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AnswersASK YOUR QUESTION

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Q:
Are we as sportsman becoming too dependent on modern technology? In this age of GPS, SPOT, laser rangfinders, etc, have we lost even the most basic skills, such as navigating by map and compass? Other than our military guys, how many of us, if disoriented, could find our way out of the woods with just a map and compass?

Question by KingFisher907. Uploaded on May 20, 2009

Answers (37)

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from Big O wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I learned map/compass reading before I started school, learned more in the boy scouts, then more in the military. G.P.S.'s are fine but there are still lots of places that they won't work. So to answer you question, count me as one.

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from rocketman121 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I think so in general. A GPS is useful, but should be used in conjunction with a map. What is SPOT? A laser rangefinder seems to be unneeded. I'm not sure, but I think I could navigate myself out.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rocketman121 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I agree with Big O; a GPS shouldn't be your only method of navigation.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from KMB33 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

probably we are, i think i could but i hunt in woods i know pretty well and know my general directions so maybe not.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from cbalax09 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Like Big O, I was taught map and compass reading at a very early age so I have at least some basic skill of that. I definitely agree with you that some of the fun of hunting or fishing is lost when you just follow a GPS to a spot, rather than finding the way yourself. New technology brings a lot of good for outdoorsmen, but people put too much confidence in their technology which could fail them and cost them their life. Something like a GPS running out of batteries and forgetting a spare set could cost someone their life.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

KingFisher907

Simple question Sir, you just fallen out of your tree stand in the middle of nowhere and you have a compound fracture, severed artery bleeding to death.

NOW WHAT!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

You should use modern devices as aids to your navigational skills, not as replacements. As far as locater beacons go, a good idea, but in some places even if rescuers know where you are it could still take them a long time to get to you, depending on weather and terrain.... not instant salvation.... and I am sure they occasionally fail, Murphy's law has always applied to any man made device I have owned, especially in rough country...

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from barf55 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I was taught to use a map and compass and to find north.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from barf55 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I was taught to use a map and compass and how to find north.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from KingFisher907 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Clay Cooper!
I can always count on you to cut right to the chase...

In that situation, SPOT would be the thing to have, for sure...I can definitely see that it would be a life-saving device...I am merely asking if we have become too dependent on modern gadgets...

When the satellites go down, or the batteries die, we need to be able to rely on experience, common sense and woodsmanship...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from laughing dog wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I love my gadgets, but when I need to know a bearing, it's my ol' Silva compass that points the way.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Yes, I think we are. The older generation got by just fine with a Weaver Scope, standard cartridges, traditional clothing and a pocket compass.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Reminds me of an old Army enlisted man joke. Who is the most dangerous man in the Army? A second lieutenant with a map.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from dokklee wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I do not use a GPS but can see their use in rugged terrain where visability is limited due to mountains or forest cover. I tend to hunt in a half circle when in unknown territory keeping my veichle's location and the road in mind. I have never gotten lost...even in the mountains. I increase the circumference of these half circles each trip and before you know it you have been back in the woods a few miles.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Brother KingFisher907

You know if I didn’t cut right to the chase, I would be out of character, RIGHT! LOL!

Ok fair enough, let me turn this around

Some years ago a fella got certified as an open water diver and went on a diving trip down in the Bahamas. Upon his returned he filed a law suit against the manufacturer of his dive computer saying because it was faulty, saying he couldn’t dive and it ruined his diving trip. The company blasted back saying this person was a certified diver and by his certification alone must know how to manually calculate his dives period. The company countered sued and won hands down.

If you’re going to use other means of whatever, you damn well better know the basics!

Fair enough KingFisher907 B)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

idahooutdoors

First of all I don’t go by Murphy’s Law which has umpteen gazillion laws

I go by Sergeant Coopers Law which has only one simple law

Murphy was an optimist!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Never used anything but a Topo map and a compass, even in Alaska. Most of the time don't use a compass either. I sure can get lost in the city but so far woods have not been a problem.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from greybeard50 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

If you're not prepared/competent enought to not fall from a tree stand. I'd call the results natural selection or survival of the smartest/fitest?
Learn the basics. Save the batteries for the kids toys.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuckles wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Granpa made sure all of us could find our way around with map and compass and key star locations. GPS and all the rest are good backups especially in more remote locations but batteries fail and your brain doesn't unless you let it. Plus you have to figure out and remember how to use all the techno gadgets. The compass stuff and watching your backtrail is instictive once you have practiced enough.
Clay, how did you fall out of that stand using a fall restraint and safety harness? GPS and SPOT can't fix stupid.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I remember that day Denise called and said lets go, so I grabbed the 22-250, 50 rounds and the Johnny Stewart call. While exiting the main Gate at Holloman AFB for our hunting area located on the most northern end of Fort Bliss Military Reservation east of US54 and south of Alamogordo New Mexico, I noticed I didn’t reinstall the radio. I figured I didn’t need it and pressed on the accelerator. Had a good time we did, 5 coyotes and a few Jack rabbits. While pulling into my driveway, Mrs. Smith my neighbor and wife of another hunting buddy said we have been trying to reach you on the radio and Mike is out on a search! A Boy Scout was climbing a rock cliff in Dogwood Canyon just a mile or 2 just north were I was hunting fail over 15 feet puncturing a lung and other serious injuries. The young boy died while being air lifted out.

Some of you may take crack shots at those such as me for having electronic equipment such as a GPS and SPOT. You have no clue who I am, the training, experience and my abilities. Not only I carry a GPS and SPOT, I also carry a field programmable dual band VHF and UHF transceiver capable of not only transmitting and receiving on Amateur Radio Frequencies, but as well on Government frequencies including Law Enforcement and Air Evac. Those in the S&R, Law Enforcement and Red Cross say I’m a rolling Command Post.

About that young Boy Scout that died on that Sunday, the following day at work my Branch Chief said laughing out loud, “He deserves it!” and chastised me for taking interest in the State Police Search and Rescue in Alamogordo New Mexico. The following morning, he came and stood in front of my disk and said with tears, I’m sorry for what I have said yesterday and he did so in front of the entire office for all to hear. That young man was the son of his best friend, the same boy that went to school, came over for sleep over’s and played together with his son.

What I find in some of those that lack knowledge especially in experience, make up in ignorance!

By the way chuckles, who said I fall out of that stand using a fall restraint and safety harness?

GPS and SPOT can't fix stupid?

Who’s chuckling now!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

KingFisher907

Yes we have been dependent on modern gadgets, and we do need to know the basics for sure. But with today’s technological advancements such as Air Evac etc, knowing your exact location can be fatal! Can you run for help for someone that is hurt and go back to that very same location in total darkness? I always carry 2 sets of backup batteries for each and install new ones each time I use it. What I carry mainly isn’t for me, although it’s nice to have, it’s for those I have come across including the extra 2 gallons of premixed 32:1 gas on my ATV.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

By the way, even with my trusty Ol’Army GI compass, I found compasses not reliable in Alaska because of sporadic magnetic interferences. Really don’t need one, there are plenty of mountains and other land marks such as ridges and rivers etc to find your location on a map.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rocky d bashaw wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

i like old school, compass and string to mark way

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

OOPS, not Dogwood Canyon, it's Dog Canyon!

Latitude 32.7581N
Longitude 105.8857W

rocky d bashaw

AMEN to that!

In High School ROTC, my team was the only team to successfully go thru the land navigation course, the same the Army uses at Fort Chaffee Arkansas. The Sergeant running the course gave us toughest and my team was made up by 3 young ladies and myself! O’YA! And we were the only team to pass the course and lost by some 30 seconds for beating the course in record time!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuckles wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Aww now Clay, no need to take it personal. I was just asking along the lines of Kingfisher's earlier comment that GPS and SPOT don't replace common sense and good safety practices. If you ignore the basics bad stuff happens and if you blow an artery SPOT will help them find the body but not much else in the middle of nowhere. Sometimes even when you do everything right stuff goes wrong and the technology has saved a lot of folks in tight situations. I just hate to see people treat it as a substitute for basic safety and woodmanship.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I don't know how to use a GPS. I know how to use a compass.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jeff Bowers wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

In an emergency, I would want the full line of every modern technology to help me.

But you should know how not to become like the lost Boy Scout at all times with the simplest tools you can learn.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sharkfin wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

The only time I use a gps is on the water or driving. I'm good in the woods, or at least have not had any issues so far. Of course I'm only 38. Maybe by the time I'm Clay's age my mind will start to go too!!

Just jabbing at ya Coop!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Sharkfin

+1 for you B)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Have you ever carried a piece of gear that you really have no need until someone else needs it in an 911 Emergency?

Know what I mean dar Vern!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sharkfin wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I stuck a road flare in a crazy dog's eye one time. Seemed like a good use in that emergency.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hjohn429 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Something so basic and potentially vital should be taught in like 2nd or 3rd grade.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I'm all for learning as much as possible about navigation and survival. It seems that there is always more to learn to improve our safety and simplify our lives. I do use a GPS some times when the country is foreign and it has helped but I don't forget about backups like compass, etc. For survival sake, I have to give my #1 prize to my sister who gave my dad CPR for 45 minutes after his heart failure out in the boonies. It took that long for the medivac chopper to reach them. Since she is a cardialology nurse, she knew that skill just a little better than everyone else and it paid off. He recovered fine. I'm not sure I feel stupid for not knowing that skill as well as she does but I sure was glad to have her expertise. I agree that schools should teach basic navigation, CPR and survival skills but around me it would never happen.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from atdyer wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I've been involved with my Boy Scout troop as an adult leader for the past 25 years. We still teach the basics of orienteering using a good compass. It's easy to keep in a pocket, & it always works. Keep it simple.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bill Soles wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

From a newcomer. "B-outside"....Like atdyer, I've been involved with Boy Scouts for more than 20 years also. And with all the bad media I keep hearing about Scouts, I will always believe in its teachings. I actually teach wilderness suvival to Scouts. And the most important thing is your own wit. I don't even own, or know how to use any hi-tech gadgets. I barely know how to use the cell phone my wife likes me carry when I'm out and about with the scouts, or hunting and fishing I like to do as often I can. So I'm all for knowing at least basic woods wisdom to enjoy the outdoors.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jsobrien wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I can't afford any of the fancy stuff so I still do it the old way.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jordjohn44 wrote 4 years 25 weeks ago

I rely on my senses and my compass. I don't trust a gps because who knows when the batteries are going to die and rangefinders seem useless to me. I do think some people are a little to reliant on these items though.

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from Big O wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I learned map/compass reading before I started school, learned more in the boy scouts, then more in the military. G.P.S.'s are fine but there are still lots of places that they won't work. So to answer you question, count me as one.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from cbalax09 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Like Big O, I was taught map and compass reading at a very early age so I have at least some basic skill of that. I definitely agree with you that some of the fun of hunting or fishing is lost when you just follow a GPS to a spot, rather than finding the way yourself. New technology brings a lot of good for outdoorsmen, but people put too much confidence in their technology which could fail them and cost them their life. Something like a GPS running out of batteries and forgetting a spare set could cost someone their life.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

You should use modern devices as aids to your navigational skills, not as replacements. As far as locater beacons go, a good idea, but in some places even if rescuers know where you are it could still take them a long time to get to you, depending on weather and terrain.... not instant salvation.... and I am sure they occasionally fail, Murphy's law has always applied to any man made device I have owned, especially in rough country...

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from rocketman121 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I agree with Big O; a GPS shouldn't be your only method of navigation.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I remember that day Denise called and said lets go, so I grabbed the 22-250, 50 rounds and the Johnny Stewart call. While exiting the main Gate at Holloman AFB for our hunting area located on the most northern end of Fort Bliss Military Reservation east of US54 and south of Alamogordo New Mexico, I noticed I didn’t reinstall the radio. I figured I didn’t need it and pressed on the accelerator. Had a good time we did, 5 coyotes and a few Jack rabbits. While pulling into my driveway, Mrs. Smith my neighbor and wife of another hunting buddy said we have been trying to reach you on the radio and Mike is out on a search! A Boy Scout was climbing a rock cliff in Dogwood Canyon just a mile or 2 just north were I was hunting fail over 15 feet puncturing a lung and other serious injuries. The young boy died while being air lifted out.

Some of you may take crack shots at those such as me for having electronic equipment such as a GPS and SPOT. You have no clue who I am, the training, experience and my abilities. Not only I carry a GPS and SPOT, I also carry a field programmable dual band VHF and UHF transceiver capable of not only transmitting and receiving on Amateur Radio Frequencies, but as well on Government frequencies including Law Enforcement and Air Evac. Those in the S&R, Law Enforcement and Red Cross say I’m a rolling Command Post.

About that young Boy Scout that died on that Sunday, the following day at work my Branch Chief said laughing out loud, “He deserves it!” and chastised me for taking interest in the State Police Search and Rescue in Alamogordo New Mexico. The following morning, he came and stood in front of my disk and said with tears, I’m sorry for what I have said yesterday and he did so in front of the entire office for all to hear. That young man was the son of his best friend, the same boy that went to school, came over for sleep over’s and played together with his son.

What I find in some of those that lack knowledge especially in experience, make up in ignorance!

By the way chuckles, who said I fall out of that stand using a fall restraint and safety harness?

GPS and SPOT can't fix stupid?

Who’s chuckling now!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from rocketman121 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I think so in general. A GPS is useful, but should be used in conjunction with a map. What is SPOT? A laser rangefinder seems to be unneeded. I'm not sure, but I think I could navigate myself out.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from KMB33 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

probably we are, i think i could but i hunt in woods i know pretty well and know my general directions so maybe not.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from KingFisher907 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Clay Cooper!
I can always count on you to cut right to the chase...

In that situation, SPOT would be the thing to have, for sure...I can definitely see that it would be a life-saving device...I am merely asking if we have become too dependent on modern gadgets...

When the satellites go down, or the batteries die, we need to be able to rely on experience, common sense and woodsmanship...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Yes, I think we are. The older generation got by just fine with a Weaver Scope, standard cartridges, traditional clothing and a pocket compass.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Reminds me of an old Army enlisted man joke. Who is the most dangerous man in the Army? A second lieutenant with a map.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

idahooutdoors

First of all I don’t go by Murphy’s Law which has umpteen gazillion laws

I go by Sergeant Coopers Law which has only one simple law

Murphy was an optimist!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Never used anything but a Topo map and a compass, even in Alaska. Most of the time don't use a compass either. I sure can get lost in the city but so far woods have not been a problem.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from greybeard50 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

If you're not prepared/competent enought to not fall from a tree stand. I'd call the results natural selection or survival of the smartest/fitest?
Learn the basics. Save the batteries for the kids toys.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hjohn429 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Something so basic and potentially vital should be taught in like 2nd or 3rd grade.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from atdyer wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I've been involved with my Boy Scout troop as an adult leader for the past 25 years. We still teach the basics of orienteering using a good compass. It's easy to keep in a pocket, & it always works. Keep it simple.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

KingFisher907

Simple question Sir, you just fallen out of your tree stand in the middle of nowhere and you have a compound fracture, severed artery bleeding to death.

NOW WHAT!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from barf55 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I was taught to use a map and compass and to find north.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from barf55 wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I was taught to use a map and compass and how to find north.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from laughing dog wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I love my gadgets, but when I need to know a bearing, it's my ol' Silva compass that points the way.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dokklee wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I do not use a GPS but can see their use in rugged terrain where visability is limited due to mountains or forest cover. I tend to hunt in a half circle when in unknown territory keeping my veichle's location and the road in mind. I have never gotten lost...even in the mountains. I increase the circumference of these half circles each trip and before you know it you have been back in the woods a few miles.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuckles wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Granpa made sure all of us could find our way around with map and compass and key star locations. GPS and all the rest are good backups especially in more remote locations but batteries fail and your brain doesn't unless you let it. Plus you have to figure out and remember how to use all the techno gadgets. The compass stuff and watching your backtrail is instictive once you have practiced enough.
Clay, how did you fall out of that stand using a fall restraint and safety harness? GPS and SPOT can't fix stupid.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

KingFisher907

Yes we have been dependent on modern gadgets, and we do need to know the basics for sure. But with today’s technological advancements such as Air Evac etc, knowing your exact location can be fatal! Can you run for help for someone that is hurt and go back to that very same location in total darkness? I always carry 2 sets of backup batteries for each and install new ones each time I use it. What I carry mainly isn’t for me, although it’s nice to have, it’s for those I have come across including the extra 2 gallons of premixed 32:1 gas on my ATV.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

By the way, even with my trusty Ol’Army GI compass, I found compasses not reliable in Alaska because of sporadic magnetic interferences. Really don’t need one, there are plenty of mountains and other land marks such as ridges and rivers etc to find your location on a map.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rocky d bashaw wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

i like old school, compass and string to mark way

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

OOPS, not Dogwood Canyon, it's Dog Canyon!

Latitude 32.7581N
Longitude 105.8857W

rocky d bashaw

AMEN to that!

In High School ROTC, my team was the only team to successfully go thru the land navigation course, the same the Army uses at Fort Chaffee Arkansas. The Sergeant running the course gave us toughest and my team was made up by 3 young ladies and myself! O’YA! And we were the only team to pass the course and lost by some 30 seconds for beating the course in record time!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuckles wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Aww now Clay, no need to take it personal. I was just asking along the lines of Kingfisher's earlier comment that GPS and SPOT don't replace common sense and good safety practices. If you ignore the basics bad stuff happens and if you blow an artery SPOT will help them find the body but not much else in the middle of nowhere. Sometimes even when you do everything right stuff goes wrong and the technology has saved a lot of folks in tight situations. I just hate to see people treat it as a substitute for basic safety and woodmanship.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I don't know how to use a GPS. I know how to use a compass.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jeff Bowers wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

In an emergency, I would want the full line of every modern technology to help me.

But you should know how not to become like the lost Boy Scout at all times with the simplest tools you can learn.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sharkfin wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

The only time I use a gps is on the water or driving. I'm good in the woods, or at least have not had any issues so far. Of course I'm only 38. Maybe by the time I'm Clay's age my mind will start to go too!!

Just jabbing at ya Coop!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Sharkfin

+1 for you B)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Have you ever carried a piece of gear that you really have no need until someone else needs it in an 911 Emergency?

Know what I mean dar Vern!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sharkfin wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

I stuck a road flare in a crazy dog's eye one time. Seemed like a good use in that emergency.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I'm all for learning as much as possible about navigation and survival. It seems that there is always more to learn to improve our safety and simplify our lives. I do use a GPS some times when the country is foreign and it has helped but I don't forget about backups like compass, etc. For survival sake, I have to give my #1 prize to my sister who gave my dad CPR for 45 minutes after his heart failure out in the boonies. It took that long for the medivac chopper to reach them. Since she is a cardialology nurse, she knew that skill just a little better than everyone else and it paid off. He recovered fine. I'm not sure I feel stupid for not knowing that skill as well as she does but I sure was glad to have her expertise. I agree that schools should teach basic navigation, CPR and survival skills but around me it would never happen.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bill Soles wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

From a newcomer. "B-outside"....Like atdyer, I've been involved with Boy Scouts for more than 20 years also. And with all the bad media I keep hearing about Scouts, I will always believe in its teachings. I actually teach wilderness suvival to Scouts. And the most important thing is your own wit. I don't even own, or know how to use any hi-tech gadgets. I barely know how to use the cell phone my wife likes me carry when I'm out and about with the scouts, or hunting and fishing I like to do as often I can. So I'm all for knowing at least basic woods wisdom to enjoy the outdoors.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jsobrien wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I can't afford any of the fancy stuff so I still do it the old way.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 47 weeks ago

Brother KingFisher907

You know if I didn’t cut right to the chase, I would be out of character, RIGHT! LOL!

Ok fair enough, let me turn this around

Some years ago a fella got certified as an open water diver and went on a diving trip down in the Bahamas. Upon his returned he filed a law suit against the manufacturer of his dive computer saying because it was faulty, saying he couldn’t dive and it ruined his diving trip. The company blasted back saying this person was a certified diver and by his certification alone must know how to manually calculate his dives period. The company countered sued and won hands down.

If you’re going to use other means of whatever, you damn well better know the basics!

Fair enough KingFisher907 B)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jordjohn44 wrote 4 years 25 weeks ago

I rely on my senses and my compass. I don't trust a gps because who knows when the batteries are going to die and rangefinders seem useless to me. I do think some people are a little to reliant on these items though.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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