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Q:
What ammo should I purchase for a 25-06,that will be used for southern whitetail?

Question by getbackonthefield. Uploaded on March 13, 2011

Answers (17)

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from 99explorer wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Although factory ammo for the .25-06 is available with bullets as light as 87 grains, I think the 120-grain load would be preferable for whitetail deer, especially with the Nosler partition bullet.

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from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

I would buy the Federal Fusion 120 grain ammo. It is reasonable priced and especially made for whitetail hunting. I have had good luck with Federal ammo.

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from prairieghost wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

the same kind used on northern whitetails.

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from crm3006 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Been through this a least forty'leven times! Shoot your rifle with various brands and bullet weights, and choose the one that shoots the best. Any of the .25-06 rounds will kill a deer with proper shot placement.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

That Right! try various brands and see what works for you? I like the Hornady 117gr SSt interlock~~~ JMO

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Anything but Hornady, 110 grains and heavier. My friends and I have had crap for accuracy with Hornady factory loads. Might work for you.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

For what it's worth, in the latest issue of Guns and Ammo magazine (April, 2011), Wayne van Zwoll recommends the Winchester 110-grain Accu-Bond ammo for whitetail deer.

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from shane wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

115-120 grains of any good brand that shoots well, or 100 grain Barnes. No lighter. I would take a less accurate bullet if it was a more appropriate weight and design.

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from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

I bought some for someone that didn't bring any ammo to camp, and they said "get whatever they have", and it worked Rem core-locts, I think. That is all they had, but there are lots of choices online. Pretty sweet,low kick and flat-shooting cartridge.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

I've shot most of my 25-06 deer with 100 grain Hornady handloads. Those were predominantly in relatively open prairie lands. In the southern timbers a heavier 117-120 grain bullet cuts through the brush a little better and I would suggest using that unless you are expecting open field shooting. The 117 grain Hornady bullet is still my most accurate 25 caliber hunting bullet. These can all be expected to pancake deer and will penetrate fully.

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from RES1956 wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

120 grain CoreLokt Remington factory ammo, if the accuracy is reasonable. Cheap and readily available.

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from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

117 gr jsp 48.50 grs H4350,, 117 siera game king 47gr 4350... 117gr hornady btsp 52gr H4831.. I like reloads as I can control my outcome better. These loads are through a Weatherby markV and maybe different in your gun, so load lower until you get whats best for your gun. The 117gr bullets are fast to a point 2950 +/- 100fps with these loadings , but they are extremely accurate and put the smack down on whitetail with too much meat damage

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from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

Getback,

I've killed a bunch of deer with a 25/06 in the fields and forests of the south. The problem with a 25/06 is the very reason you have it... velocity. You need to select a bullet that will give you balance between distance and the one that walks out under your stand. I have taken to using a 110 grain Nosler Accubond for all my 25/06 work. They will hold together for a 30 yard shot and still shoot flat for long range pasture/crop field shots. Federal Premium ammo makes them available in factory loads.

If I were to do nothing but woods hunt with a 25/06 I probably follow Sarges advice and choose a good load with a stout 117 - 120 grain bullet. Hand load those same slugs to .257 Roberts velocity levels and you would be in high cotton.

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from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

Beekeeper,
With our hunting here in WV I forget there are long shots. Most of our shots are in the woods and the longest shot that I have made in a pasture field was probably 200 yards. Most of our shots are under 100 yards.

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from getbackonthefield wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

Thanks everyone

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from Keith Costley wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

I hunted for the first time this past deer season with a 25.06 for whitetail deer. Wow! What a wonderful caliber for harvesting whitetails! I am so happy with my purchase (Marlin XL7 bolt action). I used 100 grain Remington Core Lokt bullets. They did a satisfactory job. About half of the whitetails I harvested dropped on the spot of impact, and the other half ran no more than 50 yards. The 100 grain bullet had enough punch for me. On the other hand, I am sure that a 120 grain bullet would provide a little bit more punch. Is it needed? That's a matter of opinion. I have heard nothing but great things about the 115 to 120 grain Nosler Partition bullets. My only problem with them is that they are very pricey. The bottom line is that the majority of factory ammo out there is suitable for deer hunting. Find the ammo that groups the best out of your 25.06 and you should be in pretty good shape.

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from Ricky_Pro wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Remington corelokt. Cheap enough but pack a powerfull punch!

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from 99explorer wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Although factory ammo for the .25-06 is available with bullets as light as 87 grains, I think the 120-grain load would be preferable for whitetail deer, especially with the Nosler partition bullet.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

That Right! try various brands and see what works for you? I like the Hornady 117gr SSt interlock~~~ JMO

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

I would buy the Federal Fusion 120 grain ammo. It is reasonable priced and especially made for whitetail hunting. I have had good luck with Federal ammo.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from prairieghost wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

the same kind used on northern whitetails.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Been through this a least forty'leven times! Shoot your rifle with various brands and bullet weights, and choose the one that shoots the best. Any of the .25-06 rounds will kill a deer with proper shot placement.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Anything but Hornady, 110 grains and heavier. My friends and I have had crap for accuracy with Hornady factory loads. Might work for you.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

115-120 grains of any good brand that shoots well, or 100 grain Barnes. No lighter. I would take a less accurate bullet if it was a more appropriate weight and design.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ricky_Pro wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Remington corelokt. Cheap enough but pack a powerfull punch!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

For what it's worth, in the latest issue of Guns and Ammo magazine (April, 2011), Wayne van Zwoll recommends the Winchester 110-grain Accu-Bond ammo for whitetail deer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

I've shot most of my 25-06 deer with 100 grain Hornady handloads. Those were predominantly in relatively open prairie lands. In the southern timbers a heavier 117-120 grain bullet cuts through the brush a little better and I would suggest using that unless you are expecting open field shooting. The 117 grain Hornady bullet is still my most accurate 25 caliber hunting bullet. These can all be expected to pancake deer and will penetrate fully.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

120 grain CoreLokt Remington factory ammo, if the accuracy is reasonable. Cheap and readily available.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

117 gr jsp 48.50 grs H4350,, 117 siera game king 47gr 4350... 117gr hornady btsp 52gr H4831.. I like reloads as I can control my outcome better. These loads are through a Weatherby markV and maybe different in your gun, so load lower until you get whats best for your gun. The 117gr bullets are fast to a point 2950 +/- 100fps with these loadings , but they are extremely accurate and put the smack down on whitetail with too much meat damage

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

Getback,

I've killed a bunch of deer with a 25/06 in the fields and forests of the south. The problem with a 25/06 is the very reason you have it... velocity. You need to select a bullet that will give you balance between distance and the one that walks out under your stand. I have taken to using a 110 grain Nosler Accubond for all my 25/06 work. They will hold together for a 30 yard shot and still shoot flat for long range pasture/crop field shots. Federal Premium ammo makes them available in factory loads.

If I were to do nothing but woods hunt with a 25/06 I probably follow Sarges advice and choose a good load with a stout 117 - 120 grain bullet. Hand load those same slugs to .257 Roberts velocity levels and you would be in high cotton.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

Beekeeper,
With our hunting here in WV I forget there are long shots. Most of our shots are in the woods and the longest shot that I have made in a pasture field was probably 200 yards. Most of our shots are under 100 yards.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from getbackonthefield wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

Thanks everyone

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Keith Costley wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

I hunted for the first time this past deer season with a 25.06 for whitetail deer. Wow! What a wonderful caliber for harvesting whitetails! I am so happy with my purchase (Marlin XL7 bolt action). I used 100 grain Remington Core Lokt bullets. They did a satisfactory job. About half of the whitetails I harvested dropped on the spot of impact, and the other half ran no more than 50 yards. The 100 grain bullet had enough punch for me. On the other hand, I am sure that a 120 grain bullet would provide a little bit more punch. Is it needed? That's a matter of opinion. I have heard nothing but great things about the 115 to 120 grain Nosler Partition bullets. My only problem with them is that they are very pricey. The bottom line is that the majority of factory ammo out there is suitable for deer hunting. Find the ammo that groups the best out of your 25.06 and you should be in pretty good shape.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

I bought some for someone that didn't bring any ammo to camp, and they said "get whatever they have", and it worked Rem core-locts, I think. That is all they had, but there are lots of choices online. Pretty sweet,low kick and flat-shooting cartridge.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

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