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Q:
how common is it for a doe to have twin fawns? the other day i saw a doe in my backyard with two fawns both feeding off their mother at the same time. and another day i was driving down my road and these two spotted fawns were running down the road in front of our car as if we were trying to run them over.

Question by Reid Jones. Uploaded on July 20, 2009

Answers (14)

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from huntcamp wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

That is very common, more common in a lot of parts than a doe just having one. Most ratio's that I have found are 1.7 fawns per doe a year.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Very common with mule deer.

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from NYhunter wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

For whitetails it's very common, In my hunting spot there are allmost allways double or twin fawns.

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from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

I say it's very common for a doe to have twin fawns!!!!!!!!

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from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

These guys are all right. It's actually more common to have twins than a single. A young doe may have only one and when the food is scarce does may have only one. Natures way!

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from shane wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

If you are seeing a lot of singles, there are too many deer. Twins is the norm, I've seen more triplets than I can count, and I used see at least one set of 4 every year.

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from AndyH wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

I don't know how common it is, I do see it alot with whitetails here in Arkansas. I've seen several sets of twins every year. I don't recall ever seening any triplets.

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from Del in KS wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Twins are actually more common than singles or triplets.

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Common in areas where the does are well-nourished and not under stress.

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from KMB33 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Twins are actually conceived over 50 percent of the time it just depends on if they both live or not.

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

As stated by most of these guys, twins are the norm in a healthy herd.

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from MB915 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Would have to agree with the other users, it is very common to have twins. But the catch is, depending on where you live the survival rate for the fawns can vary drastically. So while the does in your area may be having twins, you may never see a lot of sets of twins due to predadation. Its a rough world for a deer, then add in the fact that the fawns cant run from danager but just hide. Makes them an easy prey for bears, coyotes, and wolves.

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from GiantWhitetails wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

mostly all i see is twin fawns

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from Hunter Savage wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

it is a very common . i got to watch a set run and play today , at work cute little farts

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from huntcamp wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

That is very common, more common in a lot of parts than a doe just having one. Most ratio's that I have found are 1.7 fawns per doe a year.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

These guys are all right. It's actually more common to have twins than a single. A young doe may have only one and when the food is scarce does may have only one. Natures way!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

If you are seeing a lot of singles, there are too many deer. Twins is the norm, I've seen more triplets than I can count, and I used see at least one set of 4 every year.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Twins are actually more common than singles or triplets.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Common in areas where the does are well-nourished and not under stress.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from KMB33 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Twins are actually conceived over 50 percent of the time it just depends on if they both live or not.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

As stated by most of these guys, twins are the norm in a healthy herd.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MB915 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Would have to agree with the other users, it is very common to have twins. But the catch is, depending on where you live the survival rate for the fawns can vary drastically. So while the does in your area may be having twins, you may never see a lot of sets of twins due to predadation. Its a rough world for a deer, then add in the fact that the fawns cant run from danager but just hide. Makes them an easy prey for bears, coyotes, and wolves.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from GiantWhitetails wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

mostly all i see is twin fawns

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunter Savage wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

it is a very common . i got to watch a set run and play today , at work cute little farts

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Very common with mule deer.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NYhunter wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

For whitetails it's very common, In my hunting spot there are allmost allways double or twin fawns.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

I say it's very common for a doe to have twin fawns!!!!!!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from AndyH wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

I don't know how common it is, I do see it alot with whitetails here in Arkansas. I've seen several sets of twins every year. I don't recall ever seening any triplets.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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