene, if so, what thickness. Should i get stockingfoot or a boot foot. Whick Would be warmer. What kind of socks and undergarments should i wear under them.

Question by stikbow. Uploaded on November 16, 2011

Answers (5)

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I field hunt mostly so can't speak with authority on this matter. However, I spent a lot of time (virtually daily) fly fishing glacial fed river in Alaska when I worked in Katmai National Park a few years ago. My Orvis Silver Medal breathable stocking foot waders worked fine. I wore long-johns, blue jeans, and wool pants underneath them. Stocking foot and wading boots worked fine for those conditions but I suppose if you're putting deeks out in mucky situations you might want boot foot (wading boots might get pulled off?). If you're blind hunting camo is not really necessary. My waders are a tan color which would be fine in any event.

Neoprene makes me sweat. I have a camo pair of neoprene gloves that my late wife gave me for Chirstmas a few years ago. They are about the most useless covering I have for my hands. My hands sweat up almost immediately and then there's just no way to keep them warm after that. Neoprene waders also tend to want to float away when stepping over logs etc. in river current. Breathable waders are like wading with nothing on. I have had my waders since 2004 and no leaks yet. And I have worked them hard.

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from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I'm no wader expert but have used them for duck hunting for many years. I like the boots for wading in the muck. I can put on any amount of stockings for a tight fit. You need to be able to pull your boot up out of the mud when you sink in and that happens a lot. I like the thick rubbery waders so they don't tear on broken sticks and rushes. I've crawled over lots of trash getting to the blind and chasing cripples and you never want to get a leak... they have to be tough above all else. I wear long johns and jeans under mine. If the temp is around 10 degrees or less, I add thermals too.

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from Greenhead wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I could have sworn I answered this question this morning, but apparently it didn't go through.

Neoprene waders are warmer than any other material. Breathables are nice in milder temps, or if you will be moving around a lot, but for spending any time in the water, you can't beat thick neoprene. I only wear breathables when it is downright warm.

Stocking foot is more comfortable and gives you better ankle support, but boot foot is much warmer. I have a pair of 3mm stocking foot that I use for fishing colder streams and hunting the early season, before the weather gets too bad. Once there is a little frost on the pumpkin, I switch to my 5mm heavily insulated boot foot waders, and they do keep me warm, even on those days when you have to bust ice to put out our decoys.

Under my waders, I wear one pair of the thickest wool socks I can find. Spend a little money on them, they will last for years. For my legs, I wear long johns and fleece pants that I think are designed to be fashionable for a more urban crowd. Regardless, they are warm. I really like the idea of those fleece pants with the loops to hook on your foot, but I have a hard time replacing what works.

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from Goose wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

Roger's sporting goods has Columbia 5mm neopreme waters for $130(normally $250). They are warm and work great. Also they ship free.

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from JamesD wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

Wet feet=cold feet leaving you with only two options; NO.1 Do the manly thing, cowboy up and survive the day cold, wet and wiser. NO.2 Whine to your buddies that you're cold, wet and want to go home. (Don't be that guy.) All joking aside I agree with the other guys A good pair of 5mm boot foot neoprene waders are best suited for waterfowl hunting. Just as important is what you wear underneath. A good pair of long irons and wool socks are a must as wool can keep you warm even when it gets wet. Fleece pants are a good idea or a good pair of sweat pants work well. Waterfowl hunting can be very rugged and summer fishing waders aren't always up to the job (see options 1 and 2). I should also mention that maintaining your waders is very important. Keeping them dry and stored properly is very important and even the best waders can get a hole in them it just happens. A good patch kit is also important as you can repair them if needed while getting your gear ready for the season. Don't wait until your in the water to find out you have a hole in your waders I think we covered that. Good Hunting.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I field hunt mostly so can't speak with authority on this matter. However, I spent a lot of time (virtually daily) fly fishing glacial fed river in Alaska when I worked in Katmai National Park a few years ago. My Orvis Silver Medal breathable stocking foot waders worked fine. I wore long-johns, blue jeans, and wool pants underneath them. Stocking foot and wading boots worked fine for those conditions but I suppose if you're putting deeks out in mucky situations you might want boot foot (wading boots might get pulled off?). If you're blind hunting camo is not really necessary. My waders are a tan color which would be fine in any event.

Neoprene makes me sweat. I have a camo pair of neoprene gloves that my late wife gave me for Chirstmas a few years ago. They are about the most useless covering I have for my hands. My hands sweat up almost immediately and then there's just no way to keep them warm after that. Neoprene waders also tend to want to float away when stepping over logs etc. in river current. Breathable waders are like wading with nothing on. I have had my waders since 2004 and no leaks yet. And I have worked them hard.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I'm no wader expert but have used them for duck hunting for many years. I like the boots for wading in the muck. I can put on any amount of stockings for a tight fit. You need to be able to pull your boot up out of the mud when you sink in and that happens a lot. I like the thick rubbery waders so they don't tear on broken sticks and rushes. I've crawled over lots of trash getting to the blind and chasing cripples and you never want to get a leak... they have to be tough above all else. I wear long johns and jeans under mine. If the temp is around 10 degrees or less, I add thermals too.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Greenhead wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I could have sworn I answered this question this morning, but apparently it didn't go through.

Neoprene waders are warmer than any other material. Breathables are nice in milder temps, or if you will be moving around a lot, but for spending any time in the water, you can't beat thick neoprene. I only wear breathables when it is downright warm.

Stocking foot is more comfortable and gives you better ankle support, but boot foot is much warmer. I have a pair of 3mm stocking foot that I use for fishing colder streams and hunting the early season, before the weather gets too bad. Once there is a little frost on the pumpkin, I switch to my 5mm heavily insulated boot foot waders, and they do keep me warm, even on those days when you have to bust ice to put out our decoys.

Under my waders, I wear one pair of the thickest wool socks I can find. Spend a little money on them, they will last for years. For my legs, I wear long johns and fleece pants that I think are designed to be fashionable for a more urban crowd. Regardless, they are warm. I really like the idea of those fleece pants with the loops to hook on your foot, but I have a hard time replacing what works.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Goose wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

Roger's sporting goods has Columbia 5mm neopreme waters for $130(normally $250). They are warm and work great. Also they ship free.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JamesD wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

Wet feet=cold feet leaving you with only two options; NO.1 Do the manly thing, cowboy up and survive the day cold, wet and wiser. NO.2 Whine to your buddies that you're cold, wet and want to go home. (Don't be that guy.) All joking aside I agree with the other guys A good pair of 5mm boot foot neoprene waders are best suited for waterfowl hunting. Just as important is what you wear underneath. A good pair of long irons and wool socks are a must as wool can keep you warm even when it gets wet. Fleece pants are a good idea or a good pair of sweat pants work well. Waterfowl hunting can be very rugged and summer fishing waders aren't always up to the job (see options 1 and 2). I should also mention that maintaining your waders is very important. Keeping them dry and stored properly is very important and even the best waders can get a hole in them it just happens. A good patch kit is also important as you can repair them if needed while getting your gear ready for the season. Don't wait until your in the water to find out you have a hole in your waders I think we covered that. Good Hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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