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Q:
Got a SERIOUS beaver problem and need to know how to get rid of em'. Are there traps for beavers i can use, or do i just have to wait until they come out and shoot them? Any suggestions on how to eliminate these critters!?

Question by Big-Buk. Uploaded on November 17, 2010

Answers (10)

Top Rated
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from Timmy12 wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Dont waste the money on paying people just bait a couple traps and you should be able to get him just check your local laws first.

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from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Shoot'em

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from joelr271 wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Get a couple #330 conibears (youtube how they work if you don't know how to set them up, or ask the guy where you buy them) and set them up on commonly used runs. That will probably be the easiest way to get a few of them. There are a few more efficient ways to trap them, but these trap sets are also more difficult to set up, and I guess I can't really explain them to you without some visual aids.

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from country road wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Beavers can be tough to trap. If you have whole colonies of them, you'll get several, but the others will get smart.

Making good beaver sets can ba a lot of work, so if you can find a pro like Bioguy was talking about, you'll be ahead of the game.

If you decide to do it yourself, there are websites and books that are a help. Mainly, you need a killer trap like the Conibear or you need to be able to make a drown set, otherwise the beavers will quickly sever a leg to get out of a trap. I had one beaver in a shallow pond chew off three of his feet before I finally dug out a hole deep enough to make a drown set.

Shooting them is very efficient if you can get them to come out where you can see them, but they are masters at concealment, especially if you miss them once or twice, and they can be a difficult target swimming around. I have found them out of the water once or twice, but it's rare since they are largely nocturnal.

AS you are probably experiencing, they can do the devil's own amount of damage to timber through flooding and girdling and they can make a mess of your road system if you depend on culverts for water flow. Good luck with your project. I class beavers right up there with feral hogs and coyotes as nuisance vermin.

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from slothman wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

I dont have anything to add to the great answers up above except mabe change your cologne :).

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from libertyfirst wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

I have a similar issue with beavers. They maintain a large dam on my property but they always get out of control every other year or so. I use the professional trappers to keep the beavers in check. They take out 6-8 every other year and the results have been good for me and the natural pond that they maintain.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Be conscious of your state's trapping regulations, as there may be a beaver trapping season of specific duration, and you could run afoul of the law by trapping out of season.

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from shane wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

We used a combination of allowing a trapper to take care of some as well as shooting them whenever we had the chance.

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from DM5115 wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

My buddy trapped some beavers on my property. I think he used a conibear #330. He got several so they must work.

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from Guy Zoller wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I had a family of beavers move in under my dock in the Thousand Islands region. I tried lights, bagpipe music and other non-lethal procedures, but nothing seemed to work. The locals kept telling me to shoot them, but I didn't think establishing a home under my dock was a capital offense. After talking to many of the local folks about the problem, most of whom said to kill them, i ran into a guy who's brother trapped beavers for a living. He told me they're very sensitive to smells, and that's when the light went on. I decided to pee on the entrance to the beaver lair. They left. It was a family that consisted of a 45 pound male, a female, and 2 pups. Beavers returned a couple of years later, and this time i used ammonia. It worked.

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from country road wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Beavers can be tough to trap. If you have whole colonies of them, you'll get several, but the others will get smart.

Making good beaver sets can ba a lot of work, so if you can find a pro like Bioguy was talking about, you'll be ahead of the game.

If you decide to do it yourself, there are websites and books that are a help. Mainly, you need a killer trap like the Conibear or you need to be able to make a drown set, otherwise the beavers will quickly sever a leg to get out of a trap. I had one beaver in a shallow pond chew off three of his feet before I finally dug out a hole deep enough to make a drown set.

Shooting them is very efficient if you can get them to come out where you can see them, but they are masters at concealment, especially if you miss them once or twice, and they can be a difficult target swimming around. I have found them out of the water once or twice, but it's rare since they are largely nocturnal.

AS you are probably experiencing, they can do the devil's own amount of damage to timber through flooding and girdling and they can make a mess of your road system if you depend on culverts for water flow. Good luck with your project. I class beavers right up there with feral hogs and coyotes as nuisance vermin.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from slothman wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

I dont have anything to add to the great answers up above except mabe change your cologne :).

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Timmy12 wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Dont waste the money on paying people just bait a couple traps and you should be able to get him just check your local laws first.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Shoot'em

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from joelr271 wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Get a couple #330 conibears (youtube how they work if you don't know how to set them up, or ask the guy where you buy them) and set them up on commonly used runs. That will probably be the easiest way to get a few of them. There are a few more efficient ways to trap them, but these trap sets are also more difficult to set up, and I guess I can't really explain them to you without some visual aids.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from libertyfirst wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

I have a similar issue with beavers. They maintain a large dam on my property but they always get out of control every other year or so. I use the professional trappers to keep the beavers in check. They take out 6-8 every other year and the results have been good for me and the natural pond that they maintain.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Be conscious of your state's trapping regulations, as there may be a beaver trapping season of specific duration, and you could run afoul of the law by trapping out of season.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

We used a combination of allowing a trapper to take care of some as well as shooting them whenever we had the chance.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DM5115 wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

My buddy trapped some beavers on my property. I think he used a conibear #330. He got several so they must work.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Guy Zoller wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I had a family of beavers move in under my dock in the Thousand Islands region. I tried lights, bagpipe music and other non-lethal procedures, but nothing seemed to work. The locals kept telling me to shoot them, but I didn't think establishing a home under my dock was a capital offense. After talking to many of the local folks about the problem, most of whom said to kill them, i ran into a guy who's brother trapped beavers for a living. He told me they're very sensitive to smells, and that's when the light went on. I decided to pee on the entrance to the beaver lair. They left. It was a family that consisted of a 45 pound male, a female, and 2 pups. Beavers returned a couple of years later, and this time i used ammonia. It worked.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer