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Q:
does anybody have any tips for shooting 300-600 yards with a 270, 130 grain bullet

Question by tennesseedeerhunter. Uploaded on February 01, 2010

Answers (10)

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from crm3006 wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Get closer.

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from Sourdough Dave wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Zero your scope for 200 yards. You will be about an inch and a half high at 100 dead on at 200, 6" low at 300, and a little over a foot low at 400. On elk sized game any of those are a kill shot. At 500 the drop is more in the one yard range and at 600 you need to imagine a rider on his back and the advice of crm3006 holds true.

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from dukkillr wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Practice, practice, practice! Get the best scope you can lay your hands on, a firm rest...and get closer if you can.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Yes, I do. Don't try it. Anything beyond 300 yards is too risky - for the animal especially.

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from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Sourdough Dave knows what he's talkimg about here.

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

know your ballistics. practice often

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from bobcat.trapper.95 wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

if your shootin animals i wouldnt...its not as exciting as close up and its more risky

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from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Anyone can learn to shoot deer at that range. However it is not easy and none of us like cruel crackpots taking pot shots at deer at that range until they can send one off limping away and brag about hitting it. There is a lot of work and expense involved in successfully and ethically taking a shot at a live animal at long range. Like all other ethical types of hunting (like bow hunting) you have to practice enough to be confident of a kill shot and you shouldn't be shooting at live deer until you are truly ready. You need to practice until you are able to predictably hit 10 shots in a row in a six inch circle (a three inch circle is better). If you or your rifle can't do this at a specific range, then you should not be shooting at this range. Once you have bullet drop pegged, the next thing you need to practice is wind. You need to be able to read wind velocity and adjust your windage properly. Get a ballistic table for your load and understand windage and drop for your load. Practice in various winds and make sure you can quickly make the proper adjustments. I suggest starting at 200 yards, then 300 yards and so on until you can hit the six inch circle consistently. Practice in all winds and be prepared to NOT take the shot if you don't understand the wind and its related adjustment. A 10 mph cross wind will blow your bullet 30 inches at 600 yards. Winds of 20-30 mph are common in many locations and they come from all directions. If you have a good rifle and shoot a few hundred rounds practicing methodically, you will find that your rifle can reliably hit a deer at 600 yards. I would recmmend that you use 150g very low drag bullets for 600 yard shooting so that you have enough power to deck a deer at that range. Your 130s will get there and may do the job but they have marginal power for this range. Oh, also, if you don't have mil dots, you should get familiar with holdover and lead at each range as you practice... for example horizontal crosshair on back, on the eyes, on top of horns, one foot over horns, etc... you also need to know how far it is from the deer's heart to the tail so you can use that to judge windage. Good luck and be responsible.

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from jamesti wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

shoot at 300, don't shoot at 600.

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from jwallen wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

For practice I take 1 gallon plastic milk jugs and fill them with water and set them down at various points on a hillside. I walk out from them and stop when the furthest is at what I would guess is my maximum range. Set up a field realistic rest over a daypack and range the jugs. If I can't bust every jug, every time I am trying to shoot too far. I have great luck with 150 grain Nosler Ballistic tips at long range out of my .270. Out to 300 or 350 yards this is not hard but as you pass 400 it becomes a whole new game. Listen to what dakotaman has to say, he is right on the mark.

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from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Anyone can learn to shoot deer at that range. However it is not easy and none of us like cruel crackpots taking pot shots at deer at that range until they can send one off limping away and brag about hitting it. There is a lot of work and expense involved in successfully and ethically taking a shot at a live animal at long range. Like all other ethical types of hunting (like bow hunting) you have to practice enough to be confident of a kill shot and you shouldn't be shooting at live deer until you are truly ready. You need to practice until you are able to predictably hit 10 shots in a row in a six inch circle (a three inch circle is better). If you or your rifle can't do this at a specific range, then you should not be shooting at this range. Once you have bullet drop pegged, the next thing you need to practice is wind. You need to be able to read wind velocity and adjust your windage properly. Get a ballistic table for your load and understand windage and drop for your load. Practice in various winds and make sure you can quickly make the proper adjustments. I suggest starting at 200 yards, then 300 yards and so on until you can hit the six inch circle consistently. Practice in all winds and be prepared to NOT take the shot if you don't understand the wind and its related adjustment. A 10 mph cross wind will blow your bullet 30 inches at 600 yards. Winds of 20-30 mph are common in many locations and they come from all directions. If you have a good rifle and shoot a few hundred rounds practicing methodically, you will find that your rifle can reliably hit a deer at 600 yards. I would recmmend that you use 150g very low drag bullets for 600 yard shooting so that you have enough power to deck a deer at that range. Your 130s will get there and may do the job but they have marginal power for this range. Oh, also, if you don't have mil dots, you should get familiar with holdover and lead at each range as you practice... for example horizontal crosshair on back, on the eyes, on top of horns, one foot over horns, etc... you also need to know how far it is from the deer's heart to the tail so you can use that to judge windage. Good luck and be responsible.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Get closer.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sourdough Dave wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Zero your scope for 200 yards. You will be about an inch and a half high at 100 dead on at 200, 6" low at 300, and a little over a foot low at 400. On elk sized game any of those are a kill shot. At 500 the drop is more in the one yard range and at 600 you need to imagine a rider on his back and the advice of crm3006 holds true.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

know your ballistics. practice often

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Sourdough Dave knows what he's talkimg about here.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dukkillr wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Practice, practice, practice! Get the best scope you can lay your hands on, a firm rest...and get closer if you can.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

Yes, I do. Don't try it. Anything beyond 300 yards is too risky - for the animal especially.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

shoot at 300, don't shoot at 600.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jwallen wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

For practice I take 1 gallon plastic milk jugs and fill them with water and set them down at various points on a hillside. I walk out from them and stop when the furthest is at what I would guess is my maximum range. Set up a field realistic rest over a daypack and range the jugs. If I can't bust every jug, every time I am trying to shoot too far. I have great luck with 150 grain Nosler Ballistic tips at long range out of my .270. Out to 300 or 350 yards this is not hard but as you pass 400 it becomes a whole new game. Listen to what dakotaman has to say, he is right on the mark.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bobcat.trapper.95 wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

if your shootin animals i wouldnt...its not as exciting as close up and its more risky

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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