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Q:
What effect (if any) does falling rain have on a high velocity rifle bullet? Think I know but want your input for a friend.

Question by Del in KS. Uploaded on July 09, 2010

Answers (9)

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from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

Increased humidity might affect the drag coefficient, but I doubt it would affect accuracy that much except at extreme range.

Probably will mess with the shooters mind more than the bullet!

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

That's a good question. There are correction factors for artillery and naval gunfire for rain, but I never thought too much about that for a rifle. Would like to see some of the competition shooters weigh in on this question.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

"RIGHT ON BEEKEEPER"! and a +1

Humidity and rain does have an effect, but so little, us hunters will not notice it.

Gee Wizz info,
Manufacturers of Military weapons test, fire into horizontal pipes with water running into it at a slight down slope into a vat to store the bullets. Depending on the cartridge from 223 to 30mm the bullet to ratio of water is used to stop the bullet then flush it on down the tube. The bigger the bullet, the more water is injected into the pipe.

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from country road wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

That's something I'd always kind of wondered about, myself. Thanks for the info, guys. I don't hunt in the rain that much anymore, anyhow, so it isn't likely to bother my shooting---guess I'm getting lazier as I get older.

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from grant77 wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

Good to know clay, thanks

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

It probably rains that hard in Georgia!

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from 99explorer wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

Conceptually, there should be some minor bullet deflection depending on which side of a raindrop the bullet might hit, but I think the effect of the raindrops would cancel each other out over any great distance.

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from huntnow wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

A very balisticly inclined gentleman once informed me that a fast bullet, especially HP's, had a kind of wind pocket that they traveled in through flight. This made sense to me so, therefore, would a rain drop even be able to make contact with said bullet? The physics are above my head but an interesting question.

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from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

Rain is not good for fast bullets. I actually had experimental 60g bullets explode in flight out of my 25-06 in the rain at 4200 fps. They never made it 100 yards. .220 Swift shots at 4100 fps are erratic at that range too but they make it 100 yards without blowing up. I intend to do some more experimentation with my .300 Dakota in the rain. I have gotten the 110 HPs up to 4200 fps and I want to see if they explode too. I doubt they will though because they are a heavier bullet. For normal big game and varmint hunting, I don't make any allowance for rain out to 300 yards except to cuss my scope as I try to get a visual on the target.

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from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

Increased humidity might affect the drag coefficient, but I doubt it would affect accuracy that much except at extreme range.

Probably will mess with the shooters mind more than the bullet!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

"RIGHT ON BEEKEEPER"! and a +1

Humidity and rain does have an effect, but so little, us hunters will not notice it.

Gee Wizz info,
Manufacturers of Military weapons test, fire into horizontal pipes with water running into it at a slight down slope into a vat to store the bullets. Depending on the cartridge from 223 to 30mm the bullet to ratio of water is used to stop the bullet then flush it on down the tube. The bigger the bullet, the more water is injected into the pipe.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from grant77 wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

Good to know clay, thanks

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

That's a good question. There are correction factors for artillery and naval gunfire for rain, but I never thought too much about that for a rifle. Would like to see some of the competition shooters weigh in on this question.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

That's something I'd always kind of wondered about, myself. Thanks for the info, guys. I don't hunt in the rain that much anymore, anyhow, so it isn't likely to bother my shooting---guess I'm getting lazier as I get older.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

It probably rains that hard in Georgia!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

Conceptually, there should be some minor bullet deflection depending on which side of a raindrop the bullet might hit, but I think the effect of the raindrops would cancel each other out over any great distance.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntnow wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

A very balisticly inclined gentleman once informed me that a fast bullet, especially HP's, had a kind of wind pocket that they traveled in through flight. This made sense to me so, therefore, would a rain drop even be able to make contact with said bullet? The physics are above my head but an interesting question.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

Rain is not good for fast bullets. I actually had experimental 60g bullets explode in flight out of my 25-06 in the rain at 4200 fps. They never made it 100 yards. .220 Swift shots at 4100 fps are erratic at that range too but they make it 100 yards without blowing up. I intend to do some more experimentation with my .300 Dakota in the rain. I have gotten the 110 HPs up to 4200 fps and I want to see if they explode too. I doubt they will though because they are a heavier bullet. For normal big game and varmint hunting, I don't make any allowance for rain out to 300 yards except to cuss my scope as I try to get a visual on the target.

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