Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

AnswersASK YOUR QUESTION

Answers

Q:
What is your preferred knife for boning out deer quarters?

Question by Drew McClure. Uploaded on February 09, 2011

Answers (14)

Top Rated
All Answers
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Forschner boning knife model model 40017-perfection in form and easy to sharpen, long lasting edge. The ugly stick lite of knives, the versatile and effective 870 of knives 15 bucks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

3 1/2in finn blade

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Chicago Cutlery 5" boning knife. Check Amazon for price and availibility. Works better than any I've used.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I make my own boning knife, a copy of the Chicago utility boning patern,wood handle and contour.I processed deer for 20 years for the House of Meats here in Ohio and they have never let me down. I like the wood handle because it is easier to grip wet then the hard rubber on the Forschner. Sharpness,grip and flexability are important when boning. You only cut yourself with a dull knife and if you slip you get cut or stuck trying to force the blade through

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Never had a "job" processing deer, but like 'rick, I've made my own. Flexibility is a key to a good boning knife. I also prefer wooden handles and use either black walnut or mesquite for that purpose.

Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

The Forschner I use has a wooden handle, it is similar to the Chicago knife except it has more sweep which I prefer, but the Chicago knife is made in America which is nice.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PigHunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use a good kitchen knife, can't remember the brand, and keep one of Lansky's quick sharpeners handy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use my filleting knives. They seem to work okay.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use a fillet knife as well. With the long blade I can cut through the entire length of the quarter along the bone. I know alot of guys just start hacking away at the meat but if you follow the bones you can make quick work of the deboning process.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I can't imagine why anybody would give deerhunterrick a minus---I may get around to making my own knives someday. That statement about sharp vs. dull knives is absolutely true, if you aren't having to saw back and forth and put pressure on the (dull) knife, you are a lot less likely to cut yourself and even if you do, it leaves a nice, trim scar and not a big old ragged thing.

Plus one from me.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Usually a fillet knife.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use an Old Timer 4 1/2 blade and a Chicago Cutlery boning knife. Both of these hold their edge real well and are exceptionally sharp for this kind of work. I wish they still made those Old Timers... I have had two and they have always been great. I just bought another on ebay a few years ago just to be safe.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Trying to score an old forged carbon Old Timer is like scoring a well maintained old Stihl-tough. Fillet knives work well, but anything shorter than 5.5 inches doesn't maximize your stroke in silverskin removal and I leave very little if any unwanted tissue in my "keep" pile. I tried a J. Martinni 571010 but I wanted more length. Even if you don't process your deer a good boning knife is a must have, as it excels from potatoes to preparing pork ribs. You will find it useful.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuckles wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I'm in the fillet knife crowd. A couple of those and a steel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I make my own boning knife, a copy of the Chicago utility boning patern,wood handle and contour.I processed deer for 20 years for the House of Meats here in Ohio and they have never let me down. I like the wood handle because it is easier to grip wet then the hard rubber on the Forschner. Sharpness,grip and flexability are important when boning. You only cut yourself with a dull knife and if you slip you get cut or stuck trying to force the blade through

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I can't imagine why anybody would give deerhunterrick a minus---I may get around to making my own knives someday. That statement about sharp vs. dull knives is absolutely true, if you aren't having to saw back and forth and put pressure on the (dull) knife, you are a lot less likely to cut yourself and even if you do, it leaves a nice, trim scar and not a big old ragged thing.

Plus one from me.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Forschner boning knife model model 40017-perfection in form and easy to sharpen, long lasting edge. The ugly stick lite of knives, the versatile and effective 870 of knives 15 bucks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

3 1/2in finn blade

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

The Forschner I use has a wooden handle, it is similar to the Chicago knife except it has more sweep which I prefer, but the Chicago knife is made in America which is nice.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use an Old Timer 4 1/2 blade and a Chicago Cutlery boning knife. Both of these hold their edge real well and are exceptionally sharp for this kind of work. I wish they still made those Old Timers... I have had two and they have always been great. I just bought another on ebay a few years ago just to be safe.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Trying to score an old forged carbon Old Timer is like scoring a well maintained old Stihl-tough. Fillet knives work well, but anything shorter than 5.5 inches doesn't maximize your stroke in silverskin removal and I leave very little if any unwanted tissue in my "keep" pile. I tried a J. Martinni 571010 but I wanted more length. Even if you don't process your deer a good boning knife is a must have, as it excels from potatoes to preparing pork ribs. You will find it useful.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Chicago Cutlery 5" boning knife. Check Amazon for price and availibility. Works better than any I've used.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Never had a "job" processing deer, but like 'rick, I've made my own. Flexibility is a key to a good boning knife. I also prefer wooden handles and use either black walnut or mesquite for that purpose.

Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PigHunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use a good kitchen knife, can't remember the brand, and keep one of Lansky's quick sharpeners handy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use my filleting knives. They seem to work okay.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use a fillet knife as well. With the long blade I can cut through the entire length of the quarter along the bone. I know alot of guys just start hacking away at the meat but if you follow the bones you can make quick work of the deboning process.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Usually a fillet knife.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuckles wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I'm in the fillet knife crowd. A couple of those and a steel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer