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Q:
Your dog is very old and very sick and you know it's time to have him put to sleep. Do you do it yourself or take the dog to the vet?

Question by buckhunter. Uploaded on April 26, 2009

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from slothman wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Thats always a sad situation, on one hand if you do it yourself you know that the last thing you FRIEND will see is you-the constant object of affection and security in his life; while at the vet he will be around strangers in a place he doesnt like. However doing it your self is devastating- there have only been two times that I have seen my father cry, and one of them was when he put one of his dogs down. I have had one euthanized and it hurt- ... sorry I didn't help much it's just such a personal decision.

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from KMB33 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I agree with slotham. If the vet does it your dog is surrounded by stranger at the end. If you do it you willl be the last person he sees, and it may help ease his pain. I guess it is just a personall decision.

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from hunt_fish_sleep wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

When my dog developed irreversible gastro-intestinal problems, I had the same dilemma. I decided to do it myself and borrowed the idea from the ending of "Of Mice and Men." I gave her a treat and when she bent down to eat it I shot her in the back of the head with my Dad's .38. I felt terrible, and some may say that is terrible, but it was really the humane thing to do because she was mortally afraid of the vet and would've died unhappy. This way she died quickly and without warning. It does take a lot to shoot your own dog, especially one that you love very much.

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My dog hated the vet. Just the smell of the kennels and medicine from the parking lot had him running back to the truck. I didn't have the heart to make that his last memory. I did it myself. By far the toughest day of my life. That was 1999.

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from Jeff Bowers wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

We've lost 4 animals due to advanced age. One was a cat that thought he was a dog I had 18 years.

I haven't seen animal put down like that since I was a child (I wasn't supposed to). And it was sickening. The dog did not die instantly. Is that the last thing you want a friend to know? A bang and pain?

Most animals that hate the vet. are, to my experience, not well socialized or even treated dogs. If you take the dogs or cats to the vet regularly for shots and checkups, and not just when they're injured too badly to treat yourself, they do not hate the place like that. Heidi loves to go meet dogs and people there.

Both of our dogs are rescues, and one was badly treated for the first 7 months of his life. He was a virtual basket case. Only Heidi, our terrier, could draw him out. My wife is amazing at training dogs, and now they will go to the vet. as easily as the park.

First, you can specify the "two-needle" method, which I would recommend. The dog is given a dose of relaxant, and helps the pain. We waited too long on one girl to make the decision, and she was clearly hurting. Everybody gets to say goodbye, and hug the dear, while the second shot is given. With a good vet. doing this, your pet has had a good treat, and goes to sleep while getting nuzzled in your arms. Tang just kind of sighed, and pushed into my face, then relaxed. I still miss him.

Second, you can get most vets to make a house call for this reason. The pet can be laying on the floor by the fireplace having a special treat when it's done.

I've seen animals die from trauma, including shooting, and I cannot say that the "old yeller" way is either humane or painless.

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from kolbster wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

i would do it my self, besides weather treated bad or not most dong still hate the vet.

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from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I took my dog to the vet when it came to that time... I was able to be with him the entire time and hold him while they were doing it. It was quite sad and is like loosing a best friend. Things like this are reasons why I question myself before getting a new dog... putting one to sleep is one of the hardest things I have done.

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from silsbyj wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I would do it myself. I think that time is coming up within the year for the ol Gordon Setter. Sure it will be hard but I cant paying someone else to do it and she would want to go out in the wild...not some vets office.

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from CPT BRAD wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

OK first let me qualify this by saying I was raised on a farm with a kennel, but I have put down a bunch of dogs and a horse. The horse hurt the most but it had been hit by a car and was laid out. No brainer there. I would do it yourself, Jeff makes a very good point as do the others, it will be something you will remeber for the rest of your life so if you can't do it or have any reservation about it call the vet or one of your friends that aren't as attached. The last thing you need to do it break down in front of your dog and then have to shoot it more than once. Painful and messy for the animal

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from Big O wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

They have vets that will come out and do it at the house, so the animal will feel more comfortable.I say do it yourself."God Bless them, everyone".

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from victorytw228 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I would take it to the vet. I would hate to have to shoot my dog. I got a blue heeler about a year ago. In his first months he caught parvo. So we took him to the vet, and i asked her if i should just go ahead and have him euthinized, or go along with the treatment. She said that he was in pretty bad shape, but she couldnt make that call. I didnt put him down and he made a full recovery. He is a tuff little guy. But it was even hard for me to put down a dog with a little bit of hope.

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from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

A bad sitiuation any way you do it. Have gone with buddies when they had to put down a pet, I don't think I could do it myself. Have seen missed point blank shots turn into tramatic situations with wounded pets not going quietly or peacfully. I think the vet would be the route I would pursue, especially if they would do it at your own home.

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from rrmont wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I would call the vet and see if he/she would come to your house and do it. I have done it both ways and having the vet come over was alot easier. I don't think that I would want the pressure of having to make sure that your did it right the first time again. It's hard enough to have one put down, but to have to do it your self with tears in your eyes makes it very hard to do it correctly on the first time.

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from Christian Emter wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I would do it myself, because I would save a couple grand.

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from texasmcintyre wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

It cost $50.00 to carry your pet to the vet. I personally could not do it because I consider my dog's my family. If you decide to go to the vet they will give you the option of staying in the room with your pet until they pass.

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from 284mag wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Take your pal to the vet and they'll handle everything. You can even have all or some of the ashes if you choose creamation. BTW: it's ok to cry

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from usmcturkey wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I had my first dog when I was 2, 14 wonderful years later I had to put her down. My father made me take her to the vets. They asked if I wanted to be with her and I said yes. They allowed me to pet her until she died. They wrapped her up in her Bart Simpson blanket that she loved. We took her home and I buried her.

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from Del in KS wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

The thing I love about my dogs Jill (German Shorthaired pup) and Bunny (Toy Poodle) is many of their non-human qualities. The love you get from man's best friend is unconditional. They never have hidden agendas or borrow money that won't be repaid. And they are always there with a grand reception when you come home after a really sh!tty day at the office. Bunny is 9 years old and we had to see the Vet earlier today because of an Epileptic (spelling?) seizure. Having to put her down is coming, but hopefully not for a few more years. It will be like losing one of the kids. Have no idea how we will do or deal with it.

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from jlfreeborn wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I had to put mine down a few years back. I would suggest that you get a friend who is not close to the dog to do it for you. That way, you save the expense of the vet, the animal is humanely dispatched, and you don't have the last memory being pointing a gun at your dog.

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from DanInArkinsaw wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I just went through this about 2 or 3 months ago. My 13 year old Labrador has been having seizures about 6 months and she finally had one that she was not snapping out of. I considered it my duty to "put her down". My friend had been the owner of her mother and had told me about her laying in his living room for several hours with the same problem and the horror of trying to comfort her while she slowly died. Not my dog, I thought. As I unloaded her to do the deed I began to understand why he had not done it. I have never felt gutwrenching pain like that. I had to just tell myself it was best. It was instant and painless and after it was done, she wagged her tail. May sound silly, but I believe she thanked me. I will never have a dog that can even compare to my Chocolate Mousse.

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from ken.mcloud wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I've done this both ways - they both suck.

But with dogs that have been your best friend for a decade, the injection route definitely sucks less. As hunters we all know that instant death from a bullet (even to the head) is not guaranteed.

The ideal situation would really be if you could buy the injections and do it yourself. Then you get the best of both worlds. We had a vet that left us a syringe for a horse for this reason. Though, I bet he could have gotten in a lot of trouble if anyone found out.

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from Reid Jones wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

yeah there's a vet in my town that will go to your house and do it at your house for the comfort of the dog and comfort of the people.

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Our vet makes house calls, and she gave my old dog a combination of meds that permitted her to drift off to sleep. She relaxed completely and her breathing ceased about 30 seconds later. I should have asked what the ingredients were, though I know one of them was morphine sulfate. Our dog was on my lap and surrounded by family when she slipped away. It was the best I could do for her.

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from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I wish I hadn't even read this blog, it's to much for me to consider.

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from DrMike wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I don't think I could actually do it myself. But I would ask my brother or dad. Because they both know him but still have that distant touch. He would be in great hands and they would take care of it right.

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from Armchair Mike wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

It's worth it to me to pay the vet. I don't want my last memory of my friend to be pulling the trigger. I'd take a needle over a bullet for myself if I had to choose. No matter what you do, it won't be easy, but why risk a flinch in such an emotional situation?

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from dwaynez wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I have let one of my dogs pass at home, but I went to my vet for medicine first. I did not want my dog to suffer in anyway, after he passed he was burried under his favorite tree.

After that situation I made the choice to take my pets to the vet when it was time to put them down, but they are always brought back home to be burried in their favorite place.

Either way you go it is a difficult situation

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from Jeff Bowers wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

From someone whose dogs and cats have always been a part of the family, the people who talk of the expense of a vet just fries my bacon. As stated, a dog gives the most unconditional love there is (if you let it). I've never believed in the "total outside dog". In winter they lay by the fireplace and summer they flop wherever. They watch TV on the couch with us, which usually turns to 'rasslin because they both don't fit well. They ask for so little, really.

All our animals have always been rescues, and a few have had emotional or physical problems to overcome. Picture a 7-month old puppy mill dog who didn't even know what grass was, with skinny, underdeveloped legs and muscles. Then watch him learn to play, bulk up, and generally learn that not all humans are pure evil. Takes about 4 months, and it's worth your soul to see that light bulb come on.

We're not fanatics about it, actually because we can't afford to be. We never have more animals than we can adequately care for, including decent food, shots, and regular vet visits. The four we have lost have all left in my arms, being scratched and loved in a quiet setting by their "pack".

So you cheapskates, look on the bright side. You won't be buying any more of cheapest dog food you can find anymore. For something that gave it's entire life to you, pay it back with a touch of kindness.

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from Bella wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

You shoot yer own dog. Iused to be "Chief Dog wrestler for a vet. I got to hold 'em down when the not so good doctor would put the needle in. I've seen convultions ensue and I have seen the not- so- good doctor inject ether directly into a dogs chest cavity to make a dog die faster. I been there, and a .22 to the head is as merciful as anything. Shoot yer own dog.

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from Nick Jensen wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

If my dog had been hit by a car or was suffering and in mortal pain for some other reason I would shoot it to end it quickly. If it was a sort of terminal illness I would see if I could procure some sort of poison give it to her as a sort of final last meal, I would rather do it that way than have to shoot my best friend.

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from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I did it myself once because that was the way a real man did it and still feel bad about it. Now I take them to the vet. It is a real sad event and there is no amount of money that makes me want to make it sadder.

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from matouse3 wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Vet, the other route is easier said than done.

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from JOHN ANDERSON wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

I COULDNT SHOOT MY PARTNER.THE ROUTE I WENT WAS OUR VET HAD A SHOT IT WAS QUICK AND PAINLESS.IT SMOOTHED A VERY SAD PROCESS IN LIFE.

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from jordjohn44 wrote 4 years 25 weeks ago

I wasn't able to shoot my dog. I brought her into the vet and gave her proper respect to go out in peace.

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from lucky07 wrote 4 years 25 weeks ago

I gotta go put a pup out of it's misery tomorrow. Dog didn't move all day today and when she took a couple steps she stumbled and couldn't get back up too quick. I'm thinking it's cancer due to the dogs age and the amount of weight shes lost. Buddy of mine had his put down a couple days ago and it cost him a couple hundred bucks. Thing is this guy doesn't have that kinda cash. Done it before ... always sucks and never gets any easier. Even if it's not your damn dog they always remind you of one you were close to.

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from Bella wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

A big problem is that the veterinary industry has mostly gone as corrupt as the so called Health Maintainance Orgs. When you have profit driven health care, whether for humans or animals generally they drive the rates as high as the public can bear (or higher). People cannot be allowed to profit from other beings pain and suffering. It is one thing to kill something to eat, or kill something to put it out of it's mizery, but when the executioner takes unfair advantage of the distraught, that's immoral.
One of the things that made me quit workin' for the vet was the day two little Hispanic boys brought their mixed breed puppy to the animal hospital in their little red wagon with a compound fracture in a hind leg. The not-so compassionate vet sent them away. Of course there are good veterinarians, but the industry is self regulated to keep prices as high as possible. Veterinary schools are rare and difficult and expensive to enter. All of these factors work to focus the veterinary industry on profits not compassion towards suffering animals. Yes it is emotionally difficult to euthanize (shoot) your own sick or injured animal, but what is the choice if the vet wouln't come and you can't pay him anyway. Sometimes you just have to butch up and do it, for the sake of a nonhuman friend. At any rate since veterinary care has become driven by economics (the dismal science) the economics is this 2 cents for a .22 round versus something north of 80 bucks. That 80 bucks will sure buy a lot of feed for the living critters, not to mention the gas to drive the critter to the vet. At the Vet's the bodies get frozen in a freezer till they get incinerated. On the farm you dig a hole and get to pick out a nice big rock if the animal was that memorable. The vet will give you back the dog collar. I've had to do the math mor'n once and I know how the cards fell.
There was that choice of a two cent dead billygoat or an eight hundred dollar dead billygoat. That was an easy choice! (next fullgrown billygoat I have to do I'm going to a bigger caliber though).

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from rudyglove27 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

I do it myself for the past 30 years!!!

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from Bruss wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

I've had 3 dogs in less than 40 years. One died in my wife's arms from an unknown bite. He took 4 days before allergic shock bled him out internally and he drowned trying to get back to a vet in the truck.Worst thing I've ever seen, ever.

My first and oldest got the injection after a 2 year old tumor ruptured on her leg and gangrene started. It was not as quick and easy as I thought and I buried her in the pouring rain afterward.

I just put down my last dog this morning. He started having skin problems early on and by age 10, he had become miserable. Couldn't walk from eating his legs raw. His fur was never coming back. We spent countless dollars and several years trying to treat him. He quit eating and wouldn't get up for days before I dug a hole and shot him in the head with a .22 pistol. It took days of racking my brain before I did it. The vet had already told me he would do it if I wanted. After the last 2 I decided to do it at home. It's not pretty but he was gone quicker than any of the others. Very sad but I had cried so much the last few nights with him it was time. It was right to end his suffering and a relief for it to be done.

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from CoastieJim82 wrote 23 weeks 3 days ago

I would do it myself. last little time with mans best friend.

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from CoastieJim82 wrote 23 weeks 3 days ago

I would do it myself. last little time with mans best friend.

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from Jeff Bowers wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

From someone whose dogs and cats have always been a part of the family, the people who talk of the expense of a vet just fries my bacon. As stated, a dog gives the most unconditional love there is (if you let it). I've never believed in the "total outside dog". In winter they lay by the fireplace and summer they flop wherever. They watch TV on the couch with us, which usually turns to 'rasslin because they both don't fit well. They ask for so little, really.

All our animals have always been rescues, and a few have had emotional or physical problems to overcome. Picture a 7-month old puppy mill dog who didn't even know what grass was, with skinny, underdeveloped legs and muscles. Then watch him learn to play, bulk up, and generally learn that not all humans are pure evil. Takes about 4 months, and it's worth your soul to see that light bulb come on.

We're not fanatics about it, actually because we can't afford to be. We never have more animals than we can adequately care for, including decent food, shots, and regular vet visits. The four we have lost have all left in my arms, being scratched and loved in a quiet setting by their "pack".

So you cheapskates, look on the bright side. You won't be buying any more of cheapest dog food you can find anymore. For something that gave it's entire life to you, pay it back with a touch of kindness.

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from CPT BRAD wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

OK first let me qualify this by saying I was raised on a farm with a kennel, but I have put down a bunch of dogs and a horse. The horse hurt the most but it had been hit by a car and was laid out. No brainer there. I would do it yourself, Jeff makes a very good point as do the others, it will be something you will remeber for the rest of your life so if you can't do it or have any reservation about it call the vet or one of your friends that aren't as attached. The last thing you need to do it break down in front of your dog and then have to shoot it more than once. Painful and messy for the animal

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from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Our vet makes house calls, and she gave my old dog a combination of meds that permitted her to drift off to sleep. She relaxed completely and her breathing ceased about 30 seconds later. I should have asked what the ingredients were, though I know one of them was morphine sulfate. Our dog was on my lap and surrounded by family when she slipped away. It was the best I could do for her.

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from jordjohn44 wrote 4 years 25 weeks ago

I wasn't able to shoot my dog. I brought her into the vet and gave her proper respect to go out in peace.

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from slothman wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Thats always a sad situation, on one hand if you do it yourself you know that the last thing you FRIEND will see is you-the constant object of affection and security in his life; while at the vet he will be around strangers in a place he doesnt like. However doing it your self is devastating- there have only been two times that I have seen my father cry, and one of them was when he put one of his dogs down. I have had one euthanized and it hurt- ... sorry I didn't help much it's just such a personal decision.

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from KMB33 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I agree with slotham. If the vet does it your dog is surrounded by stranger at the end. If you do it you willl be the last person he sees, and it may help ease his pain. I guess it is just a personall decision.

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

My dog hated the vet. Just the smell of the kennels and medicine from the parking lot had him running back to the truck. I didn't have the heart to make that his last memory. I did it myself. By far the toughest day of my life. That was 1999.

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from Jeff Bowers wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

We've lost 4 animals due to advanced age. One was a cat that thought he was a dog I had 18 years.

I haven't seen animal put down like that since I was a child (I wasn't supposed to). And it was sickening. The dog did not die instantly. Is that the last thing you want a friend to know? A bang and pain?

Most animals that hate the vet. are, to my experience, not well socialized or even treated dogs. If you take the dogs or cats to the vet regularly for shots and checkups, and not just when they're injured too badly to treat yourself, they do not hate the place like that. Heidi loves to go meet dogs and people there.

Both of our dogs are rescues, and one was badly treated for the first 7 months of his life. He was a virtual basket case. Only Heidi, our terrier, could draw him out. My wife is amazing at training dogs, and now they will go to the vet. as easily as the park.

First, you can specify the "two-needle" method, which I would recommend. The dog is given a dose of relaxant, and helps the pain. We waited too long on one girl to make the decision, and she was clearly hurting. Everybody gets to say goodbye, and hug the dear, while the second shot is given. With a good vet. doing this, your pet has had a good treat, and goes to sleep while getting nuzzled in your arms. Tang just kind of sighed, and pushed into my face, then relaxed. I still miss him.

Second, you can get most vets to make a house call for this reason. The pet can be laying on the floor by the fireplace having a special treat when it's done.

I've seen animals die from trauma, including shooting, and I cannot say that the "old yeller" way is either humane or painless.

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from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I took my dog to the vet when it came to that time... I was able to be with him the entire time and hold him while they were doing it. It was quite sad and is like loosing a best friend. Things like this are reasons why I question myself before getting a new dog... putting one to sleep is one of the hardest things I have done.

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from Big O wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

They have vets that will come out and do it at the house, so the animal will feel more comfortable.I say do it yourself."God Bless them, everyone".

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from 284mag wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

Take your pal to the vet and they'll handle everything. You can even have all or some of the ashes if you choose creamation. BTW: it's ok to cry

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from usmcturkey wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I had my first dog when I was 2, 14 wonderful years later I had to put her down. My father made me take her to the vets. They asked if I wanted to be with her and I said yes. They allowed me to pet her until she died. They wrapped her up in her Bart Simpson blanket that she loved. We took her home and I buried her.

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from Del in KS wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

The thing I love about my dogs Jill (German Shorthaired pup) and Bunny (Toy Poodle) is many of their non-human qualities. The love you get from man's best friend is unconditional. They never have hidden agendas or borrow money that won't be repaid. And they are always there with a grand reception when you come home after a really sh!tty day at the office. Bunny is 9 years old and we had to see the Vet earlier today because of an Epileptic (spelling?) seizure. Having to put her down is coming, but hopefully not for a few more years. It will be like losing one of the kids. Have no idea how we will do or deal with it.

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from Reid Jones wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

yeah there's a vet in my town that will go to your house and do it at your house for the comfort of the dog and comfort of the people.

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from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I wish I hadn't even read this blog, it's to much for me to consider.

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from Armchair Mike wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

It's worth it to me to pay the vet. I don't want my last memory of my friend to be pulling the trigger. I'd take a needle over a bullet for myself if I had to choose. No matter what you do, it won't be easy, but why risk a flinch in such an emotional situation?

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from dwaynez wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I have let one of my dogs pass at home, but I went to my vet for medicine first. I did not want my dog to suffer in anyway, after he passed he was burried under his favorite tree.

After that situation I made the choice to take my pets to the vet when it was time to put them down, but they are always brought back home to be burried in their favorite place.

Either way you go it is a difficult situation

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nick Jensen wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

If my dog had been hit by a car or was suffering and in mortal pain for some other reason I would shoot it to end it quickly. If it was a sort of terminal illness I would see if I could procure some sort of poison give it to her as a sort of final last meal, I would rather do it that way than have to shoot my best friend.

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from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I did it myself once because that was the way a real man did it and still feel bad about it. Now I take them to the vet. It is a real sad event and there is no amount of money that makes me want to make it sadder.

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from matouse3 wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Vet, the other route is easier said than done.

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from JOHN ANDERSON wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

I COULDNT SHOOT MY PARTNER.THE ROUTE I WENT WAS OUR VET HAD A SHOT IT WAS QUICK AND PAINLESS.IT SMOOTHED A VERY SAD PROCESS IN LIFE.

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from hunt_fish_sleep wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

When my dog developed irreversible gastro-intestinal problems, I had the same dilemma. I decided to do it myself and borrowed the idea from the ending of "Of Mice and Men." I gave her a treat and when she bent down to eat it I shot her in the back of the head with my Dad's .38. I felt terrible, and some may say that is terrible, but it was really the humane thing to do because she was mortally afraid of the vet and would've died unhappy. This way she died quickly and without warning. It does take a lot to shoot your own dog, especially one that you love very much.

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from kolbster wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

i would do it my self, besides weather treated bad or not most dong still hate the vet.

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from silsbyj wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I would do it myself. I think that time is coming up within the year for the ol Gordon Setter. Sure it will be hard but I cant paying someone else to do it and she would want to go out in the wild...not some vets office.

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from victorytw228 wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I would take it to the vet. I would hate to have to shoot my dog. I got a blue heeler about a year ago. In his first months he caught parvo. So we took him to the vet, and i asked her if i should just go ahead and have him euthinized, or go along with the treatment. She said that he was in pretty bad shape, but she couldnt make that call. I didnt put him down and he made a full recovery. He is a tuff little guy. But it was even hard for me to put down a dog with a little bit of hope.

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from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

A bad sitiuation any way you do it. Have gone with buddies when they had to put down a pet, I don't think I could do it myself. Have seen missed point blank shots turn into tramatic situations with wounded pets not going quietly or peacfully. I think the vet would be the route I would pursue, especially if they would do it at your own home.

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from rrmont wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I would call the vet and see if he/she would come to your house and do it. I have done it both ways and having the vet come over was alot easier. I don't think that I would want the pressure of having to make sure that your did it right the first time again. It's hard enough to have one put down, but to have to do it your self with tears in your eyes makes it very hard to do it correctly on the first time.

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from Christian Emter wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I would do it myself, because I would save a couple grand.

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from texasmcintyre wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

It cost $50.00 to carry your pet to the vet. I personally could not do it because I consider my dog's my family. If you decide to go to the vet they will give you the option of staying in the room with your pet until they pass.

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from jlfreeborn wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I had to put mine down a few years back. I would suggest that you get a friend who is not close to the dog to do it for you. That way, you save the expense of the vet, the animal is humanely dispatched, and you don't have the last memory being pointing a gun at your dog.

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from DanInArkinsaw wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I just went through this about 2 or 3 months ago. My 13 year old Labrador has been having seizures about 6 months and she finally had one that she was not snapping out of. I considered it my duty to "put her down". My friend had been the owner of her mother and had told me about her laying in his living room for several hours with the same problem and the horror of trying to comfort her while she slowly died. Not my dog, I thought. As I unloaded her to do the deed I began to understand why he had not done it. I have never felt gutwrenching pain like that. I had to just tell myself it was best. It was instant and painless and after it was done, she wagged her tail. May sound silly, but I believe she thanked me. I will never have a dog that can even compare to my Chocolate Mousse.

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from ken.mcloud wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I've done this both ways - they both suck.

But with dogs that have been your best friend for a decade, the injection route definitely sucks less. As hunters we all know that instant death from a bullet (even to the head) is not guaranteed.

The ideal situation would really be if you could buy the injections and do it yourself. Then you get the best of both worlds. We had a vet that left us a syringe for a horse for this reason. Though, I bet he could have gotten in a lot of trouble if anyone found out.

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from DrMike wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

I don't think I could actually do it myself. But I would ask my brother or dad. Because they both know him but still have that distant touch. He would be in great hands and they would take care of it right.

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from Bella wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

You shoot yer own dog. Iused to be "Chief Dog wrestler for a vet. I got to hold 'em down when the not so good doctor would put the needle in. I've seen convultions ensue and I have seen the not- so- good doctor inject ether directly into a dogs chest cavity to make a dog die faster. I been there, and a .22 to the head is as merciful as anything. Shoot yer own dog.

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from lucky07 wrote 4 years 25 weeks ago

I gotta go put a pup out of it's misery tomorrow. Dog didn't move all day today and when she took a couple steps she stumbled and couldn't get back up too quick. I'm thinking it's cancer due to the dogs age and the amount of weight shes lost. Buddy of mine had his put down a couple days ago and it cost him a couple hundred bucks. Thing is this guy doesn't have that kinda cash. Done it before ... always sucks and never gets any easier. Even if it's not your damn dog they always remind you of one you were close to.

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from Bella wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

A big problem is that the veterinary industry has mostly gone as corrupt as the so called Health Maintainance Orgs. When you have profit driven health care, whether for humans or animals generally they drive the rates as high as the public can bear (or higher). People cannot be allowed to profit from other beings pain and suffering. It is one thing to kill something to eat, or kill something to put it out of it's mizery, but when the executioner takes unfair advantage of the distraught, that's immoral.
One of the things that made me quit workin' for the vet was the day two little Hispanic boys brought their mixed breed puppy to the animal hospital in their little red wagon with a compound fracture in a hind leg. The not-so compassionate vet sent them away. Of course there are good veterinarians, but the industry is self regulated to keep prices as high as possible. Veterinary schools are rare and difficult and expensive to enter. All of these factors work to focus the veterinary industry on profits not compassion towards suffering animals. Yes it is emotionally difficult to euthanize (shoot) your own sick or injured animal, but what is the choice if the vet wouln't come and you can't pay him anyway. Sometimes you just have to butch up and do it, for the sake of a nonhuman friend. At any rate since veterinary care has become driven by economics (the dismal science) the economics is this 2 cents for a .22 round versus something north of 80 bucks. That 80 bucks will sure buy a lot of feed for the living critters, not to mention the gas to drive the critter to the vet. At the Vet's the bodies get frozen in a freezer till they get incinerated. On the farm you dig a hole and get to pick out a nice big rock if the animal was that memorable. The vet will give you back the dog collar. I've had to do the math mor'n once and I know how the cards fell.
There was that choice of a two cent dead billygoat or an eight hundred dollar dead billygoat. That was an easy choice! (next fullgrown billygoat I have to do I'm going to a bigger caliber though).

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from rudyglove27 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

I do it myself for the past 30 years!!!

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from Bruss wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

I've had 3 dogs in less than 40 years. One died in my wife's arms from an unknown bite. He took 4 days before allergic shock bled him out internally and he drowned trying to get back to a vet in the truck.Worst thing I've ever seen, ever.

My first and oldest got the injection after a 2 year old tumor ruptured on her leg and gangrene started. It was not as quick and easy as I thought and I buried her in the pouring rain afterward.

I just put down my last dog this morning. He started having skin problems early on and by age 10, he had become miserable. Couldn't walk from eating his legs raw. His fur was never coming back. We spent countless dollars and several years trying to treat him. He quit eating and wouldn't get up for days before I dug a hole and shot him in the head with a .22 pistol. It took days of racking my brain before I did it. The vet had already told me he would do it if I wanted. After the last 2 I decided to do it at home. It's not pretty but he was gone quicker than any of the others. Very sad but I had cried so much the last few nights with him it was time. It was right to end his suffering and a relief for it to be done.

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from CoastieJim82 wrote 23 weeks 3 days ago

I would do it myself. last little time with mans best friend.

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from CoastieJim82 wrote 23 weeks 3 days ago

I would do it myself. last little time with mans best friend.

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