Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

AnswersASK YOUR QUESTION

Answers

Q:
What's the best way to make a quick, easy, and cheap food plot? The terrain is fairly steep with very few flat spots,and doesn't get much sun because of trees.

Question by GunNut. Uploaded on July 25, 2010

Answers (5)

Top Rated
All Answers
from country road wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Beekeeper gave a good recommendation for a pre-mix seed combo that worked well in shade a few days ago. I don't remember what it was, but you might use the search bar on this answers page to pull it up.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Instead of pouring money into a food plot in an area of ground that's tough to grow a food plot, you may want to consider some other less expensive and equally produtive options. Timber Stand Improvement (TSI), browse cuts, creating edge, creating sanctuaries, prescribed fire, selective herbicide application, and fertilizing natural food sources such as fruiting trees and field edges are all fantastic alternatives, and they are just as much a part of QDM as growing food plots. In fact, you might say that it was the cheapest, easiest, and cheapest food plot option because it doesn't require clearing land, buying seed, preparing soil, or any of the other headaches associated with growing food plots. Good luck!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

A food plot will not do well with no sun. BioGuy gives good advice, as usual

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Would a feeder work?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I've hand seeded areas simular to yours after removing leaves and brush with a rake. I buy a mix of winter wheat, ryegrass, clover, rape and turnips from the local co op. first I'll rake in a little 10-10-10 or 13-13-13, then using a hand broadcaster, I'll seed the area. As long as the area gets 3 good hours of sun the plot will grow. This a low percentage plot, but will still offer an attracting green up. I've seen the winter wheat and ryegrass germinate in pine needles. I'll also partially cut small trees so they create laydowns that live and offer fresh browse for the deer.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from country road wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Beekeeper gave a good recommendation for a pre-mix seed combo that worked well in shade a few days ago. I don't remember what it was, but you might use the search bar on this answers page to pull it up.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Instead of pouring money into a food plot in an area of ground that's tough to grow a food plot, you may want to consider some other less expensive and equally produtive options. Timber Stand Improvement (TSI), browse cuts, creating edge, creating sanctuaries, prescribed fire, selective herbicide application, and fertilizing natural food sources such as fruiting trees and field edges are all fantastic alternatives, and they are just as much a part of QDM as growing food plots. In fact, you might say that it was the cheapest, easiest, and cheapest food plot option because it doesn't require clearing land, buying seed, preparing soil, or any of the other headaches associated with growing food plots. Good luck!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I've hand seeded areas simular to yours after removing leaves and brush with a rake. I buy a mix of winter wheat, ryegrass, clover, rape and turnips from the local co op. first I'll rake in a little 10-10-10 or 13-13-13, then using a hand broadcaster, I'll seed the area. As long as the area gets 3 good hours of sun the plot will grow. This a low percentage plot, but will still offer an attracting green up. I've seen the winter wheat and ryegrass germinate in pine needles. I'll also partially cut small trees so they create laydowns that live and offer fresh browse for the deer.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

A food plot will not do well with no sun. BioGuy gives good advice, as usual

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Would a feeder work?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

bmxbiz-fs