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Q:
Does anybody have a quick and easy way to preserve a coyote tail? I shot another one while deer hunting yesterday and am thinking about maybe sticking a collection of tails on the wall of the tractor shed.

Question by country road. Uploaded on November 29, 2012

Answers (8)

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from buckeye wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

You need to do it as soon as possible or the fur will start to slip. Skin the tail getting off as much meat as possible. The cover the flesh side with a generous amout of either non iodized salt or borax. let it dry for several weeks. when dry remove any remaining meat. At this point it should be preserved, but it will not be soft and flexible. You will have to tan it if you want that. I am not an expert at this. There might be a better way.

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from amoor983 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

If you want to tack it to your shed, just skin it, making sure to get all the meat off the tail. Easier said than done. Use a small knife and slice lengthwise and skin down the tail as far as possible. Pull very gently. When the tail tapers down to a very small size, use a slim scissor or tail slicing tool (looks like an envelope opener) to open up the tail the rest of the way, then finish skinning. Salting the tail will preserve it longer. Buckeye is right, it doesn't take long for hair to slip.

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from Proverbs wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

There is a very simple and easy way to do this.

Use a tail stripper to remove the tail. If you don't have one, just cut through the fur around the base of the tail. Pull on the tail until it comes off, leaving the flesh and sinew attached to the bony tail structure. It you have a stripper, this will be incredibly easy. If you don't, not so much.

Place the tail on thin, verticle object to dry/cure. A vehicle radio antenna is perfect for this.

You need to do this on a freshly killed coyote for this work. If you've had one sitting around for a day or two, or even in the freezer, forget it. Using the following method has kept coyote (and squirrel, skunk and some other varmint tails) looking good for several years for me. No skinning or salt needed.

I live in a very dry place (central Arizona). Not sure if the skin/fur will do as well in a more humid place.

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from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Hi...

Yes, using a tail stripper is the way to go (sold in many trapping supply catalogs). Then slit the tail open to the end. Make sure any meat, fat or oil is removed from the skin side of the tail.

Tack the tail flat, skin side out until dry. However, if you want the tail to resume its usual 'round' shape, just use approx. two tacks at the top (wide end) and one tack at the bottom until dry. Shouldn't take long.

If you have it tanned, so much the better, as it will then be very flexible and more natural looking.

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from Conibear11 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

get a board as long as the tail and about 4 inches wide...put the tail on it and make sure you split the tail...then open the tail using tacks...it should open up and dry...then if you need to tan it th keep it even longer...make sure you remove all meat and fat from the pelt

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from Conibear11 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

get a board as long as the tail and about 4 inches wide...put the tail on it and make sure you split the tail...then open the tail using tacks...it should open up and dry...then if you need to tan it th keep it even longer...make sure you remove all meat and fat from the pelt

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Thanks, everybody. I think I'd better wait for the next one since I left this one out overnight and it might be a little old by now. I'll remember all the good tips.

Where would you get one tanned? I never thought about that.

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from DEER30 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

since you left it out, hang it in the rafters of a barn or shed where it will stay dry.

I had a fox tail that a friend shot and hung in my garage as a joke. I forgot about it and 5 weeks later found it and it was dry, stiff, but odorless.

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from buckeye wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

You need to do it as soon as possible or the fur will start to slip. Skin the tail getting off as much meat as possible. The cover the flesh side with a generous amout of either non iodized salt or borax. let it dry for several weeks. when dry remove any remaining meat. At this point it should be preserved, but it will not be soft and flexible. You will have to tan it if you want that. I am not an expert at this. There might be a better way.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from amoor983 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

If you want to tack it to your shed, just skin it, making sure to get all the meat off the tail. Easier said than done. Use a small knife and slice lengthwise and skin down the tail as far as possible. Pull very gently. When the tail tapers down to a very small size, use a slim scissor or tail slicing tool (looks like an envelope opener) to open up the tail the rest of the way, then finish skinning. Salting the tail will preserve it longer. Buckeye is right, it doesn't take long for hair to slip.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

There is a very simple and easy way to do this.

Use a tail stripper to remove the tail. If you don't have one, just cut through the fur around the base of the tail. Pull on the tail until it comes off, leaving the flesh and sinew attached to the bony tail structure. It you have a stripper, this will be incredibly easy. If you don't, not so much.

Place the tail on thin, verticle object to dry/cure. A vehicle radio antenna is perfect for this.

You need to do this on a freshly killed coyote for this work. If you've had one sitting around for a day or two, or even in the freezer, forget it. Using the following method has kept coyote (and squirrel, skunk and some other varmint tails) looking good for several years for me. No skinning or salt needed.

I live in a very dry place (central Arizona). Not sure if the skin/fur will do as well in a more humid place.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Hi...

Yes, using a tail stripper is the way to go (sold in many trapping supply catalogs). Then slit the tail open to the end. Make sure any meat, fat or oil is removed from the skin side of the tail.

Tack the tail flat, skin side out until dry. However, if you want the tail to resume its usual 'round' shape, just use approx. two tacks at the top (wide end) and one tack at the bottom until dry. Shouldn't take long.

If you have it tanned, so much the better, as it will then be very flexible and more natural looking.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Conibear11 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

get a board as long as the tail and about 4 inches wide...put the tail on it and make sure you split the tail...then open the tail using tacks...it should open up and dry...then if you need to tan it th keep it even longer...make sure you remove all meat and fat from the pelt

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Conibear11 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

get a board as long as the tail and about 4 inches wide...put the tail on it and make sure you split the tail...then open the tail using tacks...it should open up and dry...then if you need to tan it th keep it even longer...make sure you remove all meat and fat from the pelt

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Thanks, everybody. I think I'd better wait for the next one since I left this one out overnight and it might be a little old by now. I'll remember all the good tips.

Where would you get one tanned? I never thought about that.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DEER30 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

since you left it out, hang it in the rafters of a barn or shed where it will stay dry.

I had a fox tail that a friend shot and hung in my garage as a joke. I forgot about it and 5 weeks later found it and it was dry, stiff, but odorless.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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