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Q:
Is it safe to eat rare venison steak same way as beef? sounds risky after reading about CWD and how to handle venison safely in hunting regulations.

Question by hunterD. Uploaded on December 18, 2009

Answers (18)

Top Rated
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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

Have it tested, but I am told if you cook it thoroughly
it is safe, if in doubt ask a vet.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from northernmndeerhunter wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

As a health care professional, I would not recommend eating any type of meat too rare. The risk of salmonella is not worth the risk in my opinion.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from northernmndeerhunter wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

not worth going through treatment...sorry can't type :)

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

Mmmmmm. Venison Sushi!!! tasty, no really read.

The price of tuna is now so high that Japanese sushi chefs are considering making their dish with raw horse meat and cuts of smoked deer instead of the traditional tuna.

http://www.spectator.co.uk/coffeehouse/32894/anyone-for-venison-sushi.th...

http://sushifaq.com/sushiotaku/2007/06/27/venison-sushi-oh-deer/comment-...

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I'll pass on RAW anything!

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from stephensfamily@... wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I just watched the other night on the food network a chef made venison tar-tar. The Judges thought it was a wonderfull idea and they say it was a good dish. But like Moishe I think I'll pass.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from stephensfamily@... wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I am personally not to worried about CWD. I have been eating venison for over 30 years and look no problems with me. The "experts" say there is no risk to humans. By the same token I still cook mine at least medium

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

See my profile pics. I eat it med-rare(some may consider it rare) and always will. We don't have CWD where i hunt, but i don't believe you can cook that out anyway. Then again, i'll eat Sushi while we're cleaning the tuna, still on the boat.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

northernmndeerhunter is right and may I add about the other biocritters in it!

Cooked to a center very light pink is OK!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I grew up eating sushi and raw oysters - still love them. Have always preferred meat rare, medium rare, or tartare, and eat eggs sunny side up, over easy, or raw, mixed with soy sauce. Spent 4 days in the hospital for severe food poisoning. Another severe episode kept me incapacitated for the first few days of an elk hunt. But not for the above foods - once from a meal at a culinary institute (where top notch chefs are trained) and another from a prepared takeout meal from an upscale market. Nasty stuff food poisoning ... can kill you. But I love to eat and may never learn.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jestr1 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I like to cook my steaks fast and hot crispy on the outside with a nice reddish pink middle! I like it rare but not raw. I always cook all my game the same I cook my steaks. Except bear I cook them a bit more due to their eating habits!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I have always cooked my venison well done but like my beef rare.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

buckhunter, you should come over to the dark side. If you like your beef rare, venison backstraps and tenderloins are way better that way.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I spent a lot of time studying CWD...there isn't much that can destroy the prions that cause it. They seem pretty resiliant to very high temperatures, so I doubt cooking, even if cooked very thoroughly, would destroy them. They are not a virus or a bacteria, but a malformed protein. So for example, the meat you cook is also a protein, and cooking it does not destory it. It makes it safe from most pathogens, but it does not completely destroy the muscle proteins that the meat is composed of. If you live in CWD areas, get your harvested animal tested before consuming. If not, then try to adhere to the following with venison:

Steaks - Most pathogens are located on the surface of the meat. Enjoy rare, medium, or well done, whatever your preference.

Backstraps & tenderloins - Same as steaks. (I'm with you on that one steve182!)

Ground meat - Cook thoroughly. Ground meat has more surface area, and can come into contact with pathogens during the grinding prcess, which can become stored in the middle of the meat. I generally tend to use ground meat in sauces and soups. Mix some beef or pork fat in with burgers to keep them juicy, and cook until the middle reaches about 160 degrees F.

Roasts - Again, most pathogens are on the surface. Sear the outside, and then roast until the desired rareness is attained.

Heart & Liver - cook very thoroughly if you choose to consume them!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

Bioguy, that's good advice. I agree with you about cooking ground meat more thoroughly. As i understand, CWD prions would be present in brain and spinal tissue? but not in a ham or flank, correct? There's reason enough to not take that risky spine or neck shot and shoot through the lungs, right? Just one guys opinion

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

You're right steve182, a majority of the prions can be found present in the brain and spinal tissue, but they are also present in the lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are located in several places throughout the body and look like tiny beans. If you don't know what you're looking for, they can easilly be stuck in with the grinding meat. There's some really good information at: http://www.cwd-info.org/index.php/fuseaction/recommendations.questionsso feel free to check it out!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sourdough Dave wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

I like all my meat a little pink. Wild meat cooked well is a bit tough for my taste. But then, I hunt in an area that so far is free of CWD.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sammy Baez wrote 1 year 16 weeks ago

anybody please answer

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from northernmndeerhunter wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

As a health care professional, I would not recommend eating any type of meat too rare. The risk of salmonella is not worth the risk in my opinion.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I grew up eating sushi and raw oysters - still love them. Have always preferred meat rare, medium rare, or tartare, and eat eggs sunny side up, over easy, or raw, mixed with soy sauce. Spent 4 days in the hospital for severe food poisoning. Another severe episode kept me incapacitated for the first few days of an elk hunt. But not for the above foods - once from a meal at a culinary institute (where top notch chefs are trained) and another from a prepared takeout meal from an upscale market. Nasty stuff food poisoning ... can kill you. But I love to eat and may never learn.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I have always cooked my venison well done but like my beef rare.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from stephensfamily@... wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I just watched the other night on the food network a chef made venison tar-tar. The Judges thought it was a wonderfull idea and they say it was a good dish. But like Moishe I think I'll pass.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from stephensfamily@... wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I am personally not to worried about CWD. I have been eating venison for over 30 years and look no problems with me. The "experts" say there is no risk to humans. By the same token I still cook mine at least medium

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

Mmmmmm. Venison Sushi!!! tasty, no really read.

The price of tuna is now so high that Japanese sushi chefs are considering making their dish with raw horse meat and cuts of smoked deer instead of the traditional tuna.

http://www.spectator.co.uk/coffeehouse/32894/anyone-for-venison-sushi.th...

http://sushifaq.com/sushiotaku/2007/06/27/venison-sushi-oh-deer/comment-...

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jestr1 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I like to cook my steaks fast and hot crispy on the outside with a nice reddish pink middle! I like it rare but not raw. I always cook all my game the same I cook my steaks. Except bear I cook them a bit more due to their eating habits!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from northernmndeerhunter wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

not worth going through treatment...sorry can't type :)

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

northernmndeerhunter is right and may I add about the other biocritters in it!

Cooked to a center very light pink is OK!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

See my profile pics. I eat it med-rare(some may consider it rare) and always will. We don't have CWD where i hunt, but i don't believe you can cook that out anyway. Then again, i'll eat Sushi while we're cleaning the tuna, still on the boat.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

buckhunter, you should come over to the dark side. If you like your beef rare, venison backstraps and tenderloins are way better that way.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

Bioguy, that's good advice. I agree with you about cooking ground meat more thoroughly. As i understand, CWD prions would be present in brain and spinal tissue? but not in a ham or flank, correct? There's reason enough to not take that risky spine or neck shot and shoot through the lungs, right? Just one guys opinion

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I spent a lot of time studying CWD...there isn't much that can destroy the prions that cause it. They seem pretty resiliant to very high temperatures, so I doubt cooking, even if cooked very thoroughly, would destroy them. They are not a virus or a bacteria, but a malformed protein. So for example, the meat you cook is also a protein, and cooking it does not destory it. It makes it safe from most pathogens, but it does not completely destroy the muscle proteins that the meat is composed of. If you live in CWD areas, get your harvested animal tested before consuming. If not, then try to adhere to the following with venison:

Steaks - Most pathogens are located on the surface of the meat. Enjoy rare, medium, or well done, whatever your preference.

Backstraps & tenderloins - Same as steaks. (I'm with you on that one steve182!)

Ground meat - Cook thoroughly. Ground meat has more surface area, and can come into contact with pathogens during the grinding prcess, which can become stored in the middle of the meat. I generally tend to use ground meat in sauces and soups. Mix some beef or pork fat in with burgers to keep them juicy, and cook until the middle reaches about 160 degrees F.

Roasts - Again, most pathogens are on the surface. Sear the outside, and then roast until the desired rareness is attained.

Heart & Liver - cook very thoroughly if you choose to consume them!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

Have it tested, but I am told if you cook it thoroughly
it is safe, if in doubt ask a vet.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I'll pass on RAW anything!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

You're right steve182, a majority of the prions can be found present in the brain and spinal tissue, but they are also present in the lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are located in several places throughout the body and look like tiny beans. If you don't know what you're looking for, they can easilly be stuck in with the grinding meat. There's some really good information at: http://www.cwd-info.org/index.php/fuseaction/recommendations.questionsso feel free to check it out!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sourdough Dave wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

I like all my meat a little pink. Wild meat cooked well is a bit tough for my taste. But then, I hunt in an area that so far is free of CWD.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sammy Baez wrote 1 year 16 weeks ago

anybody please answer

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer