Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

AnswersASK YOUR QUESTION

Answers

Q:
What is the effective range of a 30-06, i hunt both woodland and clear cut's. I have been told that 30-06 is all you need for deer hunting, but i am having doubts that it will be able to travel flat enough.

Question by Slang. Uploaded on July 24, 2012

Answers (20)

Top Rated
All Answers
from BippityBoopityMate wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I wouldn't shoot much over the 200 range. it also depends on your bullet weight. the lighter the bullet, the flatter it shoots, the less knock down power, and vise versa.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Learn to shoot "your" gun and it will kill deer further than you need to be shooting them! I don't think I'd suggest any 1,000 yard shots, but the round is capable.
Remember, snipers "love" the 7.62 NATO (.308 Winchester) and have used it to make 1,000 yard shots. It's nothing but an '06 "short"!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

how far are you looking to shoot?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Your limitations are what limits the cartridge!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hawndog wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

How far can you see a deer?
The 30-06 is one of the flattest shooting rifles available. check out the ballistics table at hornady.com

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Don't lose sleep on this one. The 06 will kill deer as close, or as far away as you have any business shooting at one.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

The 06, even though I am not of fan of it, will kill a deer and shoot as far as you need to shoot at a deer, unless you are talking about 5,6,or 7 hundred yard shots which the average hunter shouldn't be taking with the off of the shelf hunting rifle.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

The 150 grain bullet delivers over 1,000 ft/lbs of energy out to 400 yards, which is beyond the shooting capability of most hunters.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from LeVan Goodey wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

The effective range of a 30-06 is as far as you can accurately shoot it. Carlos Hathcock used his to shoot over 1700 yards. Wayne van woll says thet an -06 can kill elk all day at 500 yards if the shooter can hit them in a lethal spot. After my Dad got out of the army when WWII was over he used the Springfield that he was mustered out with to shoot a deer at over 700 yards,the battle sights were up as far as they would go-600 yards and he aimed a little higher. The only shot of that distance that he ever admitted to have taken. Short version, the 06 will kill deer, elk, moose and so one farther than most people should be shooting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

How did the .30-06 become a slouch in todays gun conversations. Is it the fact that we are bombarded with all the short magnums that the ammo and gun manufactures are now pushing? If anything, I would be looking at cartridges with lower recoil if its a dedicated deer rifle.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Don't be looking for a lighweight 30-06 rifle. Learn to carry a mid-weight gun properly with a good sling and you'll do okay. Seems most guys on here shoot out of a tree stand or blind so I really can't see what all the fluff is about gun weight anyway. I'm one of the few (if not the only?) trackers on here and I did very well for thirty-five years lugging around a sporterized Springfield that was anything but lightweight. I eventually did switch to a 760 Remington pump. It is lighter and shorter, uses a clip (the regulations up here make that very handy), and the gun has sentimental attachment (grandad bought it for my dad when I was born).

Your deer hunting range with that caliber will be 200 yards or less. Stretch it to 250 if you're very careful and ideal conditions. I don't think anyone has any business shooting at anything (except maybe varmints) at ranges further than that ... with ANY gun or caliber.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

The .30-'06 will perform admirably at distances I wouldn't dream of taking the shot. It is the standard to which other cartridges are compared. We were required to qualify at 200, 300 and 500 yards with the .30-'06 (M1) and 7.62 NATO (M14) and did it handily with these cartridges using the aperture sights with which they're equipped. I've never taken a shot at deer at those distances. In the recent past, I seem to find greater emphasis on long-distance shots. With the exception of varmints, I rarely see game at 200+ in the Northwest because of the vegetation in Oregon. When I lived in New York, the Adirondack and Catskill Mountains were equally rare to provide long shots. I've lived and hunted elsewhere, but never needed anything more than a .30-'06 and often went afield with less (.30-30, .250 Savage, etc.).
Briefly, I've never seen game at a distance that the .30-'06 couldn't effectively reach and dispatch, but I've seen deer at distances my tired eyes could only observe and appreciate. Your challenge with the .30-'06 isn't how far it can decisively drop game, it's how well you can shoot it to accomplish the job. It's not unique in this respect; I could say the same about the .280 Rem, and others but, as a non-magnum cartridge, it is a thoroughly respectable performer.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Josh Giannino wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

.30-06 will do quite a distance for deer, but i wouldnt suggest trying farther then 300 yards ( or your shooting ability)for instance I CAN make 250 yard shots and kill a deer with a 45-70 gov't, But I CHOOSE to not do it because a bullet htat big shouldnt be shooting that far out

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Josh Giannino wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

.30-06 will do quite a distance for deer, but i wouldnt suggest trying farther then 300 yards ( or your shooting ability)for instance I CAN make 250 yard shots and kill a deer with a 45-70 gov't, But I CHOOSE to not do it because a bullet that big shouldnt be shooting that far out

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tyler Marr wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I have used 243, 308, and 30-06 for deer, I keep going back to the 30-06, with the right quality optics and quality ammunition you should be able to shoot at comfortably over 200yards given your shooting ability. I have a Remington 700, with a Leopold scope, and I shoot Winchester Power max bonded ammunition. I hunt in the timber and pasture, The 30-06 should be able to handle what you want to do with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

The 30-06 cartridge has the speed and energy to deck a deer at 600 yards but the limitations will be the accuracy of you the shooter, the scope and the rifle. Most over-the-counter rifles don't shoot accurately enough to be taking those shots and most hunters don't shoot well enough to be shooting beyond about 150 yards.

With a very good scope, a very good rifle, lots of load tuning and a few thousand rounds of practice, you could begin to test the capability of the 30-06 in long range deer shooting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from B.R. Deneen wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I have to assume that your concern over the flatness of the round's trajectory is related to point-blank range. Since you are hunting both woodland, and clear-cut, you would be well served by a weapon that excels both at moderate ranges, and up close. The .30-06 fits that description nicely. Point-blank range (the distance over which a rifle, or other weapon may be fired without the projectile deviating outside the vital area of the target along the line of sight) for the '06 is roughly 300 yards using 150 to 170 grain bullets, and a 25 yard base zero with 1.5" sight height. Check your zero at longer ranges (200-300 yards) to verify. If you will be shooting further than around 200 yards, the use of spitzer (pointed) bullets is advised for energy retention. These bullets will need to expand somewhat before they will transfer significant energy into the target, so the ballistic advantage comes with a cost. If you are hunting at under 200 yards, nothing strikes like a round-nose or flat-nose bullet, both of which will transfer massive kinetic energy from the point of impact, through. Most newer rifles are more than capable of fine accuracy, and long range shots on big game. You are responsible for testing and recognizing your own limitations in marksmanship and equipment, and taking only clear, clean shots within your ability. I personally prefer a greater margin of error than thirty calibers tend to offer, and I will never hunt big game with anything smaller than that. I have guided allot of friends and fellow soldiers on whitetail hunts on my family's property in the driftless region of Wisconsin. I have used many different calibers, action types, and sighting systems. I have helped guests track deer over a mile or more that were hit hard, and by all rights should have hit the dirt within a hundred yards. Most of those animals were shot with .270's and .30-06's (over 90% of the time, these cartridges work flawlessly), using conventional soft-point spitzer style bullets. I have also seen large deer dropped by a single well placed 5.56 NATO round. After a couple of decades of deer hunting, I have continued to gravitate back to the first rifle I ever bought. I have seen no other rifle so reliably and cleanly take deer of all sizes (without massive tissue/meat damage). The rifle is a match-barreled Whitworth Mauser chambered in .375 H&H, and topped with a 2-7X optic. I bought the rifle at the age of fourteen after exhaustive literary research as to the favorites of those who had come before me (the .375 kept coming up as the ideal all-around big game round). I have been poked fun at by every other hunter I've discussed this with, but never heard any criticism from one who's witnessed the weapon in action. Your question is one that should be asked by more hunters, and seriously considered. I am not a stickler for the perfect shot, and hunt in an area overrun with deer, and no season limit. I prefer to hunt with a weapon that can cleanly kill with any solid hit, so I don't spend deer season watching deer instead of cutting, wrapping, and freezing. Whatever you decide to take to the woods, make sure it works for you. No chambering can make up for lack of proficiency, so take your practice at the range and with dry-fire seriously. Shoot like you do in the field, and learn the British method for offhand shooting. If you still aren't sure about the power and accuracy of the '06, try one on a few gallon jugs of water at the distances you think you'll be hunting. This exercise should eliminate any concerns you have, and demonstrate the hydrostatic aspect of the terminal performance of the bullets you select.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kvanconant wrote 1 year 21 weeks ago

I dropped a 130 lb doe at 415 yds with my 1977 Savage 110 30-06. She didn't take a single step when she was hit.
150 grain soft tip hand reloaded round with 56 gr power in it.
I have a Bushnell 4x12x40 XLT Trophy with 600 yd DOA BDC on it.
I would have to say I could take a 500+ yd shot and be confident the bullet is going exactly where I want it too. My gun is all original as well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michael Sicowitz wrote 30 weeks 3 days ago

Unfortunately, I spend my best years shooting a 30-30. Sure, I got a few, but I knew the limits of my weapon and had to pass on some 'once in a lifetime' bucks. Here in Wisconsin we have a bit of everything for cover. When younger I had the legs so did a lot of mini driving with a few others. Guys with an 06 would cover the road while I battled the brush. Thing is, I got so good with that 30-30 I hung on to it till I was nearly 50yrs. I'd never even shot a deer with a scope. All that changed when I had to change my hunting style. I bought myself a Tikka 30-06 for my 50th birthday and it was like being a kid again. First, at the range getting used to a scope was a challenge, but worth every second and shell. My first time out I had so much confidence I knew I'd get one. Sure enough, no worries about range, take about a 50yd shot through brush-using 180gr cores, down it goes. One little kick then dead and quick. From my time at the range I know that shot could have been 150yds farther with the same result. In short, it's not the range of the 06, more like the time at the range, a good scope, and don't skimp on mounts. Fill her up with 180s and shoot from under 50 out to over 200 without having to lift. Now if you want to shoot beyond 200yds maybe you want a 300 mag. But you wanted to know if she's flat: she's plenty flat, and I'm just getting started. I only wish I'd done it sooner. Now I'm a stand, and a good one. Combine 30yrs of marching around the woods learning deer with time at the range learning how to quickly put on the crosshairs and everyone goes home with venison. The 06 is a legend around here, so is the 30-30, both have their place. A century of doing this with success says something. For one, if the 06 wasn't a flat shooter, we would use a different round (270), but that 180 goes through about anything. To conclude, Wisconsin has some big ones and lots of brush. Those guys marching through that deserve some meat for their work. Rarely is a shot more than 200 because if it is, and you know what you are doing, another stand will have the closer shot. There are flatter guns, sure, but you can get shells about anywhere, they don't cost a fortune, and put them down from a long way, without having to lift, worry about wind, nothing. You do your part at the range and the 06 will do it in the field.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michael Sicowitz wrote 30 weeks 3 days ago

Unfortunately, I spent my best years shooting a 30-30. Sure, I got a few, but I knew the limits of my weapon and had to pass on some 'once in a lifetime' bucks. Here in Wisconsin we have a bit of everything for cover. When younger I had the legs so did a lot of mini driving with a few others. Guys with an 06 would cover the road while I battled the brush. Thing is, I got so good with that 30-30 I hung on to it till I was nearly 50yrs. I'd never even shot a deer with a scope. All that changed when I had to change my hunting style. I bought myself a Tikka 30-06 for my 50th birthday and it was like being a kid again. First, at the range getting used to a scope was a challenge, but worth every second and shell. My first time out I had so much confidence I knew I'd get one. Sure enough, no worries about range, take about a 50yd shot through brush-using 180gr cores, down it goes. One little kick then dead and quick. From my time at the range I know that shot could have been 150yds farther with the same result. In short, it's not the range of the 06, more like the time at the range, a good scope, and don't skimp on mounts. Fill her up with 180s and shoot from under 50 out to over 200 without having to lift. Now if you want to shoot beyond 200yds maybe you want a 300 mag. But you wanted to know if she's flat: she's plenty flat, and I'm just getting started. I only wish I'd done it sooner. Now I'm a stand, and a good one. Combine 30yrs of marching around the woods learning deer with time at the range learning how to quickly put on the crosshairs and everyone goes home with venison. The 06 is a legend around here, so is the 30-30, both have their place. A century of doing this with success says something. For one, if the 06 wasn't a flat shooter, we would use a different round (270), but that 180 goes through about anything. To conclude, Wisconsin has some big ones and lots of brush. Those guys marching through that deserve some meat for their work. Rarely is a shot more than 200 because if it is, and you know what you are doing, another stand will have the closer shot. There are flatter guns, sure, but you can get shells about anywhere, they don't cost a fortune, and put them down from a long way, without having to lift, worry about wind, nothing. You do your part at the range and the 06 will do it in the field.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Don't lose sleep on this one. The 06 will kill deer as close, or as far away as you have any business shooting at one.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

The 06, even though I am not of fan of it, will kill a deer and shoot as far as you need to shoot at a deer, unless you are talking about 5,6,or 7 hundred yard shots which the average hunter shouldn't be taking with the off of the shelf hunting rifle.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Learn to shoot "your" gun and it will kill deer further than you need to be shooting them! I don't think I'd suggest any 1,000 yard shots, but the round is capable.
Remember, snipers "love" the 7.62 NATO (.308 Winchester) and have used it to make 1,000 yard shots. It's nothing but an '06 "short"!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Your limitations are what limits the cartridge!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from LeVan Goodey wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

The effective range of a 30-06 is as far as you can accurately shoot it. Carlos Hathcock used his to shoot over 1700 yards. Wayne van woll says thet an -06 can kill elk all day at 500 yards if the shooter can hit them in a lethal spot. After my Dad got out of the army when WWII was over he used the Springfield that he was mustered out with to shoot a deer at over 700 yards,the battle sights were up as far as they would go-600 yards and he aimed a little higher. The only shot of that distance that he ever admitted to have taken. Short version, the 06 will kill deer, elk, moose and so one farther than most people should be shooting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

How did the .30-06 become a slouch in todays gun conversations. Is it the fact that we are bombarded with all the short magnums that the ammo and gun manufactures are now pushing? If anything, I would be looking at cartridges with lower recoil if its a dedicated deer rifle.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

The .30-'06 will perform admirably at distances I wouldn't dream of taking the shot. It is the standard to which other cartridges are compared. We were required to qualify at 200, 300 and 500 yards with the .30-'06 (M1) and 7.62 NATO (M14) and did it handily with these cartridges using the aperture sights with which they're equipped. I've never taken a shot at deer at those distances. In the recent past, I seem to find greater emphasis on long-distance shots. With the exception of varmints, I rarely see game at 200+ in the Northwest because of the vegetation in Oregon. When I lived in New York, the Adirondack and Catskill Mountains were equally rare to provide long shots. I've lived and hunted elsewhere, but never needed anything more than a .30-'06 and often went afield with less (.30-30, .250 Savage, etc.).
Briefly, I've never seen game at a distance that the .30-'06 couldn't effectively reach and dispatch, but I've seen deer at distances my tired eyes could only observe and appreciate. Your challenge with the .30-'06 isn't how far it can decisively drop game, it's how well you can shoot it to accomplish the job. It's not unique in this respect; I could say the same about the .280 Rem, and others but, as a non-magnum cartridge, it is a thoroughly respectable performer.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

how far are you looking to shoot?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hawndog wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

How far can you see a deer?
The 30-06 is one of the flattest shooting rifles available. check out the ballistics table at hornady.com

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

The 150 grain bullet delivers over 1,000 ft/lbs of energy out to 400 yards, which is beyond the shooting capability of most hunters.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Don't be looking for a lighweight 30-06 rifle. Learn to carry a mid-weight gun properly with a good sling and you'll do okay. Seems most guys on here shoot out of a tree stand or blind so I really can't see what all the fluff is about gun weight anyway. I'm one of the few (if not the only?) trackers on here and I did very well for thirty-five years lugging around a sporterized Springfield that was anything but lightweight. I eventually did switch to a 760 Remington pump. It is lighter and shorter, uses a clip (the regulations up here make that very handy), and the gun has sentimental attachment (grandad bought it for my dad when I was born).

Your deer hunting range with that caliber will be 200 yards or less. Stretch it to 250 if you're very careful and ideal conditions. I don't think anyone has any business shooting at anything (except maybe varmints) at ranges further than that ... with ANY gun or caliber.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Josh Giannino wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

.30-06 will do quite a distance for deer, but i wouldnt suggest trying farther then 300 yards ( or your shooting ability)for instance I CAN make 250 yard shots and kill a deer with a 45-70 gov't, But I CHOOSE to not do it because a bullet htat big shouldnt be shooting that far out

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Josh Giannino wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

.30-06 will do quite a distance for deer, but i wouldnt suggest trying farther then 300 yards ( or your shooting ability)for instance I CAN make 250 yard shots and kill a deer with a 45-70 gov't, But I CHOOSE to not do it because a bullet that big shouldnt be shooting that far out

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tyler Marr wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I have used 243, 308, and 30-06 for deer, I keep going back to the 30-06, with the right quality optics and quality ammunition you should be able to shoot at comfortably over 200yards given your shooting ability. I have a Remington 700, with a Leopold scope, and I shoot Winchester Power max bonded ammunition. I hunt in the timber and pasture, The 30-06 should be able to handle what you want to do with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

The 30-06 cartridge has the speed and energy to deck a deer at 600 yards but the limitations will be the accuracy of you the shooter, the scope and the rifle. Most over-the-counter rifles don't shoot accurately enough to be taking those shots and most hunters don't shoot well enough to be shooting beyond about 150 yards.

With a very good scope, a very good rifle, lots of load tuning and a few thousand rounds of practice, you could begin to test the capability of the 30-06 in long range deer shooting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from B.R. Deneen wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I have to assume that your concern over the flatness of the round's trajectory is related to point-blank range. Since you are hunting both woodland, and clear-cut, you would be well served by a weapon that excels both at moderate ranges, and up close. The .30-06 fits that description nicely. Point-blank range (the distance over which a rifle, or other weapon may be fired without the projectile deviating outside the vital area of the target along the line of sight) for the '06 is roughly 300 yards using 150 to 170 grain bullets, and a 25 yard base zero with 1.5" sight height. Check your zero at longer ranges (200-300 yards) to verify. If you will be shooting further than around 200 yards, the use of spitzer (pointed) bullets is advised for energy retention. These bullets will need to expand somewhat before they will transfer significant energy into the target, so the ballistic advantage comes with a cost. If you are hunting at under 200 yards, nothing strikes like a round-nose or flat-nose bullet, both of which will transfer massive kinetic energy from the point of impact, through. Most newer rifles are more than capable of fine accuracy, and long range shots on big game. You are responsible for testing and recognizing your own limitations in marksmanship and equipment, and taking only clear, clean shots within your ability. I personally prefer a greater margin of error than thirty calibers tend to offer, and I will never hunt big game with anything smaller than that. I have guided allot of friends and fellow soldiers on whitetail hunts on my family's property in the driftless region of Wisconsin. I have used many different calibers, action types, and sighting systems. I have helped guests track deer over a mile or more that were hit hard, and by all rights should have hit the dirt within a hundred yards. Most of those animals were shot with .270's and .30-06's (over 90% of the time, these cartridges work flawlessly), using conventional soft-point spitzer style bullets. I have also seen large deer dropped by a single well placed 5.56 NATO round. After a couple of decades of deer hunting, I have continued to gravitate back to the first rifle I ever bought. I have seen no other rifle so reliably and cleanly take deer of all sizes (without massive tissue/meat damage). The rifle is a match-barreled Whitworth Mauser chambered in .375 H&H, and topped with a 2-7X optic. I bought the rifle at the age of fourteen after exhaustive literary research as to the favorites of those who had come before me (the .375 kept coming up as the ideal all-around big game round). I have been poked fun at by every other hunter I've discussed this with, but never heard any criticism from one who's witnessed the weapon in action. Your question is one that should be asked by more hunters, and seriously considered. I am not a stickler for the perfect shot, and hunt in an area overrun with deer, and no season limit. I prefer to hunt with a weapon that can cleanly kill with any solid hit, so I don't spend deer season watching deer instead of cutting, wrapping, and freezing. Whatever you decide to take to the woods, make sure it works for you. No chambering can make up for lack of proficiency, so take your practice at the range and with dry-fire seriously. Shoot like you do in the field, and learn the British method for offhand shooting. If you still aren't sure about the power and accuracy of the '06, try one on a few gallon jugs of water at the distances you think you'll be hunting. This exercise should eliminate any concerns you have, and demonstrate the hydrostatic aspect of the terminal performance of the bullets you select.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kvanconant wrote 1 year 21 weeks ago

I dropped a 130 lb doe at 415 yds with my 1977 Savage 110 30-06. She didn't take a single step when she was hit.
150 grain soft tip hand reloaded round with 56 gr power in it.
I have a Bushnell 4x12x40 XLT Trophy with 600 yd DOA BDC on it.
I would have to say I could take a 500+ yd shot and be confident the bullet is going exactly where I want it too. My gun is all original as well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michael Sicowitz wrote 30 weeks 3 days ago

Unfortunately, I spend my best years shooting a 30-30. Sure, I got a few, but I knew the limits of my weapon and had to pass on some 'once in a lifetime' bucks. Here in Wisconsin we have a bit of everything for cover. When younger I had the legs so did a lot of mini driving with a few others. Guys with an 06 would cover the road while I battled the brush. Thing is, I got so good with that 30-30 I hung on to it till I was nearly 50yrs. I'd never even shot a deer with a scope. All that changed when I had to change my hunting style. I bought myself a Tikka 30-06 for my 50th birthday and it was like being a kid again. First, at the range getting used to a scope was a challenge, but worth every second and shell. My first time out I had so much confidence I knew I'd get one. Sure enough, no worries about range, take about a 50yd shot through brush-using 180gr cores, down it goes. One little kick then dead and quick. From my time at the range I know that shot could have been 150yds farther with the same result. In short, it's not the range of the 06, more like the time at the range, a good scope, and don't skimp on mounts. Fill her up with 180s and shoot from under 50 out to over 200 without having to lift. Now if you want to shoot beyond 200yds maybe you want a 300 mag. But you wanted to know if she's flat: she's plenty flat, and I'm just getting started. I only wish I'd done it sooner. Now I'm a stand, and a good one. Combine 30yrs of marching around the woods learning deer with time at the range learning how to quickly put on the crosshairs and everyone goes home with venison. The 06 is a legend around here, so is the 30-30, both have their place. A century of doing this with success says something. For one, if the 06 wasn't a flat shooter, we would use a different round (270), but that 180 goes through about anything. To conclude, Wisconsin has some big ones and lots of brush. Those guys marching through that deserve some meat for their work. Rarely is a shot more than 200 because if it is, and you know what you are doing, another stand will have the closer shot. There are flatter guns, sure, but you can get shells about anywhere, they don't cost a fortune, and put them down from a long way, without having to lift, worry about wind, nothing. You do your part at the range and the 06 will do it in the field.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michael Sicowitz wrote 30 weeks 3 days ago

Unfortunately, I spent my best years shooting a 30-30. Sure, I got a few, but I knew the limits of my weapon and had to pass on some 'once in a lifetime' bucks. Here in Wisconsin we have a bit of everything for cover. When younger I had the legs so did a lot of mini driving with a few others. Guys with an 06 would cover the road while I battled the brush. Thing is, I got so good with that 30-30 I hung on to it till I was nearly 50yrs. I'd never even shot a deer with a scope. All that changed when I had to change my hunting style. I bought myself a Tikka 30-06 for my 50th birthday and it was like being a kid again. First, at the range getting used to a scope was a challenge, but worth every second and shell. My first time out I had so much confidence I knew I'd get one. Sure enough, no worries about range, take about a 50yd shot through brush-using 180gr cores, down it goes. One little kick then dead and quick. From my time at the range I know that shot could have been 150yds farther with the same result. In short, it's not the range of the 06, more like the time at the range, a good scope, and don't skimp on mounts. Fill her up with 180s and shoot from under 50 out to over 200 without having to lift. Now if you want to shoot beyond 200yds maybe you want a 300 mag. But you wanted to know if she's flat: she's plenty flat, and I'm just getting started. I only wish I'd done it sooner. Now I'm a stand, and a good one. Combine 30yrs of marching around the woods learning deer with time at the range learning how to quickly put on the crosshairs and everyone goes home with venison. The 06 is a legend around here, so is the 30-30, both have their place. A century of doing this with success says something. For one, if the 06 wasn't a flat shooter, we would use a different round (270), but that 180 goes through about anything. To conclude, Wisconsin has some big ones and lots of brush. Those guys marching through that deserve some meat for their work. Rarely is a shot more than 200 because if it is, and you know what you are doing, another stand will have the closer shot. There are flatter guns, sure, but you can get shells about anywhere, they don't cost a fortune, and put them down from a long way, without having to lift, worry about wind, nothing. You do your part at the range and the 06 will do it in the field.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from BippityBoopityMate wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I wouldn't shoot much over the 200 range. it also depends on your bullet weight. the lighter the bullet, the flatter it shoots, the less knock down power, and vise versa.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer