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  • August 23, 2010

    Humane Society Fights South Carolina Bear "Baying"

    By Chad Love

    From this story in the Houston Chronicle:
    A declawed, defanged bear is chained to a stake as hunting dogs bark and snap at it, trying to force the bear to stand on its hind legs so hunters can shoot it more easily. The practice called bear baying is only allowed in South Carolina. Armed with new undercover video of four such events, the Humane Society of the United States is pressuring state officials to explicitly outlaw the practice, which the organization says is effectively banned in every other state. Animal rights advocates say it's cruel to the nearly defenseless bears and harms them psychologically.

  • August 20, 2010

    Mounties Bust Pot-Guarding B.C. Black Bears

    By Chad Love

    A "pack" of very well-fed and laid-back black bears  recently greeted police officers while conducting a raid at a remote Canadian  home.

    From this story on AOL News:
    Canadian police on a bust in the woods of  British Columbia found more than drugs at one remote cabin. Cops in Christina  Lake, a town of barely 1,500 year-round residents, were acting on an anonymous  tip that a woman in the woods was up to something. When they arrived, they found $1 million worth of marijuana plants, but they weren't the only ones on  the scene. Police were shocked to discover at least 10 full-grown black bears  wandering the property. One officer grabbed a shotgun, fearing for his safety.  To the officers' surprise, the bears were not hostile, and they seemed  undisturbed by the sight of armed strangers.

  • August 20, 2010

    Chad Love: Feeding the Addiction

    By Chad Love

    Here's a novel legal argument: a Hawaii man is suing a video-game maker because he's become addicted to the game and "can't function" any more. No, really.

    From this story on Wired Science.
    A federal judge is allowing a negligence lawsuit to proceed against the publisher of the online virtual-world game Lineage II, amid allegations that a Hawaii man became so addicted he is “unable to function independently in usual daily activities such as getting up, getting dressed, bathing or communicating with family and friends.” Craig Smallwood, the plaintiff, claims NCsoft of South Korea should pay unspecified monetary damages because of the addictive nature of the game. Smallwood claims to have played Lineage II for 20,000 hours between 2004 and 2009. Among other things, he alleges he would not have begun playing if he was aware “that he would become addicted to the game.”

  • August 20, 2010

    German Government Shelling Out Big Bucks for Radioactive Boar Meat

    By Chad Love

    Gun? Check. Binos? Check. Knife? Check. Geiger counter? Check. Remember Chernobyl? It's the nuclear disaster that just keeps on giving...
     
    From this story on CBS News
    Well, if wild boars don't already haunt your nightmares, try radioactive boars. Almost 25 years after the Chernobyl meltdown in Ukraine, the German government is making big payments to hunters to compensate them for radioactive meat that is considered too dangerous for human consumption. According to the Environment Ministry in Berlin, almost euro 425,000 ($555,000) was paid to compensate hunters for contaminated wild boar meat - four times higher than payments made in 2007.  But Der Spiegel reports that the higher payments have more to do with the exploding boar population, caused by climate change. As Central Europe warms up, beech and oak trees overproduce seeds and farmers are growing more crops that the wild pigs eat, Torsten Reinwald, of the German Hunting Federation, told the Associated Press. "The number of boars in Germany has quadrupled or quintupled over the last years, as has the number of boars shot," Reinwald said. According to the German Hunting Federation, 650,000 boars were shot during the 2008-2009 hunting season, compared with 287,000 the year before.

  • August 19, 2010

    New Evidence of Ancient Butchering Techniques

    By Chad Love

    Here's another one from the "this is really going to piss off PETA" files. Seem humans have been gnoshing on the butchered flesh of innocent sentient beings far longer than was previously thought. Hooray!
     
    From this story on CBS News.
    Humans Carved Meat Far Earlier Than Thought.
    Every time we slice into a steak or cut into some chicken, we’re taking part in a technological heritage that stretches back at least 3.4 million years.

    Back then, the only cutting implements around were sharp pieces of stone and there were no true humans around to wield them. But there were still butchers- one of our ancestral species, Australopithecus afarensis was already using stone tools to flay meat off bones, leaving small nicks with every cut. Such marked bones have been found and they push back the earliest estimates of tool use among human ancestors by 800,000 years. In January 2009, a team led by Shannon McPherron from the Max Planck Institute found bones which had clearly been worked over with stone tools. The bones, uncovered in Dikika, Ethiopia, include the rib of a cow-sized animal and the thighbone of a goat-sized one. Both bore cuts and scratches inflicted by sharp objects and dents produced by crushing hammers.

  • August 19, 2010

    Study Says Ancient Hunters Didn't Kill Off Mammoths

    By Chad Love

    Ancient hunters have been blamed for everything from the disappearance of large mammal species to global warming. But according to a recent study, we're blameless, after all. At least for the mammoth thing.
     
    From this story on ScienceDaily.com
    Dwindling Green Pastures, Not Hunting, May Have Killed Off the Mammoth.
    A massive reduction in grasslands and the spread of forests may have been the primary cause of the decline of mammals such as the woolly mammoth, woolly rhino and cave lion, according to Durham University scientists. The findings of the new study challenge the theory that human beings were the primary cause of the extinction of mammals through hunting, competition for land and increased pressure on habitats.

  • August 18, 2010

    Ted Nugent Busted for Game Violations in California

    By Chad Love

    Ted Nugent, the man everyone loves to love or loves to hate, was recently popped with several game violations after filming an episode of his hunting show in California.
     
    From this story in the Sacramento Bee
    Rock star Ted Nugent, a 1970s guitar hero for hits including "Cat Scratch Fever," has recently created a successful second career as an advocate for hunting and outdoor ethics. His television show, "Spirit of the Wild," is a four-time "Golden Moose" award winner on the Outdoor Channel. He has used his celebrity status to help promote better pay and working conditions for California game wardens, and consistently rails against poachers and other wildlife criminals. So it was with a double take of disbelief that two California game wardens sat down in February to watch the show, and witnessed Nugent allegedly violate several California hunting laws.

  • August 18, 2010

    How-To: Trap Your Own Pigeons With a Catapult Net

    By Chad Love

    Pen-raised gamebirds for dog training aren't free. Pigeons, when you can trap them, are. That is, when you can trap them. With that in mind, this video is pure gundog trainer porn...
     
    From Wired Science:

  • August 18, 2010

    Federal Judge Says Logging Road Run-off Is Pollution

    By Chad Love

    In a decision that will have a major impact on trout and salmon populations in the Pacific Northwest, logging road run-off can now be regulated as pollution.
     
    From this story on Oregon Public Broadcasting:
    Rainwater channeled by logging roads into rivers and streams is pollution and can be regulated under the Clean Water Act. That was the decision today from the federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, in a case involving the Tillamook State Forest. As, David Nogueras reports the ruling could have wide-reaching implications for logging operations in the Pacific Northwest. The Northwest Environmental Defense Center brought the case against the Oregon State Forester and the Oregon Board of Forestry as well as a number of timber companies.

  • August 18, 2010

    Nuisance Geese Back in Prospect Park Despite Gassing Program

    By Chad Love

    Five weeks after "The Great Goose Gas-Off" in New York City's Prospect Park, the geese (new ones, not zombie honkers) are back.
     
    From this story in the New York Times:
    Five weeks after wildlife authorities rounded up Prospect Park’s geese and gassed them, provoking the ire of residents and wildlife advocates alike, legions of new, death-defying geese continue to move into the prime real estate that is Prospect Park Lake. Anne-Katrin Titze and Ed Bahlman, Brooklyn residents who discovered the birds’ disappearance last month, counted 107 geese on Prospect Park Lake on Sunday. “They are clearly replacing the ones that were killed,” Ms. Titze said, although she lamented that some had already fallen prey to barbed lures and fishing line that were left in the lake.