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  • November 30, 2010

    Idaho Sheriff Advocates Shooting Wolves?

    By Chad Love

    Is an Idaho sheriff giving the ol' "nudge, nudge, wink, wink" to illegally shooting wolves? You be the judge.

    From this story in the Spokesman-Review:
    A northern Idaho sheriff said he is not advocating the illegal shooting of federally protected wolves by offering a hunting rifle and a shovel as the prize in a raffle called “.308 SSS Wolf Pack Raffle” in a region where SSS commonly stands for “shoot, shovel and shut up.” Idaho County Sheriff Doug Giddings said the SSS in the raffle stands for “safety, security and survival.” “We knew that this would stir up some interest,” Giddings told the Lewiston Tribune.

  • November 30, 2010

    Ohio Youth Deer Hunting Experiencing Growth Due to Apprentice Program

    By Chad Love

    Youth deer hunting in Ohio is growing, thanks to an apprentice program that lifts age restrictions for young hunters-to-be.

    From this story on the Coshocton Tribune:
    Deer hunting isn't just for the adults. More youths have been getting into the swing of things, learning their way around tree stands , the finer points of tracking and how much pull to expect on their gun or bow. For 14-year-old Lyndsie Rizzolo, hunting is becoming old hat after five years of bagging deer with her father, Scott. Hunting on her grandfather Lyndie Slaughter's farm outside of Warsaw, the younger Rizzolo passed her hunter safety course and got her first license at age 9, then got her first kill, a doe, the next year.

    "Ohio is pretty much a new hunter-friendly state because we don't have a lot of barriers like age restrictions that other states do," said Susie Vance, spokeswoman with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife Southeast District. In 2005, Ohio started the Families Afield Program, which allows youth to hunt through an apprentice license program with a licensed adult until they are ready to tackle the hunter safety course.

  • November 30, 2010

    11-Year-Old Pulls Colorado Record Smallmouth Bass

    By Chad Love

    The state of Colorado has a new record smallmouth bass, and the lucky angler who landed it will now probably have something to show the other kids at show-and-tell day. Because he's 11.

    From this story on Outdoor News Daily:
    Conner Peitsmeyer, 11, of Aurora probably won't remember the chill of the 35-degree air on the morning of Nov. 12. What he will remember for a long time is catching the new Colorado state record smallmouth bass. Conner was fishing at Aurora Reservoir with his dad, Michael Peitsmeyer, in the family's fishing boat that Friday morning. A few days before, Conner had landed his first 'big fish' in the same area, a smallmouth that was more than five pounds. But nothing prepared Conner for the 20-inch, 6-pound, 8-ounce monster he would pull from the water that morning.

  • November 29, 2010

    Montana Hunters Question Proposed 5-Year Program to Hunt Infected Elk

    By Chad Love

    Some Montana hunters are questioning a state study to to look at shooting brucellosis-infected elk.

    From this story in the Helena Independent Record:
    A study that could end with the state-sanctioned killing of elk infected with brucellosis in Montana is raising concerns among some Helena hunters. The Helena Hunters and Anglers are holding a meeting on Dec. 1 and have asked two Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks representatives to explain the five-year program, which is slated to begin at the end of January. “We just want to get it all on top of the table and start talking about some things,” said Jim Posewitz. “We haven’t seen an EA (environmental assessment) of this thing, and it seems like it’s been kind of a stealth effort. They’re not keeping it a secret, but they’re not publicizing it in front of people.”

  • November 29, 2010

    Kenyan Wildlife Service Kills 5 Poachers in a Month

    By Chad Love

    If for some inexplicable reason you find yourself with the urge to illegally shoot an African elephant, according to this AP story, you might want to steer clear of Kenya...

  • November 29, 2010

    Tension Rises as Vote for Nevada Black Bear Hunt Nears

    By Chad Love

    Defenders and opponents of a proposed Nevada black bear hunt are sharpening their legal pencils over the coming battle to get a bear season approved.

    From this story on theunion.com:
    Some regional wildlife advocates are gathering petitions and urging state officials to reject the legalizing of black bear hunting for the first time in Nevada's nearly 150-year history. The Nevada Wildlife Commission — composed of representatives from throughout the state and governing the Nevada Department of Wildlife — meets Dec. 3-4 in Reno. A hearing to consider legalizing black bear hunting is scheduled for Dec. 4. Nevada is home to 200 to 300 bears along the eastern Sierra, according to NDOW, with most in the Carson Range on Lake Tahoe's East Shore. There also are an unknown number of bears in the Wassuk and Sweetwater ranges to the south.

  • November 29, 2010

    Protested Coyote Hunt School Fundraiser Garners Huge Turnout

    By Chad Love

    Proving the wisdom of the old adage about there being no bad publicity, a "controversial" (at least to one irate dude) coyote hunt school fundraiser went ahead as planned -- with double the number of teams from last year.

    From this story on KRQE.com:
    A coyote hunt around Grady that raised the ire of a resident went on over the weekend as scheduled. A ranching family stepped in to sponsor the annual hunt after Grady newcomer Cliff Sagnotty questioned whether the public school district should sponsor a hunting event. The district has used the event in the last several years to raise money for girls' athletics. Sagnotty's concern also brought publicity.

  • November 24, 2010

    Groups File Suit Against EPA Over Failed Lead Ban Petition

    By Chad Love

    In a move that shocked absolutely no one, three groups have filed suit against the Environmental Protection Agency after the EPA denied the groups' petition to ban lead in fishing tackle and ammunition.

    From this story in the Los Angeles Times:
    Three environmental groups sued the Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday to force it to prevent lead poisoning of wildlife from spent ammunition and lost fishing tackle. The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court by the Center for Biological Diversity, Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility and the hunters group Project Gutpile. It comes after the EPA denied their petition to ban lead ammunition and lead fishing tackle, which the groups say kills 10 million to 20 million birds and other animals a year by lead poisoning. "The EPA has the ability to protect America's wildlife from ongoing preventable lead poisoning, but continues to shirk its responsibility," said Jeff Miller, conservation advocate with the Center for Biological Diversity.

  • November 24, 2010

    Scientists: Some Fish Use Mucus To Repel Mosquitoes

    By Chad Love

    If you find yourself in the deep woods without any insect repellent and hordes of mosquitoes and biting flies are closing in, you might try covering yourself with...snot. It apparently works pretty well for some fish.

    From this story on Wired Science:
    If you were to find yourself in the jungle without a mosquito net, slathering yourself in snot might be a good alternative. It works for fish: Scientists have discovered that some coral reef fish protect themselves from biting isopods, a marine equivalent of mosquitoes, by covering themselves in mucus before going to sleep at night. Researchers had speculated that the reason certain parrot fish and wrasses envelop themselves each night with a big blob of mucus might be to protect against settling silt or to deter hungry predators such as moray eels.
    But definitive experiments were lacking.

  • November 24, 2010

    Wisconsin Hunter Stumbles Upon Gruesome Roadkill Dumping Ground

    By Chad Love

    Ever wondered what happens to roadkill after it's picked up? Neither have I, but it apparently goes somewhere, and according to this story on NBC26.com (Green Bay, WI), it 'aint pretty...

    Hunters say they never expected to come across such a gruesome sight in the Navarino Wildlife Area. Dozens of dead animals and fish are what C.J. Lyse found while he was hunting deer in the Navarino Wildlife Area this weekend. But the way he found them...along with dozen's of other animals...was not what he expected. "They've got gun shot wounds, I mean they got holes in them, they've been skinned, they've got clear knife blade cuts...It's just horrifying...you can count twelve different species out here," he says. Other hunters are also outraged at seeing the carcasses of a young bear, fish, a fox and a pile of headless deer. "It makes my blood boil," says hunter Bryan Meyer.

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