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Q:
AS many of you agree that animals can some how know that there is front coming in(cold front, alot snow coming) How soon before do they know the weater is changing? 12 hours, 24 hours, 36 hours? Also can they some how tell how long its going to last? Like if its going to a quick snow storm or a 3 day billzard? And if so how does the body responese to let the animals know go feed heavy and find shelter.

Question by kyle. Uploaded on December 14, 2009

Answers (8)

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from squirrelgirl wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

i know when it's gonna rain during the day because my terriers won't leave the bed in the morning if it's supposed to rain that day. they also predict earthquakes.

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from Bryan01 wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

It's my understanding that they can sense the change in barometric pressure that precedes the change in weather - if this is right, the lead time will depend on how quickly the weather system is moving.

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from shane wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

As far as I can tell for sure, they know about 24 hours ahead of time. They do seem to have some idea how bad or long the storm will be, too. It's all about barometric pressure changes and being more tuned in to things than we could ever be.

One thing I'll say is that the research will always sell wild animals short. Their abilities are always underestimated. Whether it's their physical abilities, sensory, or mental, I think they are all capable of beyond what scientists or people in general think.

I don't know if anyone noticed, but the "top speed" of the cheetah has gone up steadily over the years. The top speed of whitetails is usually listed at 35. Bullfeathers!

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from cody r wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

when the barometer is dropping or rising animals can sense it

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from huntnow wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

there are dogs that smell cancer so being able to predict weather changes is really not all that evolved in the animal world. i think that we are still light years away from knowing what animals are really capable of.

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

I can tell when a storm is coming too, based on my aches and pains, but deer and other game have an uncanny almost "sixth sense" in this regard.

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from BioGuy wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Great question! The simplest answer is, "The animals that feed and seek shelter in response to sensing an incoming storm survive and reproduce better than those who do not." In this manner, the behavior is reinforced, and passed on to the next generation. The stimuli may include: changes in temperature, changes in barometric pressure, changes in humidity, and changes in wind speed and direction.

People who spend a lot of time outside have a knack for predicting the weather as well, but they can't usually put an exact timeframe on their prediction. I imagine the same is true with animals because there are so many different variables involved.

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from Kenton wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Barometric pressure seems to be the key... Not only effects quadrupeds but fish too. Some of the best fishing is when a front is coming in and barometer is dropping...

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from Bryan01 wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

It's my understanding that they can sense the change in barometric pressure that precedes the change in weather - if this is right, the lead time will depend on how quickly the weather system is moving.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntnow wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

there are dogs that smell cancer so being able to predict weather changes is really not all that evolved in the animal world. i think that we are still light years away from knowing what animals are really capable of.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from squirrelgirl wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

i know when it's gonna rain during the day because my terriers won't leave the bed in the morning if it's supposed to rain that day. they also predict earthquakes.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

As far as I can tell for sure, they know about 24 hours ahead of time. They do seem to have some idea how bad or long the storm will be, too. It's all about barometric pressure changes and being more tuned in to things than we could ever be.

One thing I'll say is that the research will always sell wild animals short. Their abilities are always underestimated. Whether it's their physical abilities, sensory, or mental, I think they are all capable of beyond what scientists or people in general think.

I don't know if anyone noticed, but the "top speed" of the cheetah has gone up steadily over the years. The top speed of whitetails is usually listed at 35. Bullfeathers!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cody r wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

when the barometer is dropping or rising animals can sense it

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Great question! The simplest answer is, "The animals that feed and seek shelter in response to sensing an incoming storm survive and reproduce better than those who do not." In this manner, the behavior is reinforced, and passed on to the next generation. The stimuli may include: changes in temperature, changes in barometric pressure, changes in humidity, and changes in wind speed and direction.

People who spend a lot of time outside have a knack for predicting the weather as well, but they can't usually put an exact timeframe on their prediction. I imagine the same is true with animals because there are so many different variables involved.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kenton wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Barometric pressure seems to be the key... Not only effects quadrupeds but fish too. Some of the best fishing is when a front is coming in and barometer is dropping...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

I can tell when a storm is coming too, based on my aches and pains, but deer and other game have an uncanny almost "sixth sense" in this regard.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer