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Q:
is crushed corn or whole kernel corn better for deer

Question by Duckkiller4. Uploaded on July 25, 2011

Answers (11)

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from jay wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Crushed corn is better for dairy cattle and hogs so I don't think its a stretch to say its better for deer as well.

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from nchunt101 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

deer eat it all,,,instead of either just get a bunch of corn on the cob,,,its cheaper and it takes the deer londer to eat it. Also it requires no feeder just spread it down your shooting lane in quanity

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from Crooked_Stick wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

It would be better for the deer if you do not feed them corn.

http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0%2C1607%2C7-153-10370_12150_12220-26508--%2...
Corn toxicity is a general term related to two diseases which can affect white-tailed deer throughout Michigan and elk in the northeastern portion of the state. Both diseases occur acutely and result in the rapid death of animals in good physical condition. These diseases are acidosis (grain overload) and enterotoxemia (overeating disease).

ACIDOSIS

Acidosis occurs when ruminants gain access to large quantities of readily digestible carbohydrates, particularly grain (in Michigan usually corn is involved). Apples, sugarbeets and mangels have been found to cause acidosis in domestic ruminants. Acidosis is characterized by indigestion, rumen stasis, dehydration, diarrhea, toxemia, incoordination, and death.

A change from a natural diet of high fiber woody browse to low fiber high carbohydrate foods initiates the disease. The severity of the illness depends on the type of grain (ground or whole), previous exposure of the animal to the grain, the amount of grain consumed, the animal's nutritional state and physical condition, and the microflora present. Ingestion of toxic amounts of corn are followed within 2 to 6 hours by a change in the microbial population in the rumen. The number of gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus sp.) increase markedly (replacing the normally abundant gram-negative bacteria), thereby producing large quantities of lactic acid. This results in the rumen pH falling to or below 5, destroying protozoa, cellulolytic organisms, and lactate utilizing organisms, and reducing rumen mobility. Chemical rumenitis and absorption result in lactic acidosis. The lactic acid and lactate build-up cause excessive quantities of fluid to move into the rumen, causing dehydration.

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from iloveguns22 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

If you plan on hunting over it, I assume it's legal to bait in your state, however, I would feed whole kernal corn because it is easier to see deer activity (dimples in the corn left by deer mouths) and rain will was crushed corn away pretty quick.

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from Bioguy01 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Avoid feeding deer if at all possible...they do quite well on their own. If you want to feed them, figure out ways to promote natural food sources such as browse and forbs, and/or plant food plots.

Feeding deer can contribute to the diseases listed above by Crooked_Stick, but they can also promote the spread of diseases that are transmissible through bodily fluids.

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from Kenton wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

I dont doubt the study Crooked referred to however I would think there are some variable involved. A deer diet that is primarily grain may cause the problems the report describes but a natural diet with corn as a secondary item probably does not effect them. I base this on the huge number of deer I see in harvested corn fields day after day in the winter. There doesnt appear to be any health problems in the herd around here.

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from 007 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

I've been told by some knowledgable folks that deer seem to digest cracked corn better than shelled.

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from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Feeding deer promotes the passing of viruses and can be detrimental to the herd so trough type feeding of shelled corn or cracked corn is the least effective. If just feeding or for hunting over the bait, I would go with corn on the cob. Not only is it healthier, but that way the starlings, crows and blackbirds won't eat it all.

The study by Crooked Stick is very interesting but it appears to be targeted at deer that normally have no access to corn. In the corn belt, deer stomachs are full of corn all Fall and most of the Winter with no ill effects. There, it is a normal staple in their diet and apparently has no ill affect on their health.

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from RES1956 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Don't you get me started Bioguy,,

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from levi.m.garrett wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Depends on the application. I always used whole corn in my feeders because crack corn just spills right out. Either will work. Just use what ever is more affordable and available.

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from Bioguy01 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Lol...I see my followers are back!

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from jay wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Crushed corn is better for dairy cattle and hogs so I don't think its a stretch to say its better for deer as well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from nchunt101 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

deer eat it all,,,instead of either just get a bunch of corn on the cob,,,its cheaper and it takes the deer londer to eat it. Also it requires no feeder just spread it down your shooting lane in quanity

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from iloveguns22 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

If you plan on hunting over it, I assume it's legal to bait in your state, however, I would feed whole kernal corn because it is easier to see deer activity (dimples in the corn left by deer mouths) and rain will was crushed corn away pretty quick.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kenton wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

I dont doubt the study Crooked referred to however I would think there are some variable involved. A deer diet that is primarily grain may cause the problems the report describes but a natural diet with corn as a secondary item probably does not effect them. I base this on the huge number of deer I see in harvested corn fields day after day in the winter. There doesnt appear to be any health problems in the herd around here.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Feeding deer promotes the passing of viruses and can be detrimental to the herd so trough type feeding of shelled corn or cracked corn is the least effective. If just feeding or for hunting over the bait, I would go with corn on the cob. Not only is it healthier, but that way the starlings, crows and blackbirds won't eat it all.

The study by Crooked Stick is very interesting but it appears to be targeted at deer that normally have no access to corn. In the corn belt, deer stomachs are full of corn all Fall and most of the Winter with no ill effects. There, it is a normal staple in their diet and apparently has no ill affect on their health.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

I've been told by some knowledgable folks that deer seem to digest cracked corn better than shelled.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Don't you get me started Bioguy,,

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from levi.m.garrett wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Depends on the application. I always used whole corn in my feeders because crack corn just spills right out. Either will work. Just use what ever is more affordable and available.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Lol...I see my followers are back!

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from Crooked_Stick wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

It would be better for the deer if you do not feed them corn.

http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0%2C1607%2C7-153-10370_12150_12220-26508--%2...
Corn toxicity is a general term related to two diseases which can affect white-tailed deer throughout Michigan and elk in the northeastern portion of the state. Both diseases occur acutely and result in the rapid death of animals in good physical condition. These diseases are acidosis (grain overload) and enterotoxemia (overeating disease).

ACIDOSIS

Acidosis occurs when ruminants gain access to large quantities of readily digestible carbohydrates, particularly grain (in Michigan usually corn is involved). Apples, sugarbeets and mangels have been found to cause acidosis in domestic ruminants. Acidosis is characterized by indigestion, rumen stasis, dehydration, diarrhea, toxemia, incoordination, and death.

A change from a natural diet of high fiber woody browse to low fiber high carbohydrate foods initiates the disease. The severity of the illness depends on the type of grain (ground or whole), previous exposure of the animal to the grain, the amount of grain consumed, the animal's nutritional state and physical condition, and the microflora present. Ingestion of toxic amounts of corn are followed within 2 to 6 hours by a change in the microbial population in the rumen. The number of gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus sp.) increase markedly (replacing the normally abundant gram-negative bacteria), thereby producing large quantities of lactic acid. This results in the rumen pH falling to or below 5, destroying protozoa, cellulolytic organisms, and lactate utilizing organisms, and reducing rumen mobility. Chemical rumenitis and absorption result in lactic acidosis. The lactic acid and lactate build-up cause excessive quantities of fluid to move into the rumen, causing dehydration.

-9 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 2 years 38 weeks ago

Avoid feeding deer if at all possible...they do quite well on their own. If you want to feed them, figure out ways to promote natural food sources such as browse and forbs, and/or plant food plots.

Feeding deer can contribute to the diseases listed above by Crooked_Stick, but they can also promote the spread of diseases that are transmissible through bodily fluids.

-9 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer