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Q:
I am interested in buying a recurve bow but i have no idea what to look for, or what to expect, any words of wisdom would be appreciated. thanks.

Question by fishy man. Uploaded on October 22, 2012

Answers (6)

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from buckhunter wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

A person could write a book on what to look for when purchasing a recurve. I will keep it simple and hit only the major points.

Recurve bows come in different shapes and sizes. Find one which is comfortable to pull at your draw length. I find a 50# recurve is very satisfactory for killing deer.
The worse mistake a new archer can make is purchasing a bow which is too heavy to draw. You will never learn proper form and shoot accurately if you are fighting with a heavy bow. Most the guys I know shoot between 45-50 pounds.

Make sure the bow is properly tuned, tiller, noc height and brace height should all work together for good arrow flight.

I shoot a 60in bow, 53lbs at 28 inches with a very light arrow. @400 total grains.

If you are purchasing used, make sure the limbs are straight and there are no stress cracks in the limbs.

Once you get your bow, let me know. I will help you get it tuned.

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from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

Love me a recurve!
In all actuality, you already have the skills necessary to shoot a recurve/longbow. It's called "instinct" shooting". The hardest part is disengaging your brain and allowing "instinct" to take over. Watch Byron Ferguson amd Fred Eichler!

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from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

Love me a recurve!
In all actuality, you already have the skills necessary to shoot a recurve/longbow. It's called "instinct" shooting". The hardest part is disengaging your brain and allowing "instinct" to take over. Watch Byron Ferguson amd Fred Eichler!

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from mike0714 wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

check and make sure the limbs are straight and have no chips or cracks. check straightness by unstringing and looking down the length of the bow with the grip facing the sky if there is a twist or bulge then don't buy.

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from Gilltheman wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Keep it simple. If you have not felt a recurve, first be ready for real weight when there is no let off. Check local pawn shops for old cheap bows, remember old bows were the once the newest thing out and they will still kill.

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from bigbuck123 wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

I just bought a browning recurve/compound bow and i enjoy shooting that better than just a recurve because of let off in cold weather. I would look into those first because they look at feel and perform like a traditional recurve.

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from buckhunter wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

A person could write a book on what to look for when purchasing a recurve. I will keep it simple and hit only the major points.

Recurve bows come in different shapes and sizes. Find one which is comfortable to pull at your draw length. I find a 50# recurve is very satisfactory for killing deer.
The worse mistake a new archer can make is purchasing a bow which is too heavy to draw. You will never learn proper form and shoot accurately if you are fighting with a heavy bow. Most the guys I know shoot between 45-50 pounds.

Make sure the bow is properly tuned, tiller, noc height and brace height should all work together for good arrow flight.

I shoot a 60in bow, 53lbs at 28 inches with a very light arrow. @400 total grains.

If you are purchasing used, make sure the limbs are straight and there are no stress cracks in the limbs.

Once you get your bow, let me know. I will help you get it tuned.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

Love me a recurve!
In all actuality, you already have the skills necessary to shoot a recurve/longbow. It's called "instinct" shooting". The hardest part is disengaging your brain and allowing "instinct" to take over. Watch Byron Ferguson amd Fred Eichler!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

Love me a recurve!
In all actuality, you already have the skills necessary to shoot a recurve/longbow. It's called "instinct" shooting". The hardest part is disengaging your brain and allowing "instinct" to take over. Watch Byron Ferguson amd Fred Eichler!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mike0714 wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

check and make sure the limbs are straight and have no chips or cracks. check straightness by unstringing and looking down the length of the bow with the grip facing the sky if there is a twist or bulge then don't buy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gilltheman wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Keep it simple. If you have not felt a recurve, first be ready for real weight when there is no let off. Check local pawn shops for old cheap bows, remember old bows were the once the newest thing out and they will still kill.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bigbuck123 wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

I just bought a browning recurve/compound bow and i enjoy shooting that better than just a recurve because of let off in cold weather. I would look into those first because they look at feel and perform like a traditional recurve.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

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