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  • October 31, 2012

    Video: A Guide to Trading Halloween Candy

    By Chad Love

    This has nothing at all to do with hunting, fishing or anything even remotely outdoorsy, but that's OK because it's Halloween, and this video is awesome. Not only does it remind me of the furious post-Halloween candy-trading sessions of my youth, you might be able to use a few of these strategies on your next gun trade...(via BoingBoing)

  • October 30, 2012

    Couple Captures Mountain Lions Eating Elk On Trail Cam Video

    By Chad Love

    One of the standard scenes in many of Gary Larson's brilliant, and lamentably no more, one-frame The Far Side cartoons is of a group of lions and/or vultures gathered around a carcass, feeding, with some hilarious caption underneath. One wonders what Larson may have come up with after watching this amazing footage of a group of Montana mountain lions feeding on an elk carcass.

    From this story in the Missoulian

    A Darby couple has captured some amazing video footage of several mountain lions feeding on an elk carcass in their pasture. Ben Ricciardi, who lives with his wife Betty on the West Fork Road near the Nez Perce cutoff, noticed that something had killed an elk in his pasture about a week ago. He set up a motion-detecting camera pointed at the carcass out of curiosity, and the footage he got was incredible.

    In two separate 10-second clips, a group of mountain lions can be seen hanging around the carcass at night. One lion can be seen chewing on the carcass and dragging it a little ways. “I’ve never seen nothing like it,” Ricciardi said. “That carcass is only 75 or 80 feet from my house. They devoured that whole elk in three days. Hide, bones, everything. They really did.” 

  • October 30, 2012

    UT Boy Scout Troop Builds Fishing-Line Recycling Receptacles

    By Chad Love

    One of the most careless and irresponsible things an angler can do is leave discarded fishing line at fishing sights. Not only is discarded fishing line unsightly and the mark of a true slob angler, it's also death to any creatures that get entangled in it. But one such encounter between a duck and some discarded monofilament ended up triggering a cool environmental project for a couple of Utah boy scouts.

    From this story in the Salt Lake Tribune:

    John and Steven Petersen, brothers from Lehi, were fishing at Highland Glen Park back in June when they noticed a duck wrapped in fishing line. They wondered what had happened and what they could do to help the bird. While they were pondering what to do Tonya Kieffer, a community fisheries biologists with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, showed up and started chasing the duck.

  • October 30, 2012

    Montana Hunter Tags Giant Wolf

    By Chad Love

  • October 29, 2012

    Quail Forever Releases a State-By-State Quail Hunting Forecast

    By Chad Love

    Quail hunters looking to make travel plans for the quail seasons that are set to kick off in many states can get an idea of what to expect with the release of Quail Forever's comprehensive nationwide, state-by-state season outlook, which was just released last week.

    From the Quail Forever website:

    Across the country, the mild winter of 2011-12 gave many states’ quail populations a needed reprieve from the cold, wet winters of recent years. Leading into summer, productive nesting conditions in early spring across the country gave quail managers hope of a significantly increased year of quail production. But as temperatures increased, rains decreased, and much of the country became locked in drought throughout the summer. While most quail managers agree that quail can handle a pound of heat for an ounce of cold, wet weather, the effects of the drought of 2012 are yet to be determined for quail populations nationwide. If hens were able to get their clutches on the ground early enough in the spring, as some reports note, the more mature chicks may have been able to get a wing up on the heat and make it through to hunting season. 

  • October 29, 2012

    Wounded Warrior Tags 9-Point, 175 Pound Buck in Oklahoma

    By Chad Love

    A great story out of Oklahoma today about a record buck and the wounded warrior who got him.

    From this press release from the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, via the Outdoor Wire:

    For Quinton Picone, 23, a native of nearby Panola, first times seem to be the charm. At least first-time hunting trips, that is. On his first deer hunt Oct. 12 on the 45,000-acre McAlester Army Ammunition Plant, Picone harvested a nine-point buck that weighed just shy of 200 pounds on the hoof and dressed out at 175 pounds. The buck set a new base record for the heaviest deer taken on the property, and Picone's name now will appear first on that list. "It was crazy. It was pretty exciting," said Picone, who was deer hunting through the Wounded Warriors in Action program along with two other Army buddies from Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio. 

  • October 26, 2012

    South Florida's Rogue Monkey Finally Caught by Wildlife Officials

    By Chad Love

    Well, it's finally happened: After three long, glorious years of swinging amongst the treetops and terrorizing retirees, South Florida's folk hero rogue monkey, the one they said could never be captured, has been taken down with a dart to the butt. The terror is over...

    From this story on cbsnews.com:
    The monkey that has evaded Florida wildlife officials for more than three years has been caught. Wildlife officials nabbed the monkey Wednesday afternoon after a five-hour stakeout near a wooded area in a south St. Petersburg neighborhood. "We concealed ourselves in the area," said Baryl Martin, spokesperson for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, "and we waited for the monkey to approach." The the monkey was shot with a tranquilizer dart. 

  • October 26, 2012

    Montana Wolf Hunting Season: 25 Tags Filled in 7 Weeks

    By Chad Love

    Montana wolf hunters are off to a quick start this season, with 25 wolves being taken across the state so far.

    From this story in the Ravalli Republic:
    Montana’s wolf season is off to a fast start, with 25 of the large predators killed after a six-week archery season and just over a week of rifle hunting. Biologists with the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks are hoping to reduce the number of wolves in the state in an effort to cut down on predation of game animals and livestock attacks. The FWP Commission this year approved an aggressive wolf hunting season that includes no statewide quota, a season longer than four months and trapping. As of Thursday afternoon, hunters had killed 25 wolves. And the kill was well distributed, with wolves taken in 12 of the state’s 17 wolf management units. 

    And if you haven't yet tagged your wolf, don't worry. According to the story, there's still plenty of wolves out there.

  • October 25, 2012

    13 People Killed, 33 Wounded Since Start of Italian Hunting Season

    By Chad Love

    If you plan on hunting Italy this year, you may want to learn (and practice) a few key phrases, like "watch where you're pointing that gun," because, according to this Reuters story, it's pretty dangerous to be a hunter in L'Italia. 

    Italian hunting enthusiasts have killed 13 people and wounded 33 in shooting accidents since the season opened in September, increasing pressure to reform antiquated hunting laws. The death toll swelled across the country this weekend when a 16-year old was killed by a friend while hunting, a pensioner was shot and wounded in his garden and a cyclist was hospitalised after being hit with grapeshot. Hunting groups agree with environmentalists that the law - which allows hunters to roam on private land and discharge firearms within 150 metres (yards) of a house - should be changed. But the sides have become entrenched in a long-running stalemate over how.

  • October 24, 2012

    Rabbit Hunter Stuck Treading Water in Well for 8 Hours Before Rescue

    By Chad Love

    Bird hunters and parents know all about the dangers old, abandoned wells pose to curious dogs and children, but it's not just kids and dogs that need to watch out for wells. One wrong step or one bad decision and we could find ourselves trapped in a very bad place. That's what happened to one Florida rabbit hunter when he stepped on a plywood well cover and ended up in twelve feet of water.

    From this story in the New York Daily News:
    One wrong step turned a stroll through familiar territory into a nightmare. Christopher Johnson, 28, fell though plywood to the bottom of a deep well while rabbit hunting early Saturday morning. His screams went unheard for more than eight hours as he managed to keep his head above water in at least 12 feet of cold, dirty water. He thought he would never escape as his stamina slowly faded.