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Q:
Has anyone heard of blue tounge? How do deer get it?

Question by Chris Carpenter. Uploaded on January 27, 2009

Answers (7)

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from buckhunter wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

I thinks that's EHD or epizootic hemilogic disease. I probably butchered the spelling. It's a virul infection passed from deer to deer by insects or casual contact.

I've found two deer on my property this fall that I think had the disease. Both deer were still alive and foaming at the mouth. Both passed shortly after I discovered them.

I think it makes the deer feel thirsty so you find them dead near water.

The disease dies off when the infected animals die.

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from Chris Carpenter wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

Dude thanks alot ive heard rumors that its around here in SW mo. Where do you live Buckhuntr?

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from Beekeeper wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

Chris,

Hemorrhagic disease is the most important infectious disease of white tailed deer in the US. It is very common in the Southeast with outbreaks occuring almost every year here. Southern deer are infected so much that many surivive the out breaks. A good sign that a deer has had the disease are sloughed off or regrowing hooves. Ears and tails are also known to slough due to constricted blood flow brought on by the Hemorrhagic disease. Signs of active EHD in deer are lameness, swollen head, neck, tongue and eyes. Sores are typically present on the tongue and in the mouth. The deer go off feed for obvious reasons and typically can't drink. Missouri and Montana are other areas that have been hard hit in recent years.

The disease is caused by two closely related viruses, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and blue tongue virus. The effects of each are indistinguishable from each other therefore the term EHD is used. It is spread by contact and by biting flies. Saliva is a chief source of the infection. Deer often pick up the disease around feeders where one can infect many...

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from buckhunter wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

Chris, I live in Ohio. We have a 4 month bow season so I'm in the woods a lot. I hope your deer herd isn't affected too much.

Beekeeper knows his stuff.

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from Christian Emter wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

I've heard of it Mule deer get it too. I think they can get by what they eat but i'm not sure.

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from CavRecon wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Gotta love Wikipedia!

http://tinyurl.com/ktafc8

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from Sarge01 wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

I have quite a bit of experience with Hemorrhagic disease. The farmers call it blue tongue and their cows get it. Here in WV we have lost a lot of deer over the past 20 years from the disease. We have found as many as 15 or 20 deer dead in one location. Seems that they can get the disease from diret contact or germs left on forage plants. If anyone has cut a deer open to check them it looks like every blood vessel in their body has ruptured. I'm a retired Conservation Officer and have worked closely with our biologist on the disease. At the present time it does not look like we have any pockets of the disease. However next year it could be back. Like every other wildlife disease it is an educated guess as to how the disease is really passed from one to another. Our main concern now is the pocket of CWD that was found in our state several years ago. So far it looks like it has been contained to a general location with an aggressive study on the disease.

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from buckhunter wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

I thinks that's EHD or epizootic hemilogic disease. I probably butchered the spelling. It's a virul infection passed from deer to deer by insects or casual contact.

I've found two deer on my property this fall that I think had the disease. Both deer were still alive and foaming at the mouth. Both passed shortly after I discovered them.

I think it makes the deer feel thirsty so you find them dead near water.

The disease dies off when the infected animals die.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

Chris,

Hemorrhagic disease is the most important infectious disease of white tailed deer in the US. It is very common in the Southeast with outbreaks occuring almost every year here. Southern deer are infected so much that many surivive the out breaks. A good sign that a deer has had the disease are sloughed off or regrowing hooves. Ears and tails are also known to slough due to constricted blood flow brought on by the Hemorrhagic disease. Signs of active EHD in deer are lameness, swollen head, neck, tongue and eyes. Sores are typically present on the tongue and in the mouth. The deer go off feed for obvious reasons and typically can't drink. Missouri and Montana are other areas that have been hard hit in recent years.

The disease is caused by two closely related viruses, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and blue tongue virus. The effects of each are indistinguishable from each other therefore the term EHD is used. It is spread by contact and by biting flies. Saliva is a chief source of the infection. Deer often pick up the disease around feeders where one can infect many...

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from Christian Emter wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

I've heard of it Mule deer get it too. I think they can get by what they eat but i'm not sure.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

I have quite a bit of experience with Hemorrhagic disease. The farmers call it blue tongue and their cows get it. Here in WV we have lost a lot of deer over the past 20 years from the disease. We have found as many as 15 or 20 deer dead in one location. Seems that they can get the disease from diret contact or germs left on forage plants. If anyone has cut a deer open to check them it looks like every blood vessel in their body has ruptured. I'm a retired Conservation Officer and have worked closely with our biologist on the disease. At the present time it does not look like we have any pockets of the disease. However next year it could be back. Like every other wildlife disease it is an educated guess as to how the disease is really passed from one to another. Our main concern now is the pocket of CWD that was found in our state several years ago. So far it looks like it has been contained to a general location with an aggressive study on the disease.

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from Chris Carpenter wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

Dude thanks alot ive heard rumors that its around here in SW mo. Where do you live Buckhuntr?

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from buckhunter wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

Chris, I live in Ohio. We have a 4 month bow season so I'm in the woods a lot. I hope your deer herd isn't affected too much.

Beekeeper knows his stuff.

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from CavRecon wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Gotta love Wikipedia!

http://tinyurl.com/ktafc8

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