Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

  • March 31, 2011

    Sex Offenders List Indiana Fishing Cabins As Permanent Residences

    By Chad Love

    Here's a tip for anyone thinking about starting up a fishing camp cabin-rental business: stick with renting your cabins to anglers and only anglers...

    From this story in the Chicago Tribune:
    A central Indiana fishing camp might be forced to remove its 50 cabins after it provided temporary housing to recently paroled sex offenders who listed the cabins as their permanent residences, apparently violating a local zoning ordinance. The Pendleton Board of Zoning Appeals is due to consider a new zoning variance for Pine Lakes on April 19 after revoking a variance last week that allowed the camp to have the cabins. Town manager Doug McGee told The Herald Bulletin of Anderson that the cabins were not zoned for residency.

  • March 31, 2011

    PETA Wants To Sponsor 'Fishing Hurts' Rest Stop Outside Troutville, VA

    By Chad Love

    Fishing hurts, and PETA wants you to know about it by sponsoring a roadside rest stop in Virginia right outside the city of...Troutville.

    From the story in the Roanoke Times:

    Gov. Bob McDonnell announced an initiative last week that would allow for sponsorships at Virginia's highway rest areas to help offset the cost of operating the facilities. And now the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals wants in on the action. PETA has sent a letter to the Virginia Department of Transportation expressing its interest in sponsoring the Interstate 81 rest stop at mile marker 158 near Troutville and renaming it the "Fishing Hurts" rest area. It also would like to get a reduced sponsorship rate as a nonprofit. And forget about that junk food in the vending machines. The "Fishing Hurts" rest area would have "delicious vegan faux-fish sticks" and other fish-free snacks, according to PETA's letter.

  • March 30, 2011

    Woman Smacked By Flying 200-Pound Ray in Florida

    By Chad Love

    What is it with flying fish lately? First, there's the mako leaping into a boat in Texas and in Florida a tourist gets whacked by an airborne ray. From this story on ABClocal.com:

    Jennifer and David Hausch have quite a story to tell from their Florida vacation after a huge ray jumped into their tour boat, striking Jennifer. The Crystal Lake couple was on an eco-tour boat ride Friday in Florida when a 200 pound spotted eagle ray struck her in the chest. She was not injured, according to wildlife officials. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation team had to tie a rope around the huge fish to pull it back into the water. The eagle ray is protected in Florida waters. It is not considered dangerous to humans.

  • March 29, 2011

    Wealthy Hunters Face Off Against Local Unemployed in Arkansas

    By Chad Love

    An interesting dynamic is playing out in a small Arkansas town torn between preservation for the benefit of a few wealthy duck hunters versus jobs for the many, but jobs in an industry under fire for pollution.

    From this AP story in the Washington Post:
    The barbed-wire fence surrounding the Hempstead County Hunting Club divides more than property lines. It separates rich from poor. On one side: wealthy duck hunters who have preserved a private forested paradise largely untouched by chain saws. On the other: the people of this struggling Arkansas town where jobs are scarce and families live in run-down trailers. The hunters are now waging a bitter legal battle over construction of a coal-fired power plant, and the dispute has laid bare the class tensions that have long beset this rural area. Townspeople welcome the new facility because it will bring jobs and valuable tax revenue. But club members fear the plant will spew pollutants that cause acid rain, threatening the pristine hunting grounds they have protected for more than a century.

  • March 29, 2011

    Kansas Legislature Approves Silencer Hunting Bill

    By Chad Love

    If you're a Kansas resident, there could be a new sound coming soon to your neck of the woods, the sound of...silence?

    From this AP story on fox4kc.com:
    The Kansas Legislature has approved a bill that would allow the use of silencers for hunting, fishing and fur harvesting. The bill, supported by the National Rifle Association, is awaiting Gov. Sam Brownback's signature. The Hays Daily News reports that the bill received only one no vote in the Senate and was unanimously approved by the House last week.

  • March 28, 2011

    How To Spice Up Golf: Mountain Lion Hazard

    By Chad Love

    Impatient duffers on this Arizona golf course are well-advised to not play through this particular party...

    From this story on ArizonaCentral.com:
    A north Scottsdale couple feel lucky to have made a rare sighting of three mountain lions this week on the fourth hole of Desert Mountain Golf Club's Cochise Course. Desert Mountain resident Linda Borman said she quickly snapped a few photographs on Monday afternoon after her husband, Ty, saw the mother and her two cubs lounging on the fairway of the 546-yard, par-5 hole.

  • March 28, 2011

    New Study: House Cats Taking Serious Toll on Wildlife

    By Chad Love

    A new study on housecats and bird predation confirms what many have been saying for decades: your cute, cuddly tabby cat is a bloodthirsy killing machine that is taking a serious toll on wildlife.

    From this story in the New York Times:
    While public attention has focused on wind turbines as a menace to birds, a new study shows that a far greater threat may be posed by a more familiar antagonist: the pet house cat. A new study in The Journal of Ornithology on the mortality of baby gray catbirds in the Washington suburbs found that cats were the No. 1 killer in the area, by a large margin. Nearly 80 percent of the birds were killed by predators, and cats were responsible for 47 percent of those deaths, according to the researchers, from the Smithsonian Institution and Towson University in Maryland.

  • March 25, 2011

    Can Gas Drilling and Pennsylvania Wildlife Co-Exist?

    By Chad Love

    Right now the impacts of natural gas exploration in Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale is a hot environmental issue. But can gas drilling and Pennsylvania wildlife co-exist? A qualified yes, according to researchers at Penn State University.

    From this story in the Altoona Mirror:
    The location of a Marcellus Shale drilling pad site could mean the difference between life or extinction for some of Pennsylvania's unique wildlife, Penn State officials said Thursday. But if planned properly, there's room in the state's woodlands for it to thrive alongside responsible drilling, Penn State wildlife resources professor Margaret C. Brittingham said. "Natural gas drilling and protecting our natural resource base don't have to be incompatible," she said. "But it requires forethought, planning and trade-offs." Such measures are the only logical step here, considering Marcellus drilling will become a part of western Pennsylvania's industry and landscape for decades to come, Penn State researchers told about 20 people who attended a Cambria County Conservation District's Marcellus Shale forum.

  • March 24, 2011

    Mongolia Calls Off Hunt of Endangered Snow Leopard

    By Chad Love

    Ever wanted to hunt the endangered snow leopard? Too bad. The Mongolian government has just reversed an earlier decision to allow foreign hunters to kill four endangered snow leopards for "scientific purposes."

    From this story on xinhuanet.com:
    The Mongolian government had revoked a decision it made earlier this month to allow foreigners to hunt leopards for scientific purpose, local media reported Wednesday. Mongolian Environment and Tourism Minister L. Gansukh canceled the permission to kill four leopards for scientific purpose this year, after meeting researchers and representatives of non-government organizations to discuss the issue. The researchers opposed the decision made by the cabinet on March 2. They said genetic research and other modern technologies made it possible to do scientific research without killing the highly endangered species.

  • March 24, 2011

    Iowa Dove Hunting Bill Passes, Goes Before Governor

    By Chad Love

    Remember that Humane Society poll that indicated a majority of of Iowans opposed dove hunting?

    Apparently Iowa legislators didn’t get the memo, because a measure creating Iowa's first dove season has passed both houses and will now go to the governor for approval.

    From this story on radioiowa.com
    Iowa hunters may be able to legally shoot mourning doves this fall. It’s been illegal to hunt mourning doves for nearly a century in this state, but the Iowa House has endorsed the idea of allowing a dove hunting season here....Governor Branstad has promised to sign the bill into law. “I tell you, I know somebody that wants to be here for the bill signing: my son, Marcus,” Branstad said this afternoon during an interview with Radio Iowa. “He is really excited about this. This kid loves to hunt, a lot of different species, and this is one more.”