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  • February 12, 2013

    Largest Crocodile in Captivity Dies

    By Chad Love

    You may recall a blog post from a couple years back about a small village in the Philippines pinning its economic hopes on building a theme park around the world's largest crocodile in captivity.

    Well, it's back to the drawing board for the villagers, and off to the taxidermist for the croc...

  • February 8, 2013

    Researchers: Salmon Memorize Magnetic Fields to Guide Them Back to Spawning Grounds

    By Chad Love

    How salmon manage to find their way back to the river of their birth is one of the great mysteries of the natural world. Now scientists believe they may have solved this mystery.

    From this story in the (UK) Daily Mail:
    Ever wondered how salmon navigate across thousands of miles of ocean without getting lost? After years feeding at sea, the fish swim through vast expanses of featureless water back to the rivers where they hatched. Now scientists may have finally answered a mystery that has baffled them for decades, after finding evidence suggesting salmon use the Earth’s magnetic field to guide them back to their spawning grounds.

  • February 8, 2013

    Film Explores Youth Interest in the Outdoors

    By Chad Love

    It's an all-too-common lament among parents that getting kids interested in the outdoors is becoming harder and harder to do. But what to do about it? According to this evocative short film (hat tip to Southern Rockies Nature Blog for the find) made by a father and scoutmaster in Montana, "maybe teens aren't interested in nature because we're selling them too much freedom to consume, rather than enough opportunity to explore."

  • February 7, 2013

    Minnesota Calls Off Moose Season Due to Declining Population

    By Chad Love

    Remember last week's blog post on Minnesota's declining moose population and what it might mean for that state's moose season?  Apparently, it means it's being shut down...

    From this story on Fox News:
    Minnesota canceled the state's 2013 and future moose hunting seasons Wednesday, citing a "precipitous" decline in the moose population. Department of Natural Resources officials said in a news release that their annual aerial survey to estimate Minnesota's moose population was "extremely disappointing."

  • February 7, 2013

    MI May See First Hunting, Fishing License Fee Hike Since '97

    By Chad Love

    The governor of Michigan has announced a plan to raise that state's hunting and fishing license fees for the first time since 1997 in an effort to hire more conservation officers and improve wildlife habitat.

    From this story in thehttp://www.freep.com/article/20130207/NEWS15/130207030/Gov-Snyder-calls-... " target="_blank"> Detroit Free Press:
    Gov. Rick Snyder’s 2013-14 budget proposes double-digit hikes to Michigan’s hunting and fishing license fees as part of a plan to hire more conservation officers and improve the state’s habitat for fish and game. If approved by the Legislature, the license fee increases would be the first since 1997, according to Department of Natural Resources officials. Keith Creagh, the DNR director, said the state’s natural resources, including parks, and lakes and trails, are so important to Michigan’s tourism industry that he sees the investments proposed in today’s budget as key to the state’s long-term recovery from the recent decade-long recession. “Michigan doesn’t need to take a back seat to anybody on world-class resources,” Creagh said Wednesday.

  • February 6, 2013

    Oldest Known Wild Bird Hatches Chick

    By Chad Love

    Are you an aging baby boomer trying desperately to hang onto your youth? If so, perhaps you should take a little inspiration from an albatross named Wisdom. Why? Because this senior citizen is still birthing kids and circumnavigating the Pacific in her late 60s. Take that, Jane Fonda.

    From this story on discovery.com
    In the same year Elvis Presley first hit the U.S. charts, one particular Laysan albatross was observed  for the first time. Now, 62 years later, that bird is still rocking and rolling out eggs. Wisdom, as she is named, recently hatched a chick for the sixth year in a row.

  • February 6, 2013

    AR Couple Goes Fishing, Buys 2 Winning Lottery Tickets from Same Store

    By Chad Love

    You always dream about catching a big one when you go fishing, and boy, did this Arkansas couple land a trophy...

    From this story on abcnews.com:
    An Arkansas couple who set out for a day of fishing came home with quite the fish story: Two winning lottery tickets, including a $1 million prize.

  • February 4, 2013

    Hunting for Turtles on an Ice-Covered River?

    By Chad Love

    A man and woman who were apparently "hunting turtles" fell through the ice of a New Jersey river this weekend.

    From this story on cbslocal.com:
    A man and woman were out of the hospital Sunday, after they fell through the ice in the Passaic River while turtle hunting. The 30-year-old woman called 911 around 8:15 p.m. Saturday to report that her 37-year-old boyfriend had fallen into the water, police said. The woman then apparently tried to step in and help the man herself, only to fall in too. Rescue crews soon arrived and had to paddle against the current and cut down trees with chainsaws to reach the couple, who were holding on to a tree.

  • February 1, 2013

    Russian Family Isolated from World Survives in Siberian Taiga for 40 Years

    By Chad Love

    For a number of years following the end of World War II, Japanese soldiers would occasionally emerge from the jungles in the Pacific theater, either unwilling to believe or unaware that the war was over. The last verified Japanese holdout came out of hiding in the Philippines and officially surrendered back in 1974. It's an incredible story, but a piece in this month's Smithsonian magazine tops it, in both longevity and in the sheer harshness of the landscape in which it occurs. In 1978, Soviet geologists discovered a family of six eking out a desperate existence in the depths of the vast Siberian taiga. They had been living there, completely cut off from all human contact, completely unaware of events like WWII, since 1936.

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