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Q:
Some questions about hunting wild pigs. Is a 40 S&W adequate? Are pigs shot in the spring "better" than ones shot in other seasons? what is the best way to process the meat. Thanks.

Question by LeVan Goodey. Uploaded on October 12, 2010

Answers (13)

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from TJ wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

I haven't noticed a difference in time of year shot, generally the smaller they are the better they eat. Cut out the loin meat aka backstraps and turn the rest into sausage. If you want to use the 40 then get close and use a very tough bullet. If you can get a small enough one they are excellent on a rotissere over your grill.

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from J4huntfish wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

maybe with super heavy loads. i know the .40 has more knockdown power than a .45 because of the higher pressure good luck. if you have a .30/30 thats a great hog gun

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from shane wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

I wouldn't bet on a .40 S&W. Watched Sweaty Teddy (Uncle Ted, The Nuge) arrow a medium sized boar thrice, then emptied his 10mm on it. Barely managed to drop it a yard or two in front of him. That was fairly entertaining, to say the least. Anyways, a 10mm is the same caliber but more powerful. The 10mm fans call the .40 S&W the .40 Short & Weak if that tells you anything.

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from TJ wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

Then .40 has plenty of energy for the task, but it's bullets are not designed for deep penetration on thick skinned animals, thats why I suggested using the toughest bullet you could find. Remember shot placement is always the most important factor.

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from LeVan Goodey wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

Thanks guys. I appreciate the information. We have a year around pig season in parts of New Mexico and personally I would use my 30-06.

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from Sourdough Dave wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

The shoulders of a wild pig are armor plated with layers of grissel under the skin. My buddy was charged by one and shot it with his .357 mag four times with no penetration. When it was just feet from him he was able to put one down through the spine between the shoulders. Your .40 S&W is a fine anti-personnel round, but a markedly under powered anti-pig round. .41 mag is the minimum. .44 mag or larger would be better.

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from sgaredneck wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

Sourdough and Shane are both right. Use enough gun.

NM, use the .40 for personal defense, that's it's raison d'etre.

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from Treestand wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

NM,I hunt hogs a lot here in Fl. I use a Marlin 1894
sp in 44Mag and a 41Mag Ruger flat/top side arm, bullit placsment is every thing, most hog hunters here use a 12ga pump gun, Sourdough Dave and SGredneck have it right.

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from shane wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Just about any auto pistol round is the weak sauce for hunting big game. Even the .45 ACP. They all, .45 included, have tiny energy figures. There is some kind of strange legend that handguns in general are much more powerful than they are. They are just about all pea shooters, even compared to a .223.

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from 99explorer wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

shane is spot on. In fact, no handgun cartridge is really adequate for hunting feral hogs.
NM, your choice of the .30/06 is very wise. Good luck.

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from cmikles1 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

I think you guys are forgetting the S&W 500 magnum.

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from cmikles1 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Allow me to qualify that. The 500 is good for hogs, but I agree a 30/30 or 30'06 will do good without the cost of buying the big bullets and the big pistol that shoots them. But if the sky is the limit, why not nab yourself a Big Horn Armory Model 89 Carbine and enjoy the high life.

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from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

If you are hunting the big Russian boars I highly recommend you use something with more knockdown power than the .40 S&W. If the hog goes over 300 pounds and is attacking you, that will be like hitting it with a fly swatter. It will just make it very angry and even more aggressive. If you are in a tree stand, it can be used and a shot under the ear or through the heart will stop it. It is too dangerous to depend on the .40 if you arfe hunting on tghe ground. You will NEVER penetrate in a frontal chest shot. As a matter of fact, you will be able to see your bullets sticking out of the hide quite well as they won't penetrate more than about a quarter inch. If you hunt with the .40, be sure to have your organ donor card properly filled out.

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from Sourdough Dave wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

The shoulders of a wild pig are armor plated with layers of grissel under the skin. My buddy was charged by one and shot it with his .357 mag four times with no penetration. When it was just feet from him he was able to put one down through the spine between the shoulders. Your .40 S&W is a fine anti-personnel round, but a markedly under powered anti-pig round. .41 mag is the minimum. .44 mag or larger would be better.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

I wouldn't bet on a .40 S&W. Watched Sweaty Teddy (Uncle Ted, The Nuge) arrow a medium sized boar thrice, then emptied his 10mm on it. Barely managed to drop it a yard or two in front of him. That was fairly entertaining, to say the least. Anyways, a 10mm is the same caliber but more powerful. The 10mm fans call the .40 S&W the .40 Short & Weak if that tells you anything.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from LeVan Goodey wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

Thanks guys. I appreciate the information. We have a year around pig season in parts of New Mexico and personally I would use my 30-06.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sgaredneck wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

Sourdough and Shane are both right. Use enough gun.

NM, use the .40 for personal defense, that's it's raison d'etre.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

NM,I hunt hogs a lot here in Fl. I use a Marlin 1894
sp in 44Mag and a 41Mag Ruger flat/top side arm, bullit placsment is every thing, most hog hunters here use a 12ga pump gun, Sourdough Dave and SGredneck have it right.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

If you are hunting the big Russian boars I highly recommend you use something with more knockdown power than the .40 S&W. If the hog goes over 300 pounds and is attacking you, that will be like hitting it with a fly swatter. It will just make it very angry and even more aggressive. If you are in a tree stand, it can be used and a shot under the ear or through the heart will stop it. It is too dangerous to depend on the .40 if you arfe hunting on tghe ground. You will NEVER penetrate in a frontal chest shot. As a matter of fact, you will be able to see your bullets sticking out of the hide quite well as they won't penetrate more than about a quarter inch. If you hunt with the .40, be sure to have your organ donor card properly filled out.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from TJ wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

I haven't noticed a difference in time of year shot, generally the smaller they are the better they eat. Cut out the loin meat aka backstraps and turn the rest into sausage. If you want to use the 40 then get close and use a very tough bullet. If you can get a small enough one they are excellent on a rotissere over your grill.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from J4huntfish wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

maybe with super heavy loads. i know the .40 has more knockdown power than a .45 because of the higher pressure good luck. if you have a .30/30 thats a great hog gun

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from TJ wrote 3 years 27 weeks ago

Then .40 has plenty of energy for the task, but it's bullets are not designed for deep penetration on thick skinned animals, thats why I suggested using the toughest bullet you could find. Remember shot placement is always the most important factor.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Just about any auto pistol round is the weak sauce for hunting big game. Even the .45 ACP. They all, .45 included, have tiny energy figures. There is some kind of strange legend that handguns in general are much more powerful than they are. They are just about all pea shooters, even compared to a .223.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

shane is spot on. In fact, no handgun cartridge is really adequate for hunting feral hogs.
NM, your choice of the .30/06 is very wise. Good luck.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cmikles1 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

I think you guys are forgetting the S&W 500 magnum.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cmikles1 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Allow me to qualify that. The 500 is good for hogs, but I agree a 30/30 or 30'06 will do good without the cost of buying the big bullets and the big pistol that shoots them. But if the sky is the limit, why not nab yourself a Big Horn Armory Model 89 Carbine and enjoy the high life.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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