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Q:
There is a hawk in my backyard who is attacking and eating my chickens. I am going to kill it to protect my family's supply of eggs. I do not want to waste it. How do I preserve the skin?

Question by fishandhuntboy. Uploaded on December 06, 2011

Answers (30)

Top Rated
All Answers
from PigHunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Check your local laws. It could be very illegal to kill that hawk. Giving that, you may need to find another way to protect the chickens. Any saved portion of an illegal kill could be used as evidence against you.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Ditto~PigHunter
Take some PIX and call your local Game Warden let him do his JOB!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from bass bomber wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

1) Stuff paper towel into the mouth and deep into the throat of the bird.
2) Wrap 3 - 4 paper towels around the head and neck of the bird.
3) Carefully tuck the head and neck under the wing being careful to keep blood off of the feathers.
4) Wrap the bird in several layers of newspaper using the masking tape to keep it in place.

Now place the bird in a paper bag for transport home. Once home, replace the outer layer of newspaper with a lightly damp terrycloth towel. Place into a plastic bag, seal and place the bird in the freezer. Follow these additional helpful hints to keep your trophy in good condition for the Taxidermist.

Always choose a trophy that is in good shape. Even though the bird may be one-of-a-kind, if it is blown to pieces you can't expect to receive a perfect mount upon completion.
After harvesting, keep the bird in a cool as possible environment. Keep out of direct sunlight and warmth.

Never attempt to skin the bird or remove the entrails.
If possible, wipe off any additional fresh blood from the bird. Water works well for this. Don't worry about getting the feathers wet but don't over-do-it either.
Never place a fresh bird into a plastic bag without following the steps above first.
It is possible to save the meat for later consumption provided the bird has been kept cool and frozen quickly, however, it is not advisable.
Get the bird to the Taxidermist as quickly as possible after freezing. Birds will keep for up to 6 months frozen but quality may suffer if kept frozen for an extended period of time.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chaslee wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

protected. Better check with a conservation officer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from whitetailfreek wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

A hawk is a bird of prey. They are federally protected. More than likely, even in your scenario, it is flat out illegal for you to kill the hawk.

Like others have said, call a game warden, or game commissioner.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Protected under the same Federal law as the Bald Eagle, you better contact your local Conservation Officer about how to get rid of the bird. Don't do something stupid that can cost you lots of money and a record.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Here in GA theres a law and if a hawk or bird of prey is killing livestock you can shoot it but you have to dispose the body by burying it and i guess maybe burning it but I would check your states laws first or call your conservation officer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from labrador12 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

The taxidermist may blow you in as otherwise he may get charged as well. I suggest the 3 s's, shoot, shovel, and shut up. Once a predator keys on your birds its extremely difficult to convince them to leave without making massive changes to the way you keep your birds. This will happen again and again. Consider ways to protect your chickens by not making them obvious to predators. Otherwise, you will be killing hawks and owls on a regular basis.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Sarge has got it...Hawks are FEDERALLY protected...in other words, it don't matter what state you live in, it's against the law (sorry Ga hunter). The law that GA hunter is referring to applies to non-federally protected animals (coyotes, bears, foxes, etc.) and most states have a similar law.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Install a mesh screen over the chicken pen or place crow decoys close to the area.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Labrador 12 nailed it SSS,,,,

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuckles wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Killing the hawk, aside from being illegal, is not a long term solution to your problem. Figure out how to protect your chickens with some sort of structure or netting. That will keep you out of trouble with the law and protect your chickens from all hawks, not just the one you are dealing with right now.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Chuckles and buckhunter have the right of it. Forget about killing the hawk and protect your chickens.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Bioguy thats strange a man I know contacted DNR and asked them what to do and thats exactly what they told him to do. I wouldnt kill a hawk though even if I could though.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from lovetohunt wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

If you want a job done right sometimes you gotta do it yourself.

I know I will get bashed for it, but as others said, shoot, shovel, ans shut up.

A 22lr wont draw much noise...

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from lovetohunt wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

In the words of Uncle Ted: Id rather see dead offenders then second offernders!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Logan88 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Maybe stick an owl decoy around the presence of another raptor may do the trick, however blasting a federally protected bird is not the answer. Find a way to protect the chickens and leave the hawk to feed on small rodents that dine on chicken feed.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Ditto to Sarge,Pighunter,Bioguy and a host of others. Hawks,Falcons,Owls,Eagles and most any other bird of pray are all FEDERALLY PROTECTED. Even Obama can't hurt or capture them .Even having parts is illegal. No matter where you reside or live. best way to go to jail and pay big fines is to shoot one. Might as well be robbing a carryout. If somebody told you that anyone from the DNR told them they could shoot any of the listed birds,they are complete and utterly lying through what teeth they still have in their face. "NOT GONNA HAPPEN" not even in WV

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

And the last 'S' is most important.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

True story: in about 1988 I was mule deer hunting on a ranch in Colorado. The rancher was with me that day and on our way back down the mountain, a golden eagle hit a red angus calf, broke it's back and began to pull hide off and dine before the calf was dead. The rancher stopped the truck, very calmly laid a vintage m/70 in .270 across the hood and killed the raptor at about 350 yard. He got back in the truck and I didn't know what to say, but I finally stammered, "that's not legal". His reply, "Neither is killing my calves." I figured I probably shouldn't offer anymore advice.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

RES1956

True story. I was hunting in Montana a few years ago and saw an animal standing in a pasture. As I got closer, I saw that it was a big golden eagle. They are quite a bit larger than the bald eagle variety. During supper back at the house I told Kenny and Donna about the big eagle that I had seen. The first thing out of Donna's mouth was "Did you shoot it?" When I said that I did not, Kenny said "Why not?" Then it was relayed how many lambs and calves are taken by them. I fall back on the words of wisdom from a family lawyer from Russelville: "A vahmit is anything what will kill yore chickens." I protect my omelette source. Nuff said.

WAM

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jakenbake wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Ugh. It amazes me that people who purport to care about the outdoors and call themselves "sportsmen" would advocate killing raptors. If your chickens or calves or whatever are getting killed by raptors, it's your own GD fault for growing those animals there or not better protecting them. 6 BILLION chickens are killed every year for food. One chicken's life isn't worth a raptor's life. It's not like the country is overrun with top-line predator birds. There's a REASON they're federally protected.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from lovetohunt wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

jakenbake

You crack me up!

Some people make a living raising cows and chickens so your a$$ can eat dinner every night.

And I do not discriminate among different kinds of animals. A chicken is egual to a raptor in my mind. Myabe the chicken isnt as "cool", but if it were me I would be giving this hawk a load of 3" Winchester Blind side in BB!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

LMAO!

Jakenbake, I don't have 6 billion chickens. If I did, I would not mind the hawks picking a few. I've got more hawks, eagles, and owls around here than Carter's has Little Pills, so I have not idea why they are protected. I have not killed any raptors yet, nor have they killed my chickens to my knowledge.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fishandhuntboy wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Thanks to most of you who informed me that it is illegal and gave me some good ideas/advice. You've been a huge help. Others of you like jakenbake should grow up and answer the question. If you aren't going to do anything but trash me because I was unaware of a law, there is no use even posting the answer.Once again, thanks to the rest of you

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Ga hunter - Don't trust what you hear from people unless you heard it from the horse's mouth yourself. Call a conservation officer in GA and find out. I rarely trust what people tell me without looking up the information to make sure it is correct. In addition...federal laws have changed over the years, so what you said might be true...it just depends on when it was said. For example, at one time here in PA, it was perfectly legal to shoot raptors...not only was it legal, but they had a bounty! Now they are federally protected, and federal law supersedes state and local law (except when it comes to firearms it seems).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

The only reason I trusted the guy is cause I know him well he's a longtime family friend and a retired youth pastor so I trusted him when he told me that. I will look into it though.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

is it against the law, yes, but is one hawk worth all of your chickens? thats something you will have to ask yourself. another vote for SSS.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Scratchgolf - If the chickens are that valuable, then it's worth investing some money to protect them. Killing the hawk doesn't solve the problem...the problem is that the hawk has access to the chickens. Chickens are easy prey for raptors (and just about any other predator), and although the initial investment to keep them properly protected might be high, it's an investment that keeps you out of jail, and it's a more permanent solution.

I dabble in nuisance wildlife control...the best thing the guy can do is install a fence and bury it 6in. into the ground along the sides and put fencing on top to keep raptors out. Either you do that, or constantly battle with predators of all types (raptors, raccoons, foxes, coyotes, domestic cats, dogs, etc.).

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Denise Raymond wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

That federal law is a crock. A hawk killed my kitten in my own yard yesterday. I can't even let any small animal out on my own property so that a non tax paying piece of crap bird may dine for free? I don't think so! The feds can screw themselves as far as I am concerned. If I get a chance mr hawk will not have another opportunity to kill any more of my pets. Let the bleeding hearts that want to save these birds live with the heartbreak I am right now. Let all the hawks go live in their yard so that they have to remained shuttered in the house instead of being able to enjoy the outdoors.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from Treestand wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Ditto~PigHunter
Take some PIX and call your local Game Warden let him do his JOB!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Protected under the same Federal law as the Bald Eagle, you better contact your local Conservation Officer about how to get rid of the bird. Don't do something stupid that can cost you lots of money and a record.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from PigHunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Check your local laws. It could be very illegal to kill that hawk. Giving that, you may need to find another way to protect the chickens. Any saved portion of an illegal kill could be used as evidence against you.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from whitetailfreek wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

A hawk is a bird of prey. They are federally protected. More than likely, even in your scenario, it is flat out illegal for you to kill the hawk.

Like others have said, call a game warden, or game commissioner.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Install a mesh screen over the chicken pen or place crow decoys close to the area.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Ditto to Sarge,Pighunter,Bioguy and a host of others. Hawks,Falcons,Owls,Eagles and most any other bird of pray are all FEDERALLY PROTECTED. Even Obama can't hurt or capture them .Even having parts is illegal. No matter where you reside or live. best way to go to jail and pay big fines is to shoot one. Might as well be robbing a carryout. If somebody told you that anyone from the DNR told them they could shoot any of the listed birds,they are complete and utterly lying through what teeth they still have in their face. "NOT GONNA HAPPEN" not even in WV

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

And the last 'S' is most important.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Sarge has got it...Hawks are FEDERALLY protected...in other words, it don't matter what state you live in, it's against the law (sorry Ga hunter). The law that GA hunter is referring to applies to non-federally protected animals (coyotes, bears, foxes, etc.) and most states have a similar law.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuckles wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Killing the hawk, aside from being illegal, is not a long term solution to your problem. Figure out how to protect your chickens with some sort of structure or netting. That will keep you out of trouble with the law and protect your chickens from all hawks, not just the one you are dealing with right now.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

True story: in about 1988 I was mule deer hunting on a ranch in Colorado. The rancher was with me that day and on our way back down the mountain, a golden eagle hit a red angus calf, broke it's back and began to pull hide off and dine before the calf was dead. The rancher stopped the truck, very calmly laid a vintage m/70 in .270 across the hood and killed the raptor at about 350 yard. He got back in the truck and I didn't know what to say, but I finally stammered, "that's not legal". His reply, "Neither is killing my calves." I figured I probably shouldn't offer anymore advice.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from fishandhuntboy wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Thanks to most of you who informed me that it is illegal and gave me some good ideas/advice. You've been a huge help. Others of you like jakenbake should grow up and answer the question. If you aren't going to do anything but trash me because I was unaware of a law, there is no use even posting the answer.Once again, thanks to the rest of you

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Scratchgolf - If the chickens are that valuable, then it's worth investing some money to protect them. Killing the hawk doesn't solve the problem...the problem is that the hawk has access to the chickens. Chickens are easy prey for raptors (and just about any other predator), and although the initial investment to keep them properly protected might be high, it's an investment that keeps you out of jail, and it's a more permanent solution.

I dabble in nuisance wildlife control...the best thing the guy can do is install a fence and bury it 6in. into the ground along the sides and put fencing on top to keep raptors out. Either you do that, or constantly battle with predators of all types (raptors, raccoons, foxes, coyotes, domestic cats, dogs, etc.).

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chaslee wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

protected. Better check with a conservation officer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Here in GA theres a law and if a hawk or bird of prey is killing livestock you can shoot it but you have to dispose the body by burying it and i guess maybe burning it but I would check your states laws first or call your conservation officer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Labrador 12 nailed it SSS,,,,

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Chuckles and buckhunter have the right of it. Forget about killing the hawk and protect your chickens.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Bioguy thats strange a man I know contacted DNR and asked them what to do and thats exactly what they told him to do. I wouldnt kill a hawk though even if I could though.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Logan88 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Maybe stick an owl decoy around the presence of another raptor may do the trick, however blasting a federally protected bird is not the answer. Find a way to protect the chickens and leave the hawk to feed on small rodents that dine on chicken feed.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jakenbake wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Ugh. It amazes me that people who purport to care about the outdoors and call themselves "sportsmen" would advocate killing raptors. If your chickens or calves or whatever are getting killed by raptors, it's your own GD fault for growing those animals there or not better protecting them. 6 BILLION chickens are killed every year for food. One chicken's life isn't worth a raptor's life. It's not like the country is overrun with top-line predator birds. There's a REASON they're federally protected.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

LMAO!

Jakenbake, I don't have 6 billion chickens. If I did, I would not mind the hawks picking a few. I've got more hawks, eagles, and owls around here than Carter's has Little Pills, so I have not idea why they are protected. I have not killed any raptors yet, nor have they killed my chickens to my knowledge.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Ga hunter - Don't trust what you hear from people unless you heard it from the horse's mouth yourself. Call a conservation officer in GA and find out. I rarely trust what people tell me without looking up the information to make sure it is correct. In addition...federal laws have changed over the years, so what you said might be true...it just depends on when it was said. For example, at one time here in PA, it was perfectly legal to shoot raptors...not only was it legal, but they had a bounty! Now they are federally protected, and federal law supersedes state and local law (except when it comes to firearms it seems).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

The only reason I trusted the guy is cause I know him well he's a longtime family friend and a retired youth pastor so I trusted him when he told me that. I will look into it though.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

is it against the law, yes, but is one hawk worth all of your chickens? thats something you will have to ask yourself. another vote for SSS.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bass bomber wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

1) Stuff paper towel into the mouth and deep into the throat of the bird.
2) Wrap 3 - 4 paper towels around the head and neck of the bird.
3) Carefully tuck the head and neck under the wing being careful to keep blood off of the feathers.
4) Wrap the bird in several layers of newspaper using the masking tape to keep it in place.

Now place the bird in a paper bag for transport home. Once home, replace the outer layer of newspaper with a lightly damp terrycloth towel. Place into a plastic bag, seal and place the bird in the freezer. Follow these additional helpful hints to keep your trophy in good condition for the Taxidermist.

Always choose a trophy that is in good shape. Even though the bird may be one-of-a-kind, if it is blown to pieces you can't expect to receive a perfect mount upon completion.
After harvesting, keep the bird in a cool as possible environment. Keep out of direct sunlight and warmth.

Never attempt to skin the bird or remove the entrails.
If possible, wipe off any additional fresh blood from the bird. Water works well for this. Don't worry about getting the feathers wet but don't over-do-it either.
Never place a fresh bird into a plastic bag without following the steps above first.
It is possible to save the meat for later consumption provided the bird has been kept cool and frozen quickly, however, it is not advisable.
Get the bird to the Taxidermist as quickly as possible after freezing. Birds will keep for up to 6 months frozen but quality may suffer if kept frozen for an extended period of time.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from labrador12 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

The taxidermist may blow you in as otherwise he may get charged as well. I suggest the 3 s's, shoot, shovel, and shut up. Once a predator keys on your birds its extremely difficult to convince them to leave without making massive changes to the way you keep your birds. This will happen again and again. Consider ways to protect your chickens by not making them obvious to predators. Otherwise, you will be killing hawks and owls on a regular basis.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from lovetohunt wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

If you want a job done right sometimes you gotta do it yourself.

I know I will get bashed for it, but as others said, shoot, shovel, ans shut up.

A 22lr wont draw much noise...

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from lovetohunt wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

In the words of Uncle Ted: Id rather see dead offenders then second offernders!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from lovetohunt wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

jakenbake

You crack me up!

Some people make a living raising cows and chickens so your a$$ can eat dinner every night.

And I do not discriminate among different kinds of animals. A chicken is egual to a raptor in my mind. Myabe the chicken isnt as "cool", but if it were me I would be giving this hawk a load of 3" Winchester Blind side in BB!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Denise Raymond wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

That federal law is a crock. A hawk killed my kitten in my own yard yesterday. I can't even let any small animal out on my own property so that a non tax paying piece of crap bird may dine for free? I don't think so! The feds can screw themselves as far as I am concerned. If I get a chance mr hawk will not have another opportunity to kill any more of my pets. Let the bleeding hearts that want to save these birds live with the heartbreak I am right now. Let all the hawks go live in their yard so that they have to remained shuttered in the house instead of being able to enjoy the outdoors.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

RES1956

True story. I was hunting in Montana a few years ago and saw an animal standing in a pasture. As I got closer, I saw that it was a big golden eagle. They are quite a bit larger than the bald eagle variety. During supper back at the house I told Kenny and Donna about the big eagle that I had seen. The first thing out of Donna's mouth was "Did you shoot it?" When I said that I did not, Kenny said "Why not?" Then it was relayed how many lambs and calves are taken by them. I fall back on the words of wisdom from a family lawyer from Russelville: "A vahmit is anything what will kill yore chickens." I protect my omelette source. Nuff said.

WAM

-2 Good Comment? | | Report

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