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Q:
What do you guys think of cage hunts? I think they stink and it is unfair for the game to be fenced in. Anybody ever been on one of these hunts or knows someone who has hunted one.

Question by Gary Devine. Uploaded on February 25, 2013

Answers (23)

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

When I lived in Texas, my veterinarian guided a canned hunt for a Siberian tiger. His client was a medical doctor from San Antonio. He videotaped the whole thing and did a voice-over that resulted in his conviction under the Endangered Species Act.
He was fined $40,000. The footage of the actual hunt was shown on local TV, and it was revolting to watch.

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from Pmacc60 wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

I know a man who runs a game ranch in PA,it makes me sick! I don't see the point,deer and elk walk around a heated club house with colored tags in their ears so you know how much its going to cost.One client notice I didn't call him a hunter had his hopes on a certain buck that didn't show up,it was hiding behind a log!They walk the buck out to feed and the client killed it. One client wanted to shoot his buck on the trailer, John had to convince this man that wasn't going to be necessary.To me it would be like shooting my dog in the yard and calling myself a predator hunter.

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from Ncarl wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

Unfortunately I know one dum bass who did one once. He's a heck of a nice guy just wanted a hog hunt on a budget. Seems like a waste of money to me. I wouldn't even want to keep the antlers of anything I shot on a game ranch. Why? You accomplished absolutely nothing. Besides fenced deer hunting preserves have led to CWD in both Iowa and Missouri now. And the preserve owners got off easy cause they were in close with the governor.

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from Treestand wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

A Caned Hunt is not for me! you can't eat the Horns, besides we have Tons of Deer in Fl.

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from 1ojolsen wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

To me its a step (big step) lower than hunting over a corn feeder on a timer and calling yourself a hunter.

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from cb bob wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

My friends are either hunters that believe in fair chase, or non-hunters that understand why we hunt. I guess there are some people that feel the trophy is the most important thing. I prefer the hunt, over the kill.

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from Pray- hunt-work wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

The fence Idea would be great if it were made to keep unsportsmanlike idiots out and away from the animals, but calling that hunting is like calling Obama a shooter. It just ain't the case!

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from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

The closest thing I have seen to a canned hunt [I did not take part] took place on Fire Island NY. There are indiginous Deer on this barrier island. It is seasonaly inhabited 3-4 months out of the year and is a petting zoo. There is a winter die off due to a lack of food. A culling of the herd was proposed. The choice of weapons was a problem due to the housing and proximity to the main land. They finally settled on Bows. Then PETA got involved. Picture the final story. PETA banging pots and pans to scare the Deer. Deer being so hungry the rushed the hunters for food. Hunters could not use their Bows because the Deer where within 5-10 feet. The most human method of "hunting" [IMHO] would have boiled down to a sharp knife and a handful of peanuts. A situation that became the road to Hell paved with good intentions.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

Carl, that sounds pathetic at best.

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from Dcast wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

To each their own. I hunt released pheasants and don't see a problem with hunting them.

As for fenced opperations in Ohio they will becoming to a close soon. Recently they passed a law requiring high fenced opperations whether for hunting or anything else to have each deer test every year, the cost of the test is $200+. I know of one operation that has already closed, that made deer urine attractants. 400 deer(I think that was the number) were put down and given to SAH to feed the hungry.

As a side note to this. It was determined a .223 is more than enough to drop a deer in it's tracks with a shot to the boiler room at 100yds. Frangible bullets being even better. This was determined by a trained SWAT Sniper that I know! He also stated an AR15 is a great deer hunting gun.

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from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

The words "high fence" and "cage" do not belong with the word hunting! I hear of people going on these pheasant/duck shoots, where they let the bird out of a cage and when it flies over they shoot it. That in no way is or should be considered hunting. Hunting is being able to locate the animal you wish to harvest, set up, and hopefully kill it if things work out right! Hunting is not paying to have some birds let out of a cage, or paying to shoot a "trophy" animal that's locked in a fence.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

Ga hunter - The words "high fence" and "canned hunts" do not necessarily mean the same thing. There are some enormous high-fenced ranches in Texas, with several ranches being larger than the state of Rhode Island.
The fences are needed to keep the expensive exotic wildlife from wandering off into places they are not wanted. They also serve to keep poachers from wandering in.

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from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

99E, thank you for letting me know!

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from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

WAM you have no idea. If it was a TV show no one would believe it. If you went on the beach in February - March you would see how ancient man came up with dried out Deer Jerky. A waste of food and a crime against nature.

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from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

It is not for me but I have no problem with people enjoying it if they like. It seems a step up from going to the grocery store for your meat... not much, but it could be more exciting than waiting in the checkout line and having to tear the Saran wrap off.

I can actually see the interest if you have more money than time, don't enjoy the outdoors and want to get a guaranted trophy in one afternoon. I personally would not call it "hunting" as much as "shooting" but I suspect it is exciting to those who have never actually hunted in the wild or shot a gun before and there are getting to be a lot of us in that category. It also depends... some high fence areas cover more territory than some of our states.

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from 1ojolsen wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Sheep live in fences deer jump over them.

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from Dcast wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

GaHunter, those are some extreme scenerios. Like I said I hunt released pheasants and it not throwing them in the air to shoot. We will set them leave them alone for a hour or so then let the dogs loose. They are given a good chance to escape and many do which is a good thing, because without the hunting clubs letting birds loose you wouldn't see pheasants in Ohio and I'm now seeing pheasant more often in places I've never seen them before. Same for the Bobwhite I saw my wild one this past summer along a country road right outside a patch of woods. It was either a released bird that made its way there or got there by means of breading from released birds. Upland bird hunting isn't really an option here without the help of released birds. I must say I'm very thankful to be able to release birds and hunt them regardless of anyones opinions.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

In my early years, I hunted on a shooting preserve with stocked pheasants. The preserve operator planted the birds, and then released a pair of German Shorthaired pointers. He served as guide and handled the dogs. He charged about $5 per bird if you got a shot, whether you hit it or not.
To someone who had never hunted pheasants before, it was great fun, especially watching the dogs work, and it was nice to come home with some birds for dinner.
BTW, the dogs would occasionally find a bird that had not been released that day, meaning the survivors of some previous hunts stayed around to propagate the species in the wild.

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from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Aren't released game birds fed by people their whole entire life. Wouldn't hunting wild pheasants in South Dakota or Iowa be more sporting?

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from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Gary, hunting farms are great for providing an excellent outdoor experience and giving people an opportunity to hone their hunting skills. They are just considerably different than hunting wild pheasants unless the farms are larger than 10,000 acres and release hatched birds to the wild months or years before the hunt.

I grew up living on wild pheasants in South Dakota. I hunted them every day during the season for many years; both with a shotgun and with hawks. By mid-season they get unbelievably smart. Hunters without dogs rarely see them and those with dogs may get a few daily after working so hard their legs hurt (literally). Those pheasants watch and RUN when they see danger. They rarely fly unless caught unawares or several hundred yards from hunters.

They also migrate into tough timber and trash where swinging a shotgun just doesn't work too well and even if you get a shot off, you are more likely to hit a tree than a pheasant. Getting within 40 yards of one is a real accomplishment and the pointers rarely get to point.

Hunting pen-raised pheasants can certainly be fun but they tend to sit tight until a dog pushes them up. They fly low and short distances because they really don't have good flying muscles or experience and they generally sit right where they were released because they don't know what else to do. They tend to come toward hunters looking for food (as they have been taught) rather than fleeing. There are lots of pheasant hunting venues near where I hunt and the many left over pheasants feed the coyotes, hawks and eagles because they really don't know how to defend themselves from these very smart preditors. A few do make it but that number is much lower than most would imagine. You also may notice, if you look around, an unusual number of foxes, coyotes, hawks and eagles because they come to these farms like bees to honey. Hunting farms are in constant battle with these preditors but usually lose in the end.

Is one more sporting than the other... well, yes. In one instance the birds have a fighting chance. In the other they are cannon fodder. If you happen to be on the cannon end of the exchange, they can both be fun though.

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from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Dcast, I see no problem with that because the birds are actually given a chance to escape! But the person I talked to said that they literally shot them as people released them. Whether this is true or not, I don't know. But that just doesn't seem right to me.

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from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Dakotaman, thank you for that educated comment. I never knew that about hunting wild pheasants vs. the pen-raised pheasants.

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from Pray- hunt-work wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

I too have hunted released pheasants, that's how I trained my first Brittany, and also the only hunting club that I have ever been a member of. 99 birds were released on a big blueberry land on Thursday night, no Friday hunting, and you could go at them first thing Saturday morning and the week to follow. Those released birds are the only ringnecks I've ever seen in Maine, or their by product anyway. We still see them every once in a while some 20 miles from the blueberry land, and 5-10 years later.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

Ga hunter - The words "high fence" and "canned hunts" do not necessarily mean the same thing. There are some enormous high-fenced ranches in Texas, with several ranches being larger than the state of Rhode Island.
The fences are needed to keep the expensive exotic wildlife from wandering off into places they are not wanted. They also serve to keep poachers from wandering in.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Gary, hunting farms are great for providing an excellent outdoor experience and giving people an opportunity to hone their hunting skills. They are just considerably different than hunting wild pheasants unless the farms are larger than 10,000 acres and release hatched birds to the wild months or years before the hunt.

I grew up living on wild pheasants in South Dakota. I hunted them every day during the season for many years; both with a shotgun and with hawks. By mid-season they get unbelievably smart. Hunters without dogs rarely see them and those with dogs may get a few daily after working so hard their legs hurt (literally). Those pheasants watch and RUN when they see danger. They rarely fly unless caught unawares or several hundred yards from hunters.

They also migrate into tough timber and trash where swinging a shotgun just doesn't work too well and even if you get a shot off, you are more likely to hit a tree than a pheasant. Getting within 40 yards of one is a real accomplishment and the pointers rarely get to point.

Hunting pen-raised pheasants can certainly be fun but they tend to sit tight until a dog pushes them up. They fly low and short distances because they really don't have good flying muscles or experience and they generally sit right where they were released because they don't know what else to do. They tend to come toward hunters looking for food (as they have been taught) rather than fleeing. There are lots of pheasant hunting venues near where I hunt and the many left over pheasants feed the coyotes, hawks and eagles because they really don't know how to defend themselves from these very smart preditors. A few do make it but that number is much lower than most would imagine. You also may notice, if you look around, an unusual number of foxes, coyotes, hawks and eagles because they come to these farms like bees to honey. Hunting farms are in constant battle with these preditors but usually lose in the end.

Is one more sporting than the other... well, yes. In one instance the birds have a fighting chance. In the other they are cannon fodder. If you happen to be on the cannon end of the exchange, they can both be fun though.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

When I lived in Texas, my veterinarian guided a canned hunt for a Siberian tiger. His client was a medical doctor from San Antonio. He videotaped the whole thing and did a voice-over that resulted in his conviction under the Endangered Species Act.
He was fined $40,000. The footage of the actual hunt was shown on local TV, and it was revolting to watch.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pmacc60 wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

I know a man who runs a game ranch in PA,it makes me sick! I don't see the point,deer and elk walk around a heated club house with colored tags in their ears so you know how much its going to cost.One client notice I didn't call him a hunter had his hopes on a certain buck that didn't show up,it was hiding behind a log!They walk the buck out to feed and the client killed it. One client wanted to shoot his buck on the trailer, John had to convince this man that wasn't going to be necessary.To me it would be like shooting my dog in the yard and calling myself a predator hunter.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ncarl wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

Unfortunately I know one dum bass who did one once. He's a heck of a nice guy just wanted a hog hunt on a budget. Seems like a waste of money to me. I wouldn't even want to keep the antlers of anything I shot on a game ranch. Why? You accomplished absolutely nothing. Besides fenced deer hunting preserves have led to CWD in both Iowa and Missouri now. And the preserve owners got off easy cause they were in close with the governor.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

A Caned Hunt is not for me! you can't eat the Horns, besides we have Tons of Deer in Fl.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

The closest thing I have seen to a canned hunt [I did not take part] took place on Fire Island NY. There are indiginous Deer on this barrier island. It is seasonaly inhabited 3-4 months out of the year and is a petting zoo. There is a winter die off due to a lack of food. A culling of the herd was proposed. The choice of weapons was a problem due to the housing and proximity to the main land. They finally settled on Bows. Then PETA got involved. Picture the final story. PETA banging pots and pans to scare the Deer. Deer being so hungry the rushed the hunters for food. Hunters could not use their Bows because the Deer where within 5-10 feet. The most human method of "hunting" [IMHO] would have boiled down to a sharp knife and a handful of peanuts. A situation that became the road to Hell paved with good intentions.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

Carl, that sounds pathetic at best.

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from Dcast wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

To each their own. I hunt released pheasants and don't see a problem with hunting them.

As for fenced opperations in Ohio they will becoming to a close soon. Recently they passed a law requiring high fenced opperations whether for hunting or anything else to have each deer test every year, the cost of the test is $200+. I know of one operation that has already closed, that made deer urine attractants. 400 deer(I think that was the number) were put down and given to SAH to feed the hungry.

As a side note to this. It was determined a .223 is more than enough to drop a deer in it's tracks with a shot to the boiler room at 100yds. Frangible bullets being even better. This was determined by a trained SWAT Sniper that I know! He also stated an AR15 is a great deer hunting gun.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

The words "high fence" and "cage" do not belong with the word hunting! I hear of people going on these pheasant/duck shoots, where they let the bird out of a cage and when it flies over they shoot it. That in no way is or should be considered hunting. Hunting is being able to locate the animal you wish to harvest, set up, and hopefully kill it if things work out right! Hunting is not paying to have some birds let out of a cage, or paying to shoot a "trophy" animal that's locked in a fence.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

99E, thank you for letting me know!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

It is not for me but I have no problem with people enjoying it if they like. It seems a step up from going to the grocery store for your meat... not much, but it could be more exciting than waiting in the checkout line and having to tear the Saran wrap off.

I can actually see the interest if you have more money than time, don't enjoy the outdoors and want to get a guaranted trophy in one afternoon. I personally would not call it "hunting" as much as "shooting" but I suspect it is exciting to those who have never actually hunted in the wild or shot a gun before and there are getting to be a lot of us in that category. It also depends... some high fence areas cover more territory than some of our states.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dcast wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

GaHunter, those are some extreme scenerios. Like I said I hunt released pheasants and it not throwing them in the air to shoot. We will set them leave them alone for a hour or so then let the dogs loose. They are given a good chance to escape and many do which is a good thing, because without the hunting clubs letting birds loose you wouldn't see pheasants in Ohio and I'm now seeing pheasant more often in places I've never seen them before. Same for the Bobwhite I saw my wild one this past summer along a country road right outside a patch of woods. It was either a released bird that made its way there or got there by means of breading from released birds. Upland bird hunting isn't really an option here without the help of released birds. I must say I'm very thankful to be able to release birds and hunt them regardless of anyones opinions.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Dcast, I see no problem with that because the birds are actually given a chance to escape! But the person I talked to said that they literally shot them as people released them. Whether this is true or not, I don't know. But that just doesn't seem right to me.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 1ojolsen wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

To me its a step (big step) lower than hunting over a corn feeder on a timer and calling yourself a hunter.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cb bob wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

My friends are either hunters that believe in fair chase, or non-hunters that understand why we hunt. I guess there are some people that feel the trophy is the most important thing. I prefer the hunt, over the kill.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pray- hunt-work wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

The fence Idea would be great if it were made to keep unsportsmanlike idiots out and away from the animals, but calling that hunting is like calling Obama a shooter. It just ain't the case!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

WAM you have no idea. If it was a TV show no one would believe it. If you went on the beach in February - March you would see how ancient man came up with dried out Deer Jerky. A waste of food and a crime against nature.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

In my early years, I hunted on a shooting preserve with stocked pheasants. The preserve operator planted the birds, and then released a pair of German Shorthaired pointers. He served as guide and handled the dogs. He charged about $5 per bird if you got a shot, whether you hit it or not.
To someone who had never hunted pheasants before, it was great fun, especially watching the dogs work, and it was nice to come home with some birds for dinner.
BTW, the dogs would occasionally find a bird that had not been released that day, meaning the survivors of some previous hunts stayed around to propagate the species in the wild.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Aren't released game birds fed by people their whole entire life. Wouldn't hunting wild pheasants in South Dakota or Iowa be more sporting?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Dakotaman, thank you for that educated comment. I never knew that about hunting wild pheasants vs. the pen-raised pheasants.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pray- hunt-work wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

I too have hunted released pheasants, that's how I trained my first Brittany, and also the only hunting club that I have ever been a member of. 99 birds were released on a big blueberry land on Thursday night, no Friday hunting, and you could go at them first thing Saturday morning and the week to follow. Those released birds are the only ringnecks I've ever seen in Maine, or their by product anyway. We still see them every once in a while some 20 miles from the blueberry land, and 5-10 years later.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 1ojolsen wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Sheep live in fences deer jump over them.

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