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Q:
Is there a way to tell a male fawn from a doe fawn? Do male and female deer have glands in their legs or do only bucks? Seth Trudeau

Question by seth trudeau. Uploaded on September 01, 2012

Answers (8)

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from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 33 weeks ago

Yes, but you gotta get your hands on 'em first! LOL!!!

Seriously, no!
Short of a genital inspection, they are indistinguishable!

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from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 33 weeks ago

False. They are distinguishable, but it's not easy. You really need to look at the shape of the head. See here: www.huntingnet.com/forum/whitetail-deer-hunting/193782-buck-fawn-vs-doe-...

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 33 weeks ago

They are probably indistinguishable at birth and for several months thereafter, until that head shape thing kicks in as they mature. JMO.

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from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 32 weeks ago

Bioguy01, I just looked at my trail cam photo files of all my fawns for the months of June and July. Every photo of a fawn staring at my trail camera had a flat head. I did not see any female fawns with a small curve on their head. If that website you attached, is correct then I have all little fawn bucks.
I like Bubba idea the best. My idea is, if a fawn is eating at the bait pile and could care less, he is a male or buck. The fawn's twin is on full alert, watching for danger, well she is diffently a female or doe.

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from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 32 weeks ago

Gary D. - It's nearly impossible to tell for the summer months without getting your hands on them. As the deer ages the head starts to develop distinguishable characteristics. I'm assuming the question was referring to distinguishing buck and doe fawns during the season that matters most...the hunting season. It's so important that QDMA found it necessary to produce a poster so hunters are better equipped to tell the difference (www.qdma.com/shop/selective-antlerless-harvest-poster).

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from seth trudeau wrote 1 year 32 weeks ago

Thanks guys that was a lot of help.
Seth Trudeau

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from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 32 weeks ago

Bioguy
I've noted the difference with the head "shape", unfortunately, in the field, deer don't always give you the necessary profile.
Here's another couple of indicators.
Deer will often scratch their ear with a back foot like a dog. Facing away, sometimes you can see a bucks testicles.
Doe fawns have a tendency to squat slightly when urinating.
I suppose, Bioguy, my point is there is no "surefire" method for "sexing" fawns.

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from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 32 weeks ago

Like others have said you can tell by their head usually and usually the longer their snout is the more mature the doe will be. Good hunting!

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from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 33 weeks ago

Yes, but you gotta get your hands on 'em first! LOL!!!

Seriously, no!
Short of a genital inspection, they are indistinguishable!

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from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 33 weeks ago

False. They are distinguishable, but it's not easy. You really need to look at the shape of the head. See here: www.huntingnet.com/forum/whitetail-deer-hunting/193782-buck-fawn-vs-doe-...

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 33 weeks ago

They are probably indistinguishable at birth and for several months thereafter, until that head shape thing kicks in as they mature. JMO.

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from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 32 weeks ago

Bioguy01, I just looked at my trail cam photo files of all my fawns for the months of June and July. Every photo of a fawn staring at my trail camera had a flat head. I did not see any female fawns with a small curve on their head. If that website you attached, is correct then I have all little fawn bucks.
I like Bubba idea the best. My idea is, if a fawn is eating at the bait pile and could care less, he is a male or buck. The fawn's twin is on full alert, watching for danger, well she is diffently a female or doe.

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from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 32 weeks ago

Gary D. - It's nearly impossible to tell for the summer months without getting your hands on them. As the deer ages the head starts to develop distinguishable characteristics. I'm assuming the question was referring to distinguishing buck and doe fawns during the season that matters most...the hunting season. It's so important that QDMA found it necessary to produce a poster so hunters are better equipped to tell the difference (www.qdma.com/shop/selective-antlerless-harvest-poster).

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from seth trudeau wrote 1 year 32 weeks ago

Thanks guys that was a lot of help.
Seth Trudeau

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from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 32 weeks ago

Bioguy
I've noted the difference with the head "shape", unfortunately, in the field, deer don't always give you the necessary profile.
Here's another couple of indicators.
Deer will often scratch their ear with a back foot like a dog. Facing away, sometimes you can see a bucks testicles.
Doe fawns have a tendency to squat slightly when urinating.
I suppose, Bioguy, my point is there is no "surefire" method for "sexing" fawns.

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from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 32 weeks ago

Like others have said you can tell by their head usually and usually the longer their snout is the more mature the doe will be. Good hunting!

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