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Q:
best 25-06 bullet for whitetail deer at around 100-200 yard shots? brand, grain wt., etc.

Question by Reid Jones. Uploaded on April 24, 2009

Answers (7)

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from hunterkid94 wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

yea some one needs to answer this question. whitetail is all i really am going to hunt with my 25/06. that and varmits. maybe you can suggest varmit rounds too?

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from Reid Jones wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

well a varmint round is just a 70 grain bullet. anything really will work as long as it's light. for varmints you don't really need to worry much about hollow points or anything that will do alot of damage. just a light bullet.

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from rezavoirdog wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

Increase the wieght to at least 100 Grains. Hornady 117 Grain SST are a good deer bullet; Remington 100 Grain or 120 Grain PSP; Winchester Supreme 110 Grain Accubonds.

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from Del in KS wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

I use Barnes Triple X's in 100 grain. They don't blow up at high velocity and hold velocity out to long range very well. They also penetrate very well giving you an exit wound that bleeds well. I don't use factory ammo so am not sure if you can buy them that way.

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from rezavoirdog wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

I don't know if I would use a 25-06 for varmints, the bullets for that caliber are too expensive for that! Unless of course, you reload you own...

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

For deer you don’t need no fancy named bullet a 100 grainer will do you just fine! Just a regular soft point will do that doesn’t break the bank!! LOL!!! I’ve used Speer, Sierra, Nosler and Hornady and never had a problem. I make my 25-06 cases out of Lake City Match 30-06 trimmed to length, 55 grains of IMR4831 with a Federal 215 Magnum primer topped with either a Nosler Solid Base or Hornady Soft Point.

I prefer the Hornady and Nosler over the rest, Sierra’s I’ve had jacket separation on practically every shot with both 25 cal 117 BTSP and 338 Cal 250 BTSP. Bullet going in one side and two holes going out!

In case the bullets self destructs you still have the “BASE” of the Nosler Solid Base still plowing!!

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from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

I'm with Clay. The 100 grain .257 spire point bullet of just about any type is a great deer bullet coming from the 25-06, especially if you are in Nebraska where you will see long range and running shots. I shoot Hornady bullets because they are cheap and accurate but you can pay three or four times as much if you want. Just don't expect to recover the bullets to see how they performed because they will all penetrate a deer completely and then some. I have only recovered one of these from a deer in my 45 years of hunting and that was an end-to-end shot from the back to the front... the 100 grain Hornady broke pelvis, three ribs on left, three ribs on right and split the heart lodging in the skin of the brisket. Needless to say, like most of the deer shot with this bullet, the deer never moved a muscle after the shot. I like H4831 too but would work up to Clay's load as it will be a smokin' hot one. I know that those of us who shoot 30-06s and such think a 100 grain bullet is way too light for deer but this is not the case with the 25-06. The 100 grain is deadly on deer and can be used with confidence. Some like the 120 grain bullet but I think they are more story writers and story readers than hunters. The 120 goes noticably slower than the 100 grain and makes calculating the lead more difficult if those deer are out there cruising. I don't use them except for very long range target practice. However, one of my hunting buddies loves them and uses them exclusively. I'm here to tell you, a deer hit with a 120 folds up good too. I do NOT recommend using 90 grain and lighter for deer unless it is a Barnes or something that REALLY holds together. Even premium bullets at this speed may disintegrate on impact with hard bone. I hate to tell you this but among my hunting buddies, 5 nice bucks were smacked in the shoulder at less than 100 yards with 87 or 90 grain bullets last Fall and were never seen again. I have seen way too much of that. The bullets explode on impact with shoulder and do not always penetrate. (of course the same guys have killed dozens with these bullets but I want a sure thing). I bought them all Barnes TSX 100 grains for Christmas this year... they are superb. I use Hornady 75 grain hollow points or VMAX for varmints but will shoot 87 grain hollow points if I am hunting coyotes at 200-600 yards (the 75 grain decks them all right but can kind of blow them up if you hit them wrong). Surprisngly though, most coyotes I have shot with the 75s have just a dime sized exit hole though. The 75 grain bullets are my most accurate and they are flat shooting at over 3,700 fps. They don't really burn barrels either as I have shot tens of thousands of them and have only had to re-barrel three times in my lifetime. By the way, I shot an antelope with a 75 grain because that is all I had with me. I won't do it again. It instantly looked like someone had passed a football through his chest as I could see 6 inches of daylight through his chest as he fell... too much meat damage.

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from rudyglove27 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

Agreed with Del in KS and + 1 for you sir!!!

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from czechmate wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

My personal favored for many years is a 117gr. Federal Premium load. Sure, 100gr is faster, but I like to have as much weight to deliver hydrostatic shock as I have available in this caliber. It is also better bullet than a plain 120gr. Remington. Sighted 1 1/2" high at 100 yards it is good to 300 yards. At that distance it still packs a fairly nice killing power for any size whitetail or mule deer.

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from hunterkid94 wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

yea some one needs to answer this question. whitetail is all i really am going to hunt with my 25/06. that and varmits. maybe you can suggest varmit rounds too?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Reid Jones wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

well a varmint round is just a 70 grain bullet. anything really will work as long as it's light. for varmints you don't really need to worry much about hollow points or anything that will do alot of damage. just a light bullet.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rezavoirdog wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

Increase the wieght to at least 100 Grains. Hornady 117 Grain SST are a good deer bullet; Remington 100 Grain or 120 Grain PSP; Winchester Supreme 110 Grain Accubonds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

I use Barnes Triple X's in 100 grain. They don't blow up at high velocity and hold velocity out to long range very well. They also penetrate very well giving you an exit wound that bleeds well. I don't use factory ammo so am not sure if you can buy them that way.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rezavoirdog wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

I don't know if I would use a 25-06 for varmints, the bullets for that caliber are too expensive for that! Unless of course, you reload you own...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

For deer you don’t need no fancy named bullet a 100 grainer will do you just fine! Just a regular soft point will do that doesn’t break the bank!! LOL!!! I’ve used Speer, Sierra, Nosler and Hornady and never had a problem. I make my 25-06 cases out of Lake City Match 30-06 trimmed to length, 55 grains of IMR4831 with a Federal 215 Magnum primer topped with either a Nosler Solid Base or Hornady Soft Point.

I prefer the Hornady and Nosler over the rest, Sierra’s I’ve had jacket separation on practically every shot with both 25 cal 117 BTSP and 338 Cal 250 BTSP. Bullet going in one side and two holes going out!

In case the bullets self destructs you still have the “BASE” of the Nosler Solid Base still plowing!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 51 weeks ago

I'm with Clay. The 100 grain .257 spire point bullet of just about any type is a great deer bullet coming from the 25-06, especially if you are in Nebraska where you will see long range and running shots. I shoot Hornady bullets because they are cheap and accurate but you can pay three or four times as much if you want. Just don't expect to recover the bullets to see how they performed because they will all penetrate a deer completely and then some. I have only recovered one of these from a deer in my 45 years of hunting and that was an end-to-end shot from the back to the front... the 100 grain Hornady broke pelvis, three ribs on left, three ribs on right and split the heart lodging in the skin of the brisket. Needless to say, like most of the deer shot with this bullet, the deer never moved a muscle after the shot. I like H4831 too but would work up to Clay's load as it will be a smokin' hot one. I know that those of us who shoot 30-06s and such think a 100 grain bullet is way too light for deer but this is not the case with the 25-06. The 100 grain is deadly on deer and can be used with confidence. Some like the 120 grain bullet but I think they are more story writers and story readers than hunters. The 120 goes noticably slower than the 100 grain and makes calculating the lead more difficult if those deer are out there cruising. I don't use them except for very long range target practice. However, one of my hunting buddies loves them and uses them exclusively. I'm here to tell you, a deer hit with a 120 folds up good too. I do NOT recommend using 90 grain and lighter for deer unless it is a Barnes or something that REALLY holds together. Even premium bullets at this speed may disintegrate on impact with hard bone. I hate to tell you this but among my hunting buddies, 5 nice bucks were smacked in the shoulder at less than 100 yards with 87 or 90 grain bullets last Fall and were never seen again. I have seen way too much of that. The bullets explode on impact with shoulder and do not always penetrate. (of course the same guys have killed dozens with these bullets but I want a sure thing). I bought them all Barnes TSX 100 grains for Christmas this year... they are superb. I use Hornady 75 grain hollow points or VMAX for varmints but will shoot 87 grain hollow points if I am hunting coyotes at 200-600 yards (the 75 grain decks them all right but can kind of blow them up if you hit them wrong). Surprisngly though, most coyotes I have shot with the 75s have just a dime sized exit hole though. The 75 grain bullets are my most accurate and they are flat shooting at over 3,700 fps. They don't really burn barrels either as I have shot tens of thousands of them and have only had to re-barrel three times in my lifetime. By the way, I shot an antelope with a 75 grain because that is all I had with me. I won't do it again. It instantly looked like someone had passed a football through his chest as I could see 6 inches of daylight through his chest as he fell... too much meat damage.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

Agreed with Del in KS and + 1 for you sir!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from czechmate wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

My personal favored for many years is a 117gr. Federal Premium load. Sure, 100gr is faster, but I like to have as much weight to deliver hydrostatic shock as I have available in this caliber. It is also better bullet than a plain 120gr. Remington. Sighted 1 1/2" high at 100 yards it is good to 300 yards. At that distance it still packs a fairly nice killing power for any size whitetail or mule deer.

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