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Q:
Whats something i could carve out of wood that would be easy for a beginner? and what kind of wood is best carving?

Question by thunderdog512. Uploaded on January 12, 2011

Answers (15)

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from DM5115 wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Toothpick

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from furbuster wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

My ex had a brother that carved an eagles head on the end of a peace pipe, said it was pretty easy to do. Around here alot of people choose Basswood .

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from WVOtter wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

I agree with basswood, a bit more solid and less brittle than balsa, but easily carvable. I've carved scale versions of kayaks people in my family have for cake toppers and ornaments, pretty basic. Could carve some bass plugs, although I don't know how well hook screws would anchor in.

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from ab130656 wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

a small boat :)

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from Cgull wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Any wood is good practice wood. Hard wood is best, but any you can get your hands on will work. I carve in Black Walnut, it's a dark and grainy hardwood that I have easy access too. Start small and try different shapes. Birds, fish, hands and small totem poles are good starting shapes. One of the best carvings I've seen was a life size hand laying flat and facing up that hand that was carved in cedar. Start with something small and easy. The more you carve the better you'll get. Good luck and good carving!!

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from santa wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Fishing lures are easy to carve and I use juniper wood. Any shape you come up with is unique so there will only be one in the world like it. It does not even have to catch fish, just the eyes of beholder to be a sucess.

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from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Near life size bears seem to be popular in N,Y, state given their basic shape and the numerous chain saws around. As far as wood something without a strong grain like Poplar or Balsa

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from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Balsa strong grain...?

Basswood and Tupelo (nyssa aquatica) are probably the most used species for carving decoys and such. They are also reasonably priced and are even grained and easy to work with sharp tools.

Duck decoys are fairly easy to carve and can be laid out with as much or as little detail as you want. They are a larger project and might be easier than chip carving a small lure where detail could be tedious.

Ease of carving also depends on your ability. Don't get discouraged if at first you don't succeed.

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from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Beekeeper meant to say any hard wood without pronounced grain, what you call basswood or tupelo down south we call tulip poplar, boxwood or english plain even bala up here. All slightly different but all hard wood all the same.

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from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Carl,

Never heard Tulip or Yellow Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) called anything but. I've heard Boxelder (Acer negundo) called boxwood as well as basswood being called the same as both are used for that purpose. English Plane or Plane Tree is another name for Basswood. The Brits also call it Lime Tree.

I use a fair amount of green and yellow heartwood poplar for turkey calls. It was one of Mr. Neil Costs favorite woods and does produce an excellent box call. That is due to what Mr. Cost referred to as its dough like texture. I've never thought it was dough like but if the grain is even it does cave well. I have some dark green sap wood that is every bit as hard as Red Maple! Poplar sap wood is rather hard compared with its heart wood.

The buttress roots from the Swamp Gum Tupelo (nyssa aquatica) make excellent carving wood. It is soft and even grained. Much of this goes into duck decoys.

I agree the dest carving woods are those with an even grain texture.

Cheers!

Bee

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from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Guess if your not speaking Latin its where you are and what you call it [pecan-"pecon"]. What you might call a Hero sandwich Sub or Grinder might be a good example. Best advise I would think would be keep your tools as sharp as they can be. Have a good one!

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from buckhunter wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Duck decoys would be fun...

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from JImp wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

The first thing I ever carved was in paducah, which is a wood similar to balsa, but a bit denser. I first carved a banana. Sounds pretty trivial, but it got me used to making the transition from looking at an object and converting that visual picture to a solid form. The grain is very straight and very wide.

The second thing that I carved was an red delicious apple out of old growth Western red cedar. The cedar introduced me to having to deal with the characteristics of the material. While the grain of the wood was straight, cedar has a very definite grain and there are no straight lines on an apple.

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from casestevenson wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

just rough starters, i'd say pine wood, and make a boat. That's what they had me do when i was learning the ay of a ship when i was in the navy, ad a boat is about the only thing i've ever been able to carve, other than a smaller stick with no bark...

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from Calum MacDonald wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Here in Scotland, silver birch is fantastic for beginners, it's really strong and easy to carve!!!

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from Cgull wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Any wood is good practice wood. Hard wood is best, but any you can get your hands on will work. I carve in Black Walnut, it's a dark and grainy hardwood that I have easy access too. Start small and try different shapes. Birds, fish, hands and small totem poles are good starting shapes. One of the best carvings I've seen was a life size hand laying flat and facing up that hand that was carved in cedar. Start with something small and easy. The more you carve the better you'll get. Good luck and good carving!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from DM5115 wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Toothpick

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from furbuster wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

My ex had a brother that carved an eagles head on the end of a peace pipe, said it was pretty easy to do. Around here alot of people choose Basswood .

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WVOtter wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

I agree with basswood, a bit more solid and less brittle than balsa, but easily carvable. I've carved scale versions of kayaks people in my family have for cake toppers and ornaments, pretty basic. Could carve some bass plugs, although I don't know how well hook screws would anchor in.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ab130656 wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

a small boat :)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from santa wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Fishing lures are easy to carve and I use juniper wood. Any shape you come up with is unique so there will only be one in the world like it. It does not even have to catch fish, just the eyes of beholder to be a sucess.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from casestevenson wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

just rough starters, i'd say pine wood, and make a boat. That's what they had me do when i was learning the ay of a ship when i was in the navy, ad a boat is about the only thing i've ever been able to carve, other than a smaller stick with no bark...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Near life size bears seem to be popular in N,Y, state given their basic shape and the numerous chain saws around. As far as wood something without a strong grain like Poplar or Balsa

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Balsa strong grain...?

Basswood and Tupelo (nyssa aquatica) are probably the most used species for carving decoys and such. They are also reasonably priced and are even grained and easy to work with sharp tools.

Duck decoys are fairly easy to carve and can be laid out with as much or as little detail as you want. They are a larger project and might be easier than chip carving a small lure where detail could be tedious.

Ease of carving also depends on your ability. Don't get discouraged if at first you don't succeed.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Beekeeper meant to say any hard wood without pronounced grain, what you call basswood or tupelo down south we call tulip poplar, boxwood or english plain even bala up here. All slightly different but all hard wood all the same.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Carl,

Never heard Tulip or Yellow Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) called anything but. I've heard Boxelder (Acer negundo) called boxwood as well as basswood being called the same as both are used for that purpose. English Plane or Plane Tree is another name for Basswood. The Brits also call it Lime Tree.

I use a fair amount of green and yellow heartwood poplar for turkey calls. It was one of Mr. Neil Costs favorite woods and does produce an excellent box call. That is due to what Mr. Cost referred to as its dough like texture. I've never thought it was dough like but if the grain is even it does cave well. I have some dark green sap wood that is every bit as hard as Red Maple! Poplar sap wood is rather hard compared with its heart wood.

The buttress roots from the Swamp Gum Tupelo (nyssa aquatica) make excellent carving wood. It is soft and even grained. Much of this goes into duck decoys.

I agree the dest carving woods are those with an even grain texture.

Cheers!

Bee

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Guess if your not speaking Latin its where you are and what you call it [pecan-"pecon"]. What you might call a Hero sandwich Sub or Grinder might be a good example. Best advise I would think would be keep your tools as sharp as they can be. Have a good one!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Duck decoys would be fun...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JImp wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

The first thing I ever carved was in paducah, which is a wood similar to balsa, but a bit denser. I first carved a banana. Sounds pretty trivial, but it got me used to making the transition from looking at an object and converting that visual picture to a solid form. The grain is very straight and very wide.

The second thing that I carved was an red delicious apple out of old growth Western red cedar. The cedar introduced me to having to deal with the characteristics of the material. While the grain of the wood was straight, cedar has a very definite grain and there are no straight lines on an apple.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Calum MacDonald wrote 1 year 1 week ago

Here in Scotland, silver birch is fantastic for beginners, it's really strong and easy to carve!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer