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Q:
doing a school project on black bear relocation some are for it some are against it. this is just curiousity but if a good topic comes up i might add it to my essay so any bad experiences with black bears (not necessarily attacks realy anything like them trashing you yard or ruining crops) and two everyone that was putting in their thoughts on the wolf topic i wanted thanks again i had like 8 hours of research but the teacher said i couldnt use it because it wasnt close enough of a connetion to ct but i learned a lot so i still appreciate it thanks :) -matt reney

Question by mattreney. Uploaded on November 17, 2009

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from BioGuy wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Are you talking about re-location or re-introduction? Re-location is taking a an animal from a place where a population already exists, and moving it to another area where a population already exists. Re-introduction is taking an animal from a place where a population already exists, and moving it to an area where a population once existed in the past.

The reason I ask is because people do not tend to contest re-locations, but there is often a lot of controversy surrounding re-introductions.

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from jordjohn44 wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

I don't mind bears being relocated if they are troublesome which they can often be. I have heard countless stories of people on the fringe of small towns having their dumpsters and trash cans ramshacked. If those people don't hunt or want to hunt, the only thing to do is relocate.

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from kyle wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

If you are talking about reloaction of black bears. In WI each time a bear gets trapped for crop dammage. The first time he gets a tag with a number. Then its haul off 150+ miles and let go. If he gets trapped again in the same area he was trapped the first time he gets tagged again and relocated. If he gets trapped the 3rd time in the same area he is done. This really upsetting with my group because the DNR does this mostly a week or 2 before our kill season. Just to let you know when a bear is trapped and released it will always find its why back. We havest a bear with 2 tags that was trapped twice, hauled 100+ miles each time, we killed it about 1 mile from where it was trapped! So long story short the state is wasting your money on how how they are saying they are trapping and relocating bears!!!!

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from jeffo52284 wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

if your looking for stories about problem bears check out the story of the 11 year old who shot a problem bear in driggs, ID. there is a short post on this website but if you look up a few of the idaho news stations online you should find out more about it

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from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

relocation
and thanks guys

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from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Bioguy
i thought the same as you but there are suprisingly a lot of people saying we should learn to live with the bears in some study 17% of bears (out of about 40 something) died because of humans people dont realize even more are killed by cars and things like that. i spent my lunch on the phone with a school teacher the next state over who was nice enough to share his thoughts and experiences with during his lunch he was saying that the relocations are worth it becuase the damage they cause is more costly then the trip plus they usually dont return from what i read about 50% never are a "trouble" again and another 16% are obly a nuicence once which means only 44% are repeatidly trouble and that number could only mean as little as two troubled instinces

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from BioGuy wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

As long as you're making phone calls, why not talk to some bear biologists in different states? That's where you'll get some real valuable information. Don't forget to call Wisconsin DNR and ask about the average distance they take the bears when relocating them and report that back to us...I'm a skeptic of kyle's 150 mile story. I'm not saying it isn't true, but I am skeptical of it.

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from BioGuy wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Working in biology I have had several bear encounters, but one of the most interesting was this past summer when I was assisting with a bear trapping effort. One of the foot snares appeared to have captured a bear...but what we didn't realize is that the bear was not captured at all, it was just standing near the snare. We got about 20 yards away before we realized it was a free bear, and we also noticed it had ear tags (indicating that the bear had been captured before). We assumed that it was a nuisance bear since it did not seem to be afraid of people. We scared it away from the trap by clapping our hands and yelling at it...but it didn't go very far, maybe 15 yards. It actually turned around and false charged us! We didn't back down and kept clapping and yelling at it and eventually it started to make its way into the woods...but it didn't leave the area. It circled us at about 30 yards for 15 minutes and false charged another couple of times while we reset the trap. It was a very nerve racking experience...especially since I was the guy with the bait bucket! It wasn't a very big bear...maybe 120lbs, but a bear that big can still do some damage! Anyway, once the trap was reset, I started laying down the bait and the bear came right in to within 20 yards of me and started eating it as I was laying it out. We had other sets to check so we didn't stick around long enough to see if the bear got trapped, but when we came back later in the day all of the bait was gone, and the trap had been triggered, but it didn't catch the bear.

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from fliphuntr14 wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

a few years ago a biology professor came walking up my drive way with a collar triangulator. my brother walked with him and found the bear in the den. the professor explained they trapped this bear in michigan next to a campground in Upper michigan and they released it about 80 miles from where the den is. My grandparents own the campground behind my house kind of explains the bears pattern. the professor came back in the winter with about 2 ft of snow on the ground and couldn't find the den my brother and i knew exactly where it was.. we got $20 for finding it. they tranquillized the bear and took the collar off.. it was a very cool experience to watch.. i have pictures somewhere ill try and post them. bears in this area tare bird feeders apart and my neighbors coolers if they are left outside.

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from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

fliphuntr14s comments on the bears tearing up bird feeders is mostly what i found in newspapers doesnt seem like much of a problem but it could be costly a lot of avid bird watchers spent hundreds on a single feeder and seeing as they have many the costs could add up

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from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

bioguy
as for how far they are relocated it varies from state to state. there are occasions like kyle said where they are not brought far enough away and can find there way back flordia has limmited areas to relocate them to so they often have bears making their way back. the study i was refering to was from flordia so in most areas succesful relocations would be even better. bears will not normally travel that far i have their range written down somewhere ill find it and get back to you. i believe the reason the bear kyle is refering to returned becuase of one or multiple of these reasons; the bear could have gotten too adjusted to that easy lifestyle (its like you going from having more then you could ever want to having to work for it), bears like i said learn by observing so if its mother raised the bear in the same environment thats realy all it knows but of course a bear has instincts and are very adaptable so the reason for its return could have been the area he was placed could have had poor food supplies and the closest "sanctuary" or "bear heaven" or whatever you want to call it was the area kyle was talking about. thanks for all the ideas calling biologists ill have to look into that as for wisconsin state they might be a last resort were supposed to get info from as close as possible so im doing the new england area (im from ct) the only call i made was to mass i was only able to get the # from one of my teachers knowing him very well and finding out about his problems but any ideas on how to find out about the biologists would be appreciated

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from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

glad i picked this topic though this is actually interesting to me thank god becuase we work on it an hour and a half in school each day every day since late october and were finishing around mid-december they said very long essay

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from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Bioguy
what exactly about kyles comment that a bear came back from 150+ miles were you sceptical about? just curious because ill look it up next class and get back to you any other questions let me know. and thanks you comments, stories, and questions are getting me more and more into this

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from BioGuy wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Sorry I haven't checked this post in a while. The part I am skeptical about is not a bear coming back from 150 miles...it is about making multiple 150 mile relocations for every bear. If they are taking bears 150 miles, then it is most likely because 150 miles is the distance that is required to be traveled to have a successful relocation MOST of the time, otherwise, as kyle mentioned, it's a huge waste of time and money! Bears do not ALWAYS find their way back, some do, but several don't, which is why relocation programs still exist. I'm sure the bear he was talking about was an exception, not the rule...other than that, bears do make extensive movements over the landscape, and nuisance bears, if they do not return to where they were captured, can often become a nuisance somewhere else (which is how multiple complaints usually occur).

Other than that, you seem like you have a pretty good handle on things. Keep up the good work!

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from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

thanks a lot finally putting the rough draft together now ive definatley been learning a lot so this isnt to hard to write. and your right most bears wont return and 150+ miles is a long way to relocate a bear but it is often around that distance many times even further it is very rare to have a bear find its way back unless were going to start killing them off (which we shouldnt) relocation is the only option
take care anything you want me to find out just post it here or on another question and ill see what i can find
-matt reney

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from kyle wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I forgot to mention when they trap the bear the first time they will take it some distance away. If they trap it again they try to take it as farther way next time I have heard they released bears 150 miles away and find there way back. As someone mention the bears try their hardest to get back to their home ground. They know where the escape routes and food are so they feel more comfortable. I did not mean to say every bear finds their way back but majority do. The biggest reason for trapping bears where I bear hunt is crop damage.

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from BioGuy wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Are you talking about re-location or re-introduction? Re-location is taking a an animal from a place where a population already exists, and moving it to another area where a population already exists. Re-introduction is taking an animal from a place where a population already exists, and moving it to an area where a population once existed in the past.

The reason I ask is because people do not tend to contest re-locations, but there is often a lot of controversy surrounding re-introductions.

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from jordjohn44 wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

I don't mind bears being relocated if they are troublesome which they can often be. I have heard countless stories of people on the fringe of small towns having their dumpsters and trash cans ramshacked. If those people don't hunt or want to hunt, the only thing to do is relocate.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kyle wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

If you are talking about reloaction of black bears. In WI each time a bear gets trapped for crop dammage. The first time he gets a tag with a number. Then its haul off 150+ miles and let go. If he gets trapped again in the same area he was trapped the first time he gets tagged again and relocated. If he gets trapped the 3rd time in the same area he is done. This really upsetting with my group because the DNR does this mostly a week or 2 before our kill season. Just to let you know when a bear is trapped and released it will always find its why back. We havest a bear with 2 tags that was trapped twice, hauled 100+ miles each time, we killed it about 1 mile from where it was trapped! So long story short the state is wasting your money on how how they are saying they are trapping and relocating bears!!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jeffo52284 wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

if your looking for stories about problem bears check out the story of the 11 year old who shot a problem bear in driggs, ID. there is a short post on this website but if you look up a few of the idaho news stations online you should find out more about it

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

relocation
and thanks guys

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from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Bioguy
i thought the same as you but there are suprisingly a lot of people saying we should learn to live with the bears in some study 17% of bears (out of about 40 something) died because of humans people dont realize even more are killed by cars and things like that. i spent my lunch on the phone with a school teacher the next state over who was nice enough to share his thoughts and experiences with during his lunch he was saying that the relocations are worth it becuase the damage they cause is more costly then the trip plus they usually dont return from what i read about 50% never are a "trouble" again and another 16% are obly a nuicence once which means only 44% are repeatidly trouble and that number could only mean as little as two troubled instinces

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

As long as you're making phone calls, why not talk to some bear biologists in different states? That's where you'll get some real valuable information. Don't forget to call Wisconsin DNR and ask about the average distance they take the bears when relocating them and report that back to us...I'm a skeptic of kyle's 150 mile story. I'm not saying it isn't true, but I am skeptical of it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Working in biology I have had several bear encounters, but one of the most interesting was this past summer when I was assisting with a bear trapping effort. One of the foot snares appeared to have captured a bear...but what we didn't realize is that the bear was not captured at all, it was just standing near the snare. We got about 20 yards away before we realized it was a free bear, and we also noticed it had ear tags (indicating that the bear had been captured before). We assumed that it was a nuisance bear since it did not seem to be afraid of people. We scared it away from the trap by clapping our hands and yelling at it...but it didn't go very far, maybe 15 yards. It actually turned around and false charged us! We didn't back down and kept clapping and yelling at it and eventually it started to make its way into the woods...but it didn't leave the area. It circled us at about 30 yards for 15 minutes and false charged another couple of times while we reset the trap. It was a very nerve racking experience...especially since I was the guy with the bait bucket! It wasn't a very big bear...maybe 120lbs, but a bear that big can still do some damage! Anyway, once the trap was reset, I started laying down the bait and the bear came right in to within 20 yards of me and started eating it as I was laying it out. We had other sets to check so we didn't stick around long enough to see if the bear got trapped, but when we came back later in the day all of the bait was gone, and the trap had been triggered, but it didn't catch the bear.

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from fliphuntr14 wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

a few years ago a biology professor came walking up my drive way with a collar triangulator. my brother walked with him and found the bear in the den. the professor explained they trapped this bear in michigan next to a campground in Upper michigan and they released it about 80 miles from where the den is. My grandparents own the campground behind my house kind of explains the bears pattern. the professor came back in the winter with about 2 ft of snow on the ground and couldn't find the den my brother and i knew exactly where it was.. we got $20 for finding it. they tranquillized the bear and took the collar off.. it was a very cool experience to watch.. i have pictures somewhere ill try and post them. bears in this area tare bird feeders apart and my neighbors coolers if they are left outside.

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from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

fliphuntr14s comments on the bears tearing up bird feeders is mostly what i found in newspapers doesnt seem like much of a problem but it could be costly a lot of avid bird watchers spent hundreds on a single feeder and seeing as they have many the costs could add up

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

bioguy
as for how far they are relocated it varies from state to state. there are occasions like kyle said where they are not brought far enough away and can find there way back flordia has limmited areas to relocate them to so they often have bears making their way back. the study i was refering to was from flordia so in most areas succesful relocations would be even better. bears will not normally travel that far i have their range written down somewhere ill find it and get back to you. i believe the reason the bear kyle is refering to returned becuase of one or multiple of these reasons; the bear could have gotten too adjusted to that easy lifestyle (its like you going from having more then you could ever want to having to work for it), bears like i said learn by observing so if its mother raised the bear in the same environment thats realy all it knows but of course a bear has instincts and are very adaptable so the reason for its return could have been the area he was placed could have had poor food supplies and the closest "sanctuary" or "bear heaven" or whatever you want to call it was the area kyle was talking about. thanks for all the ideas calling biologists ill have to look into that as for wisconsin state they might be a last resort were supposed to get info from as close as possible so im doing the new england area (im from ct) the only call i made was to mass i was only able to get the # from one of my teachers knowing him very well and finding out about his problems but any ideas on how to find out about the biologists would be appreciated

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

glad i picked this topic though this is actually interesting to me thank god becuase we work on it an hour and a half in school each day every day since late october and were finishing around mid-december they said very long essay

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Bioguy
what exactly about kyles comment that a bear came back from 150+ miles were you sceptical about? just curious because ill look it up next class and get back to you any other questions let me know. and thanks you comments, stories, and questions are getting me more and more into this

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Sorry I haven't checked this post in a while. The part I am skeptical about is not a bear coming back from 150 miles...it is about making multiple 150 mile relocations for every bear. If they are taking bears 150 miles, then it is most likely because 150 miles is the distance that is required to be traveled to have a successful relocation MOST of the time, otherwise, as kyle mentioned, it's a huge waste of time and money! Bears do not ALWAYS find their way back, some do, but several don't, which is why relocation programs still exist. I'm sure the bear he was talking about was an exception, not the rule...other than that, bears do make extensive movements over the landscape, and nuisance bears, if they do not return to where they were captured, can often become a nuisance somewhere else (which is how multiple complaints usually occur).

Other than that, you seem like you have a pretty good handle on things. Keep up the good work!

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from mattreney wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

thanks a lot finally putting the rough draft together now ive definatley been learning a lot so this isnt to hard to write. and your right most bears wont return and 150+ miles is a long way to relocate a bear but it is often around that distance many times even further it is very rare to have a bear find its way back unless were going to start killing them off (which we shouldnt) relocation is the only option
take care anything you want me to find out just post it here or on another question and ill see what i can find
-matt reney

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from kyle wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I forgot to mention when they trap the bear the first time they will take it some distance away. If they trap it again they try to take it as farther way next time I have heard they released bears 150 miles away and find there way back. As someone mention the bears try their hardest to get back to their home ground. They know where the escape routes and food are so they feel more comfortable. I did not mean to say every bear finds their way back but majority do. The biggest reason for trapping bears where I bear hunt is crop damage.

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